Anglicism (n.) Look up Anglicism at Dictionary.com
1640s, "anglicized language," from Latin Anglicus "of the English" (see Angle) + -ism. As an instance of this, from 1781.
anglicization (n.) Look up anglicization at Dictionary.com
1836, noun of action from anglicize; earlier in same sense was anglification (1822), from anglify (1751).
anglicize (v.) Look up anglicize at Dictionary.com
1710, with -ize + Medieval Latin Anglicus "of the English," from Angli "the Angles" (see Angle). Related: Anglicized; anglicizing.
Anglo (n.) Look up Anglo at Dictionary.com
"American, English-speaking white person," 1941, southwestern U.S., from Anglo-American. Anglo was used similarly of native, English-speakers in Canada from 1800 and Britain from 1964.
Anglo- Look up Anglo- at Dictionary.com
from Medieval Latin Anglo-, comb. form of Angli "the English" (see Angle).
Anglo-American Look up Anglo-American at Dictionary.com
1738, from Anglo- + American. Originally often in contrast to German immigrants. In contrast to non-English neighboring or border people in the U.S. from 1809 (adj.); 1834 (n.). Meaning "pertaining to both England and the United States" is from 1812.
Anglo-French (n.) Look up Anglo-French at Dictionary.com
the French written in England from the Norman Conquest (1066) through the Middle Ages; the administrative and legal language of England 12c.-17c.; the name is attested from 1887; popularized, if not coined, by Skeat.
And Frenssh she spak ful faire and fetisly,
After the scole of Stratford-atte-Bowe,
For Frenssh of Parys was to hir unknowe.
[Chaucer]
Anglo-Saxon Look up Anglo-Saxon at Dictionary.com
Old English Angli Saxones (plural), from Latin Anglo-Saxones, in which Anglo- is an adjective, thus literally "English Saxons," as opposed to those of the Continent (now called "Old Saxons"). Properly in reference to the Saxons of ancient Wessex, Essex, Middlesex, and Sussex.
I am a suthern man, I can not geste 'rum, ram, ruf' by letter. [Chaucer, "Parson's Prologue and Tale"]
After the Norman-French invasion of 1066, the peoples of the island were distinguished as English and French, but after a few generations all were English, and Latin-speaking scribes, who knew and cared little about Germanic history, began to use Anglo-Saxones to refer to the pre-1066 inhabitants and their descendants. When interest in Old English writing revived c.1586, the word was extended to the language we now call Old English. It has been used rhetorically for "English" in an ethnological sense from 1832, and revisioned as Angle + Saxon.
Anglomania (n.) Look up Anglomania at Dictionary.com
1787; see Anglo- + mania. Related: Anglomaniac.
Anglophile (adj.) Look up Anglophile at Dictionary.com
1864, in reference to France, from Anglo- + -phile. Both Anglomania (1787) and Anglophobia (1793) are first attested in writings of Thomas Jefferson.
Anglophobia (n.) Look up Anglophobia at Dictionary.com
1793, from Anglo- + -phobia. Related: Anglophobe; Anglophobic.
Anglophone (adj.) Look up Anglophone at Dictionary.com
"English-speaking," 1895, from Anglo- + -phone.
angora (n.) Look up angora at Dictionary.com
type of wool, 1810, from Angora, city in central Turkey (ancient Ancyra, modern Ankara), which gave its name to the goat (1745 in English), and to its silk-like wool, and to a cat whose fur resembles it (1771 in English). The city name is from the Greek word for "anchor, bend" (see angle (n.)).
angrily (adv.) Look up angrily at Dictionary.com
mid-14c., "resentful, in anger; ill-temperedly," from angry + -ly (2).
angry (adj.) Look up angry at Dictionary.com
late 14c., from anger (n.) + -y (2). Originally "full of trouble, vexatious;" sense of "enraged, irate" also is from late 14c. The Old Norse adjective was ongrfullr "sorrowful," and Middle English had angerful "anxious, eager" (mid-13c.). The phrase angry young man dates to 1941 but was popularized in reference to the play "Look Back in Anger" (produced 1956) though it does not occur in that work.

