Anastasia Look up Anastasia at Dictionary.com
fem. proper name, from fem. of Late Latin Anastasius, from Greek Anastasios, from anastasis "resurrection," literally "a standing or rising up," from ana "up; again" (see ana-) + histanai "to cause to stand, to stand up" from PIE root *sta- "stand" (see stet).
anastomosis (n.) Look up anastomosis at Dictionary.com
1610s, medical or Modern Latin, from Greek anastomosis "outlet, opening," from anastomoein "to furnish with a mouth," from stoma "mouth" (see stoma). Related: Anastomotic.
anastrophe (n.) Look up anastrophe at Dictionary.com
"inversion of usual word order," 1570s, from Greek anastrophe "a turning back, a turning upside down," from anastrephein "to turn up or back, to turn upside down," from ana "back" (see ana-) + strephein "to turn" (see strophe).
anathema (n.) Look up anathema at Dictionary.com
1520s, "an accursed thing," from Latin anathema "an excommunicated person; the curse of excommunication," from Greek anathema "a thing accursed," originally "a thing devoted," literally "a thing set up (to the gods)," from ana- "up" (see ana-) + tithenai "to put, place" (see theme).

Originally simply a votive offering, by the time it reached Latin the meaning had progressed through "thing devoted to evil," to "thing accursed or damned." Later applied to persons and the Divine Curse. Meaning "formal act or formula of consigning to damnation" is from 1610s.

Anathema maranatha, taken as an intensified form, is a misreading of the Syriac maran etha "the Lord hath come," which follows anathema in I Cor. xvi:22, but is not connected with it (see Maranatha).
anathematization (n.) Look up anathematization at Dictionary.com
1590s, from Medieval Latin anathematizationem (nominative anathematizatio), noun of action from past participle stem of anathematizare (see anathematize). Earlier was anathemization (1540s).
anathematize (v.) Look up anathematize at Dictionary.com
"to pronounce an anathema against," 1560s, from French anathématiser (Old French anatemer), from Latin anathematizare, from Greek anathematizein "to devote (to evil)," from stem of anathema. Alternative anathemize (1670s) is less correct and more rare. Related: Anathematized; anathematizing.
Anatolia Look up Anatolia at Dictionary.com
ancient name of Asia Minor, from Medieval Latin Anatolia, from Greek anatole "the east," originally "sunrise" (which of course happens in the east), literally "a rising above (the horizon)," from anatellein "to rise," from ana "up" (see ana-) + tellein "to accomplish, perform."
anatomic (adj.) Look up anatomic at Dictionary.com
1712, from Latin anatomicus, from Greek anatomikos "relating to anatomy," from anatomia (see anatomy). Anatomical is older.
anatomical (adj.) Look up anatomical at Dictionary.com
1580s; see anatomy + -ical.
anatomically (adv.) Look up anatomically at Dictionary.com
1640s, from anatomical + -ly (2). Anatomically correct, of dolls and meaning "with genitalia," is attested 1968, perhaps 1967, American English, in reference to Petit Frère, an imported French boy doll.
anatomize (v.) Look up anatomize at Dictionary.com
"to dissect, investigate by dissection," early 15c., from Medieval Latin anatomizare or French anatomiser (16c.), from Greek anatomia (see anatomy). Related: Anatomized; anatomizing.
anatomy (n.) Look up anatomy at Dictionary.com
late 14c., "study of the structure of living beings;" c.1400, "anatomical structures," from Old French anatomie, from Late Latin anatomia, from Greek anatomia, from anatome "dissection," from ana- "up" (see ana-) + temnein "to cut" (see tome). "Dissection" (1540s), "mummy" (1580s), and "skeleton" (1590s) were primary senses of this word in Shakespeare's day; meaning "the science of the structure of organized bodies" predominated from 17c. Often mistakenly divided as an atomy or a natomy.
