Adirondack (adj.) Look up Adirondack at Dictionary.com
1906, in reference to a type of lawn or deck chair said to have been designed in 1903 by a Thomas Lee, owner of the Westport Mountain Spring, a resort in the Adirondack region of New York State, and commercially manufactured the following year, but said originally to have been called Westport chair after the town where it was first made. Adirondack Mountains is a back-formation from Adirondacks, treated as a plural noun but really from Mohawk (Iroquoian) adiro:daks "tree-eaters," a name applied to neighboring Algonquian tribes, in which the -s is an imperfective affix.
adit (n.) Look up adit at Dictionary.com
"entrance," c.1600, from Latin aditus "approach, entrance, a going to or drawing near," from past participle stem of adire "to approach," from ad- "to" (see ad-) + ire "to go," from PIE root *ei- "to go" (see ion).
adjacent (adj.) Look up adjacent at Dictionary.com
early 15c., from Latin adiacentem (nominative adiacens) "lying at," present participle of adiacere "lie at, border upon, lie near," from ad- "to" (see ad-) + iacere "to lie, rest," literally "to throw" (see jet (v.)), with notion of "to cast (oneself) down."
adjectival (adj.) Look up adjectival at Dictionary.com
1797, from adjective + -al (1).
adjective Look up adjective at Dictionary.com
late 14c., as an adjective, "adjectival," in noun adjective, from Old French adjectif (14c.), from Latin adjectivum "that is added to (the noun)," neuter of adjectivus "added," from past participle of adicere "to throw or place (a thing) near," from ad- "to" (see ad-) + comb. form of iacere "to throw" (see jet (v.)). Also as a noun from late 14c. In 19c. Britain, the word itself often was a euphemism for the taboo adjective bloody.
They ... slept until it was cool enough to go out with their 'Towny,' whose vocabulary contained less than six hundred words, and the Adjective. [Kipling, "Soldiers Three," 1888]
adjoin (v.) Look up adjoin at Dictionary.com
c.1300, "unite, ally" from Old French ajoin- stem of ajoindre "join together, unite," from Latin adiungere "fasten on, harness, join to," from ad- "to" (see ad-) + iungere "to bind together" (see jugular). Meaning "be contiguous with, be adjacent to" is from late 14c. Related: Adjoined; adjoining.
adjourn (v.) Look up adjourn at Dictionary.com
early 14c., ajournen, "assign a day" (for convening or reconvening), from Old French ajourner (12c.) "meet" (at an appointed time), from the phrase à jorn "to a stated day" (à "to" + journ "day," from Latin diurnus "daily;" see diurnal).

The sense is to set a date for a re-meeting. Meaning "to close a meeting" (with or without intention to reconvene) is from early 15c. Meaning "to go in a body to another place" (1640s) is colloquial. The -d- was added 16c. but is unwarranted, as the compound is not from Latin. Related: Adjourned; adjourning.
adjournment (n.) Look up adjournment at Dictionary.com
mid-15c., from Old French ajornement "daybreak, dawn; summons (to appear in court)," from ajorner (see adjourn).
adjudge (v.) Look up adjudge at Dictionary.com
late 14c., "to make a judicial decision," from Old French ajugier "to judge, pass judgment on," from Latin adiudicare "grant or award as a judge," from ad- "to" (see ad-) + iudicare "to judge," which is related to iudicem (see judge (v.)). Sense of "have an opinion" is from c.1400. Related: Adjudged; adjudging.
adjudicate (v.) Look up adjudicate at Dictionary.com
1700, from Latin adiudicatus, past participle of adiudicare (see adjudge). Related: Adjudicated; adjudicating.
adjudication (n.) Look up adjudication at Dictionary.com
1690s, from French adjudication or directly from Late Latin adiudicationem (nominative adiudicatio), noun of action from past participle stem of adiudicare (see adjudge).
adjudicative (adj.) Look up adjudicative at Dictionary.com
1809; see adjudicate + -ive. Perhaps modeled on French adjudicatif.
adjudicator (n.) Look up adjudicator at Dictionary.com
1804, agent noun in Latin form from adjudicate.
adjunct (n.) Look up adjunct at Dictionary.com
1580s, from Latin adiunctus "closely connected, joined, united" (as a noun, "a characteristic, essential attribute"), past participle of adiungere "join to" (see adjoin).
adjunct (adj.) Look up adjunct at Dictionary.com
1590s, from Latin adiunctus "closely connected, joined, united," past participle of adiungere "join to" (see adjoin). Adjunct professor is 1826, American English.
adjuration (n.) Look up adjuration at Dictionary.com
late 14c., "exorcism," from Late Latin adjurationem (nominative adjuratio) "a swearing to," noun of action from past participle stem of adjurare (see adjure). Originally a term in exorcism (with conjuration). General sense is from 17c.
adjure (v.) Look up adjure at Dictionary.com
late 14c., "to bind by oath; to question under oath," from Latin adiurare "confirm by oath, add an oath, to swear to in addition," in Late Latin "to put (someone) to an oath," from ad- "to" (see ad-) + iurare "swear," from ius (genitive iuris) "law" (see jurist). Related: Adjured; adjuring.
adjust (v.) Look up adjust at Dictionary.com
late 14c., ajusten, "to correct, remedy;" reborrowed by c.1600 in sense "arrange, settle, compose," from Middle French adjuster, Old French ajouter "to join" (12c.), from Late Latin adiuxtare "to bring near," from Latin ad- "to" (see ad-) + iuxta "next," related to iungere "to join" (see jugular).