"There are three words in the English language that end in -gry. Two of them are angry and hungry. What is the third?" There is no third (except some extremely obscure ones). Richard Lederer calls this "one of the most outrageous and time-wasting linguistic hoaxes in our nation's history" and traces it to a New York TV quiz show from early 1975.
angst (n.) Look up angst at Dictionary.com
1944, from German Angst "neurotic fear, anxiety, guilt, remorse," from Old High German angust, from the root of anger. George Eliot used it (in German) in 1849, and it was popularized in English by translation of Freud's work, but as a foreign word until 1940s. Old English had a cognate word, angsumnes "anxiety," but it died out.
angstrom (n.) Look up angstrom at Dictionary.com
unit of length equal to one hundred millionth of a centimeter (used to measure wavelengths of light), 1892, named for Swedish physicist Anders Ã…ngström (1814-1874).
anguish (n.) Look up anguish at Dictionary.com
c.1200, "acute bodily or mental suffering," from Old French anguisse, angoisse "choking sensation, distress, anxiety, rage," from Latin angustia (plural angustiae) "tightness, straitness, narrowness;" figuratively "distress, difficulty," from ang(u)ere "to throttle, torment" (see anger (v.)).
anguish (v.) Look up anguish at Dictionary.com
early 14c., intransitive and reflexive; mid-14c., transitive, from Old French anguissier (Modern French angoisser), from anguisse (see anguish (n.)). Related: Anguished; anguishing.
anguishous (adj.) Look up anguishous at Dictionary.com
early 13c., from Old French angoissos, from angoisse (see anguish (n.)). Related: Anguishously.
angular (adj.) Look up angular at Dictionary.com
1590s, from Latin angularis "having corners or angles," from angulus (see angle (n.)). Earlier in an astrological sense, "occupying a cardinal point of the zodiac" (late 14c.). Angulous "having many corners" is from mid-15c.
angularity (n.) Look up angularity at Dictionary.com
1640s; see angular + -ity.
Angus Look up Angus at Dictionary.com
masc. proper name, Scottish, related to Irish Aonghus, a compound that may be rendered in English as "one choice." Also the name of a county in Scotland, hence a breed of cattle (1842) associated with that region.
anhedonia (n.) Look up anhedonia at Dictionary.com
"inability to feel pleasure," 1897, from French anhédonie, coined 1896 by French psychologist Theodule Ribot (1839-1916) as an opposite to analgesia, from Greek an-, privative prefix (see an- (1)), + hedone "pleasure" (see hedonist).
anhinga (n.) Look up anhinga at Dictionary.com
American fishing bird (also called the snake-bird), 1769, from a Tupi word which sometimes is said to mean "snake-bird."
anhydrous (adj.) Look up anhydrous at Dictionary.com
"containing no water," 1819, a modern coinage from Greek an-, privative prefix (see an- (1)), + hydor "water" (see water (n.1)). Greek did have anhydros "waterless," used of arid lands or corpses that had not been given proper funeral rites.
ani (n.) Look up ani at Dictionary.com
black bird of the cuckoo family, 1829, from Spanish or Portuguese ani, from Tupi.
anigh (adv.) Look up anigh at Dictionary.com
"nearby," c.1200, from a- (1) + nigh.
anil (n.) Look up anil at Dictionary.com
West Indian shrub, 1580s, from French or Portuguese anil (see aniline).
aniline (n.) Look up aniline at Dictionary.com
chemical base used in making colorful dyes, 1843, coined 1841 by German chemist Carl Julius Fritzsche (1808-1871) and adopted by Hofmann, ultimately from Portuguese anil "the indigo shrub," from Arabic an-nil "the indigo," assimilated from al-nil, from Persian nila, ultimately from Sanskrit nili "indigo," from nilah "dark blue." With suffix -ine indicating "derived substance" (see -ine (1); also see -ine (2) for the later, more precise, use of the suffix in chemistry).
anima (n.) Look up anima at Dictionary.com
Jung's term for the inner part of the personality, or the female component of a masculine personality, 1923, from fem. of Latin animus "the rational soul; life; the mental powers, intelligence" (see animus).
anima mundi Look up anima mundi at Dictionary.com
1670s, Medieval Latin, literally "soul of the world;" used by Abelard to render Greek psyche tou kosmou.
animadversion (n.) Look up animadversion at Dictionary.com
1590s, "criticism, blame," also sometimes in early use simply "notice, attention" (now obsolete), from Latin animadversionem (nominative animadversio) "investigation, inquiry; perception, observation," noun of action from past participle stem of animadverte "to take cognizance of," literally "to turn the mind to," from animum, accusative of animus "mind" (see animus), + advertere "to turn to" (see advertise). The sense of "to take notice of as a fault" was in Latin; in fact animadverto at times was a euphemism for "to punish with death."
animadvert (v.) Look up animadvert at Dictionary.com
early 15c., "to take notice of," from Latin animadvertere "to notice, to take cognizance of," also "to censure, blame, punish," literally "to turn the mind to" (see animadversion). Sense of "to criticize, blame, censure" in English is from 1660s. Related: Animadverted; animadverting.
animal (n.) Look up animal at Dictionary.com
early 14c. (but rare before c.1600, and not in KJV, 1611), "any living creature" (including humans), from Latin animale "living being, being which breathes," neuter of animalis "animate, living; of the air," from anima "breath, soul; a current of air" (see animus, and compare deer). Drove out the older beast in common usage. Used of brutish humans from 1580s.