The scyence of the Nathomy is nedefull and necessarye to the Cyrurgyen [1541]
ancestor (n.) Look up ancestor at Dictionary.com
c.1300, ancestre, antecessour, from Old French ancestre (12c., Modern French ancêtre), from Late Latin antecessor "predecessor," literally "foregoer," agent noun from past participle stem of Latin antecedere "to precede," from ante- "before" (see ante) + cedere "to go" (see cede). Current form from early 15c. Feminine form ancestress recorded from 1570s.
ancestral (adj.) Look up ancestral at Dictionary.com
1520s, from Old French ancestrel (Anglo-French auncestrel), from ancestre (see ancestor). Related: Ancestrally.
ancestry (n.) Look up ancestry at Dictionary.com
early 14c., from Old French ancesserie "ancestry, ancestors, forefathers," from ancestre (see ancestor); spelling modified in English by influence of ancestor.
anchor (n.) Look up anchor at Dictionary.com
Old English ancor, borrowed 9c. from Latin ancora "anchor," from or cognate with Greek ankyra "anchor, hook" (see ankle). A very early borrowing and said to be the only Latin nautical term used in the Germanic languages. The -ch- form emerged late 16c., a pedantic imitation of a corrupt spelling of the Latin word. The figurative sense of "that which gives stability or security" is from late 14c. Meaning "host or presenter of a TV or radio program" is from 1965, short for anchorman.
anchor (v.) Look up anchor at Dictionary.com
c.1200, from anchor (n.). Related: Anchored; anchoring.
anchorage (n.) Look up anchorage at Dictionary.com
mid-14c., "toll or charge for anchoring" (see anchor (v.) + -age. Meaning "act of dropping anchor, being at anchor" is from 1610s; that of "place suitable for anchoring" is from 1706. The Alaska city of Anchorage was founded 1914.
anchoress (n.) Look up anchoress at Dictionary.com
"female recluse, nun," late 14c.; see anchorite + -ess.
anchorite (n.) Look up anchorite at Dictionary.com
mid-15c., "hermit (especially those of the Eastern deserts), recluse, one who withdraws from the world for religious reasons," from Medieval Latin anchorita, from Greek anakhoretes, literally "one who has retired," agent noun from anakhorein "to retreat, go back, retire," from ana- "back" (see ana-) + khorein "withdraw, give place," from khoros "place, space, free space, room." Replaced Old English ancer, from Late Latin anchoreta.
anchorman (n.) Look up anchorman at Dictionary.com
"last man of a tug-of-war team," 1909, from anchor + man (n.). Later, "one who runs last in a relay race" (1934). Transferred sense "host or presenter of a TV or radio program" is from 1958.
anchovy (n.) Look up anchovy at Dictionary.com
1590s, from Portuguese anchova, from Genoese or Corsican dialect, perhaps ultimately from either Latin apua "small fish" (from Greek aphye "small fry") [Gamillscheg, Diez], or from Basque anchu "dried fish," from anchuva "dry" [Klein, citing Mahn].
anchylosis (n.) Look up anchylosis at Dictionary.com
"stiffness of joints," 1713, from Greek ankylos "crooked" (see angle (n.)) + -osis.
ancien regime (n.) Look up ancien regime at Dictionary.com
1794, from French ancien régime, literally "old rule," referring to the government and social order of France before the Revolution there. See ancient + regime.
ancient (adj.) Look up ancient at Dictionary.com
mid-14c., auncyen, from Old French ancien "old, long-standing, ancient," from Vulgar Latin *anteanus, literally "from before," adjectivization of Latin ante "before, in front of, against" (from PIE *anti "against," locative singular of *ant- "front, forehead;" see ante). The parasitic -t dates from 15c. by influence of words in -ent.

Specifically, in history, "belonging to the period before the fall of the Western Roman Empire" (and contrasted with medieval and modern). In English law, "from before the Norman Conquest." Ancient of Days is from Dan. vii:9. Related: Anciently.
ancient (n.) Look up ancient at Dictionary.com
"standard-bearer," 1550s, a corruption of ensign. Archaic, but preserved in Shakespeare's character Aunchient Pistoll in "Henry V."
ancillary (adj.) Look up ancillary at Dictionary.com
1660s, "subservient, subordinate," from Latin ancillaris "relating to maidservants," diminutive of ancilla "handmaid," fem. diminutive of anculus "servant," literally "he who bustles about," from root of ambi- "about" (see ambi-) + PIE *kwol-o-, from root *kwel- (1) "move round, turn about, be much about" (see cycle (n.)).
and (conj.) Look up and at Dictionary.com
Old English and, ond, originally meaning "thereupon, next," from Proto-Germanic *unda (cognates: Old Saxon endi, Old Frisian anda, Middle Dutch ende, Old High German enti, German und, Old Norse enn), from PIE *en; cognate with Latin ante, Greek anti (see ante). Phrase and how as an exclamation of emphatic agreement dates from early 1900s.