Influenced by folk etymology derivation from Latin iustus "just, equitable, fair." Meaning "to arrange (something) so as to conform with (a standard or another thing)" is from 1660s. Insurance sense is from 1755. Meaning "to get used to" first recorded 1924. Related: Adjusted; adjusting.
adjustable (adj.) Look up adjustable at Dictionary.com
1775, from adjust + -able. Related: Adjustably; adjustability.
adjuster (n.) Look up adjuster at Dictionary.com
1670s, agent noun in English form from adjust. Insurance sense is from 1830.
adjustment (n.) Look up adjustment at Dictionary.com
1640s, from French ajustement or else a native formation from adjust (v.) + -ment.
adjustor (n.) Look up adjustor at Dictionary.com
1857, of certain muscles, agent noun in Latin form from adjust (v.).
adjutant (n.) Look up adjutant at Dictionary.com
"military officer who assists superior officers," c.1600, from Latin adiutantem (nominative adiutans), present participle of adiutare "to give help to, help zealously, serve," frequentative of adiuvare (past participle adiutus) "help, assist, aid, support," from ad- "to" (see ad-) + iuvare "to help, give strength, support," perhaps from same root as iuvenis "young person" (see young).
administer (v.) Look up administer at Dictionary.com
late 14c., administren, aministren "to manage as a steward," from Old French amenistrer "help, aid, be of service to" (12c., Modern French administrer, the -d- restored 16c.), and directly from Latin administrare "to help, assist; manage, control, guide, superintend; rule, direct," from ad- "to" (see ad-) + ministrare "serve" (see minister (v.)). Used of medicine, etc., "to give," from 1540s. Related: Administered; administering.
administrate (v.) Look up administrate at Dictionary.com
1630s, from Latin administratus, past participle of administrare (see administer). In modern use a back-formation from administration. Related: Administrated; administrating.
administration (n.) Look up administration at Dictionary.com
mid-14c., "act of giving or dispensing;" late 14c., "management, act of administering," from Latin administrationem (nominative administratio) "aid, help, cooperation; direction, management," noun of action from past participle stem of administrare (see administer).

Early 15c. as "management of a deceased person's estate." Meaning "the government" is attested from 1731 in British usage. Meaning "a U.S. president's period in office" is first recorded 1796 in writings of George Washington.
administrative (adj.) Look up administrative at Dictionary.com
1731, from Latin administrativus, from past participle stem of administrare (see administer). Related: Administratively.
administrator (n.) Look up administrator at Dictionary.com
mid-15c., from Middle French administrateur or directly from Latin administrator "a manager, conductor," agent noun from past participle stem of administrare (see administer). Estate sense is earliest. For ending, see -er.
admirable (adj.) Look up admirable at Dictionary.com
mid-15c., "worthy of admiration," from Middle French admirable (Old French amirable), from Latin admirabilis "admirable, wonderful," from admirari "to admire" (see admiration). In early years it also carried a stronger sense of "awe-inspiring."
admirably (adv.) Look up admirably at Dictionary.com
1590s, from admirable + -ly (2).
admiral (n.) Look up admiral at Dictionary.com
c.1200, "Saracen commander," from Old French amirail (12c.) "Saracen military commander; any military commander," probably ultimately from Arabic title amir-ar-rahl "chief of the transport," officer in the Mediterranean fleet, from amir "leader;" influenced by Latin ad-mirabilis (see admire).