animal (adj.) Look up animal at Dictionary.com
late 14c., from animal (n.). Animal rights is attested from 1879; animal liberation from 1973. Animal magnetism originally (1784) referred to mesmerism.
animalcule (n.) Look up animalcule at Dictionary.com
"very small animal," especially a microscopic one, 1590s, from Late Latin animalculum, diminutive of Latin animal (see animal (n.)). Related: Animalcular.
animalism (n.) Look up animalism at Dictionary.com
"the doctrine that man is a mere animal," 1857, from animal + -ism. Earlier, "exercise of animal faculties; physical exercise" (1831).
animalistic (adj.) Look up animalistic at Dictionary.com
1877; see animal (n.) + -istic.
animate (v.) Look up animate at Dictionary.com
1530s, "to fill with boldness or courage," from Latin animatus past participle of animare "give breath to," also "to endow with a particular spirit, to give courage to," from anima "life, breath" (see animus). Sense of "give life to" in English attested from 1742. Related: Animated; animating.
animate (adj.) Look up animate at Dictionary.com
"alive," late 14c., from Latin animatus (see animate (v.)).
animated (adj.) Look up animated at Dictionary.com
1530s, "alive," past participle adjective from animate (v.). Meaning "mentally excited" is from 1530s; "full of activity" from 1580s. The "moving pictures" sense is attested from 1895; of cartoons from 1897. Related: Animatedly.
animation (n.) Look up animation at Dictionary.com
1590s, "action of imparting life," from Latin animationem (nominative animatio) "an animating," noun of action from past participle stem of animare (see animate (v.)). Meaning "vitality" is from 1610s. Cinematographic sense is from 1912.
animator (n.) Look up animator at Dictionary.com
1630s, "one who enlivens or inspires," from Latin animator, agent noun from animare (see animate (v.)). Cinematographic sense is from 1919.
anime (n.) Look up anime at Dictionary.com
c.1985, Japanese for "animation," a term that seems to have arisen in the 1970s, apparently based on French animé "animated, lively, roused," from the same root as English animate (adj.). Probably taken into Japanese from a phrase such as dessin animé "cartoon," literally "animated design," with the adjective abstracted or mistaken, due to its position, as a noun.

Manga (q.v.) is Japanese for "comic book, graphic novel," but anime largely are based on manga and until 1970s, anime were known in Japan as manga eiga or "TV manga." The two terms are somewhat confused in English.
animism (n.) Look up animism at Dictionary.com
1866, reintroduced by English anthropologist Sir Edward Burnett Taylor (1832-1917), who defined it (1871) as the "theory of the universal animation of nature," from Latin anima "life, breath, soul" (see animus) + -ism.

Earlier sense was of "doctrine that animal life is produced by an immaterial soul" (1832), from German Animismus, coined c.1720 by physicist/chemist Georg Ernst Stahl (1660-1734) based on the concept of the anima mundi. Animist is attested from 1819, in Stahl's sense; animisic is first recorded 1871.
animosity (n.) Look up animosity at Dictionary.com
early 15c., "vigor," from Middle French animosité (14c.) or directly from Latin animositatem (nominative animositas) "boldness, vehemence," from animosus "bold, spirited," from animus (see animus). Sense of "hostile feeling" is first recorded c.1600, from a secondary sense in Latin (see animus).
animus (n.) Look up animus at Dictionary.com
1820, "temper" (usually in a hostile sense), from Latin animus "rational soul, mind, life, mental powers; courage, desire," related to anima "living being, soul, mind, disposition, passion, courage, anger, spirit, feeling," from PIE root *ane- "to blow, to breathe" (cognates: Greek anemos "wind," Sanskrit aniti "breathes," Old Irish anal, Welsh anadl "breath," Old Irish animm "soul," Gothic uzanan "to exhale," Old Norse anda "to breathe," Old English eðian "to breathe," Old Church Slavonic vonja "smell, breath," Armenian anjn "soul"). It has no plural. As a term in Jungian psychology for the masculine component of a feminine personality, it dates from 1923.
anion (n.) Look up anion at Dictionary.com
"a negatively charged ion, which moves toward the anode (q.v.) during electrolysis," 1834, proposed by the Rev. William Whewell (1794-1866), English polymath, and published by English physicist Michael Faraday, from Greek anion "(thing) going up," neuter past participle of anienai "go up," from ana "up" (see ana-) + ienai "go" (see ion).
anise (n.) Look up anise at Dictionary.com
Levantine plant cultivated for its seeds, which were important sources of chemical oils and flavoring, c.1300, from Old French anis (13c.), from Latin anisum, from Greek anison. By the Ancients, somewhat confused with dill.