Andalusia Look up Andalusia at Dictionary.com
former name of southern Spain, from Spanish, from Arabic al Andalus, name for the entire peninsula, from Late Latin *Vandalicia "the country of the Vandals," in reference to one of the Germanic tribes that overran the Western Empire 3c.-4c. and for a time settled in southern Spain. See vandal.
andante Look up andante at Dictionary.com
musical direction, "moderately slow," 1742, from Italian andante, present participle of andare "to go," from Vulgar Latin ambitare (source of Spanish andar "to go"), from Latin ambitus, past participle of ambire "to go round, go about" (see ambient).
Andes Look up Andes at Dictionary.com
from Quechua andi "high crest."
andiron (n.) Look up andiron at Dictionary.com
c.1300, from Old French andier, of unknown origin, perhaps from Gaulish *andero- "a young bull" (cognates: Welsh anner "heifer"), which would make sense if they once had bull's heads cast onto them. Altered by influence of Middle English iren (see iron (n.)).
Andorra Look up Andorra at Dictionary.com
probably from indigenous (Navarrese) andurrial "shrub-covered land."
andouille (n.) Look up andouille at Dictionary.com
type of sausage, c.1600, from French andouille (12c.), from Latin inductilia, neuter plural of inductilis, from inducere "to load or put in" (see induct). The original notion was perhaps of the filling "introduced" into the sausage.
Andrew Look up Andrew at Dictionary.com
masc. proper name, from Old French Andreu (Modern French André), from Latin Andreas, from Greek Andreas, from andreios "manly," from aner (genitive andros) "man" (see anthropo-). Andrew Millar (1590s) for some forgotten reason became English naval slang for "government authority," and especially "the Royal Navy." St. Andrew (feast day Nov. 30) has long been regarded as patron saint of Scotland. The Andrew's cross (c.1400) supposedly resembles the one St. Andrew was crucified on.
andro- Look up andro- at Dictionary.com
word-forming element meaning "man, male," from Greek andro-, comb. form of aner (genitive andros) "man, male" (see anthropo-).
androcentric (adj.) Look up androcentric at Dictionary.com
1887, from andro- + -centric.
androcentricity (n.) Look up androcentricity at Dictionary.com
1907; see androcentric + -ity.
androcentrism (n.) Look up androcentrism at Dictionary.com
1915; see androcentric + -ism.
androcracy (n.) Look up androcracy at Dictionary.com
"rule or supremacy of men," 1883; see andro- + -cracy. Related: Androcratic.
androgen (n.) Look up androgen at Dictionary.com
male sex hormone, 1936, from andro- + -gen.
androgyne (n.) Look up androgyne at Dictionary.com
"hermaphrodite," mid-12c., from Medieval Latin androgyne, from Greek androgyne (see androgynous).
androgynous (adj.) Look up androgynous at Dictionary.com
1620s, from Latin androgynus, from Greek androgynos "hermaphrodite, male and female in one; womanish man;" as an adjective (of baths) "common to men and women," from andros, genitive of aner "male" (see anthropo-) + gyne "woman" (see queen).
androgyny (n.) Look up androgyny at Dictionary.com
1833; see androgynous.
android (n.) Look up android at Dictionary.com
"automaton resembling a human being," 1842, from Modern Latin androides (itself attested as a Latin word in English from 1727), from Greek andro- "human" (see andro-) + -eides "form, shape" (see -oid). Greek androdes meant "like a man, manly;" compare also Greek andrias "image of a man, statue." Listed as "rare" in OED 1st edition (1879), popularized from c.1951 by science fiction writers.
Andromache Look up Andromache at Dictionary.com
wife of Hector, Latin Andromache, from Greek Andromakhe, perhaps literally "whose husband excells in fighting," fem. of andromakhos "fighting with men;" see anthropo- + -machy.
Andromeda Look up Andromeda at Dictionary.com
constellation, 1667 (earlier Andromece, mid-15c.); in classical mythology the daughter of Cepheus and Cassiopeia, from Greek, literally "mindful of her husband," from andros, genitive of aner "man" (see anthropo-) + medesthai "to be mindful of, think on," related to medea (neuter plural) "counsels, plans, devices, cunning" (and source of the name Medea).
andron (n.) Look up andron at Dictionary.com
men's apartment in a house, from Greek andron, collateral form of andronitis "men's apartment," from aner (genitive andros) "man" (see anthropo-).
androphobia (n.) Look up androphobia at Dictionary.com
"morbid fear of the male sex" (sometimes, rather, "of the human race" or "of crowds), 1844, from andro- + -phobia. Related: Androphobic.
Andy Look up Andy at Dictionary.com
familiar shortening of masc. proper name Andrew (q.v.).