Italian form almiraglio, Spanish almirante are from confusion with Arabic words in al-. Meaning "highest-ranking naval officer" is from early 15c. As a type of butterfly, from 1720, possibly a corruption of admirable.
admiralty (n.) Look up admiralty at Dictionary.com
"naval branch of the English executive," early 15c., admiralte, from Old French amiralte, from amirail (see admiral).
admiration (n.) Look up admiration at Dictionary.com
early 15c., "wonder," from Middle French admiration (14c.) or directly from Latin admirationem (nominative admiratio) "a wondering at, admiration," noun of state from past participle stem of admirari "admire," from ad- "at" (see ad-) + mirari "to wonder," from mirus "wonderful" (see miracle). The sense has weakened steadily since 16c.
admire (v.) Look up admire at Dictionary.com
early 15c. (implied in admired), from Middle French admirer (Old French amirer, 14c.), or directly from Latin admirari "to wonder at" (see admiration). Related: Admiring; admiringly.
admirer (n.) Look up admirer at Dictionary.com
c.1600, agent noun from admire (v.). "In common speech, a lover" [Johnson], a sense recorded from 1704.
admissibility (n.) Look up admissibility at Dictionary.com
1763, from admissible + -ity.
admissible (adj.) Look up admissible at Dictionary.com
1610s, from Middle French admissible, from past participle stem of Latin admittere (see admit). Legal sense is recorded from 1849.
admission (n.) Look up admission at Dictionary.com
early 15c., "acceptance, reception, approval," from Latin admissionem (nominative admissio) "a letting in," noun of action from past participle stem of admittere (see admit). Meaning "an acknowledging" is from 1530s. Sense of "a literal act of letting in" is from 1620s. As short for admission price, by 1792.
admit (v.) Look up admit at Dictionary.com
late 14c., "let in," from Latin admittere "to allow to enter, let in, let come, give access," from ad- "to" (see ad-) + mittere "let go, send" (see mission). Sense of "to concede as valid or true" is first recorded early 15c. Related: Admitted; Admitting.
admittance (n.) Look up admittance at Dictionary.com
1580s, "the action of admitting," formed in English from admit + -ance (if from Latin, it would have been *admittence; French uses accès in this sense). Used formerly in senses where admission now prevails. Admissure was used in this sense from mid-15c.
admittedly (adv.) Look up admittedly at Dictionary.com
1780, from past participle of admit + -ly (2).
admixture (n.) Look up admixture at Dictionary.com
c.1600, with -ure, from admix (1530s), a back-formation from admixt (early 15c.), from Latin admixtus "mixed with," past participle of admiscere "to add to by mingling, mix with," from ad- "to" (see ad-) + miscere "to mix" (see mix). In Middle English admixt was mistaken as a past participle of a (then) non-existent *admix. Earlier in this sense was admixtion (late 14c.).
admonish (v.) Look up admonish at Dictionary.com
mid-14c., amonesten "remind, urge, exhort, warn, give warning," from Old French amonester (12c.) "urge, encourage, warn," from Vulgar Latin *admonestare, from Latin admonere "bring to mind, remind, suggest;" also "warn, advise, urge," from ad- "to" (see ad-) + monere "advise, warn" (see monitor (n.)).

The -d- was restored on Latin model. The ending was influenced by words in -ish (such as astonish, abolish). Related: Admonished; admonishing.
admonition (n.) Look up admonition at Dictionary.com
late 14c., amonicioun "reminding, instruction," from Old French amonicion "admonition, exhortation," from Latin admonitionem (nominative admonitio), noun of action from past participle stem of admonere (see admonish). Meaning "warning" is early 15c. The -d- was restored in English 17c.
admonitory (adj.) Look up admonitory at Dictionary.com
1590s, from Late Latin admonitorius, from Latin admonitus, past participle of admonere (see admonish).
ado (n.) Look up ado at Dictionary.com
late 14c., "conflict, fighting; difficulty, trouble," compounded from at do, dialectal in Norse influenced areas of England for to do, as some Scandinavian languages used at with infinitive of a verb where Modern English uses to. For sense development, compare to-do. Meaning "fuss" is from early 15c. Also used in Middle English for "dealings, traffic," and "sexual intercourse" (both c.1400).
adobe (n.) Look up adobe at Dictionary.com
1739, American English, from Spanish adobe, from oral form of Arabic al-tob "the brick," from Coptic tube "brick," a word found in hieroglyphics.
adolescence (n.) Look up adolescence at Dictionary.com
"age following childhood" (especially the period from the 15th to the 21st year), early 15c., from Middle French adolescence (14c.), from Latin adolescentia "youth," noun of state from adolescentem (see adolescent (n.)).
adolescent (n.) Look up adolescent at Dictionary.com
mid-15c., "youth, young man," from Middle French adolescent (15c.) or directly from Latin adolescentem (nominative adolescens) "growing, near maturity, youthful," present participle of adolescere "grow up, come to maturity, ripen," from ad- "to" (see ad-) + alescere "be nourished," hence, "increase, grow up," inchoative of alere "to nourish" (see old). Adolesce was a back-formed verb used early 20c. by H.G. Wells, G.B. Shaw, Louis MacNeice, but it seems not to have taken.
adolescent (adj.) Look up adolescent at Dictionary.com
1785, from Latin adolescentem (nominative adolescens) "growing, near maturity, youthful," present participle of adolescere "grow up, come to maturity, ripen" (see adolescent (n.)).