apotheosize (v.) Look up apotheosize at Dictionary.com
1760; see apotheosis + -ize. Related: Apotheosized; apotheosizing. Earlier in same sense was apotheose (1670s).
apothesis (n.) Look up apothesis at Dictionary.com
1811, from Greek apothesis "a laying up in store; a putting aside," noun of action from apotithenai "to lay aside," from apo- "off, away" (see apo-) + tithenai "to put, place" (see theme).
apotropaic (adj.) Look up apotropaic at Dictionary.com
1883, with -ic + Greek apotropaios "averting evil," from apotrepein "to turn away, avert," from apo- "off, away" (see apo-) + trepein "to turn" (see trope).
app (n.) Look up app at Dictionary.com
computerese shorthand for application, attested by 1992.
Appalachia Look up Appalachia at Dictionary.com
"cultural and geographical region of inland Eastern U.S.," 1880s, from the Appalachian Mountains, which are its core. Earlier Appalachia was proposed as a better name for "United States of America" by Washington Irving in 1839 (though he preferred Alleghenia) and this may have been the coinage of the word.
It is a thousand pities that the puny witticisms of a few professional objectors should have the power to prevent, even for a year, the adoption of a name for our country. At present we have, clearly, none. There should be no hesitation about "Appalachia." In the first place, it is distinctive. "America" is not, and can never be made so. We may legislate as much as we please, and assume for our country whatever name we think right — but to use it will be no name, to any purpose for which a name is needed, unless we can take it away from the regions which employ it at present. South America is "America," and will insist upon remaining so. [Edgar Allan Poe, 1846]
Appalachian Look up Appalachian at Dictionary.com
in reference to the North American mountain range, c.1600, Mountaynes Apalatsi; written apalachen by Spanish explorers and originally in reference only to the southern end of the range. Originally the name of the Apalachee, a Muskogean people of northwestern Florida, perhaps from Apalachee abalahci "other side of the river" or Hitchiti (Muskogean) apalwahči "dwelling on one side." Spelling shifted under influence of adjectives in -ian.
appall (v.) Look up appall at Dictionary.com
also appal, early 14c., "to fade;" c.1400, "to grow pale," from Old French apalir "become or make pale," from a- "to" (see ad-) + palir "grow pale," from Latin pallere (see pallor). Meaning "cause dismay or shock," is 1530s. Related: Appalled; appalling.
appalled (adj.) Look up appalled at Dictionary.com
1570s, "enfeebled;" c.1600, "dismayed;" past participle adjective from appall.
appalling (adj.) Look up appalling at Dictionary.com
1620s, present participle adjective from appall. Colloquial weakened sense of "distasteful" is attested from 1919.
Appaloosa Look up Appaloosa at Dictionary.com
breed of horses favored by Indian tribes in U.S. West, 1849, either from Opelousa in Louisiana or from Palouse Indians, who lived near the river of that name in Idaho, in which case it probably is a Nez Percé word. Opelousa is perhaps from Choctaw api losa "black body;" while Palouse is from Sahaptin palou:s "what is standing up in the water."
appanage (n.) Look up appanage at Dictionary.com
c.1600, from French apanage (13c.), from apaner "to endow with means of subsistence," from Medieval Latin appanare "equip with bread," from ad- "to" (see ad-) + panis "bread" (see food). Originally, provisions made for younger children of royalty. The double -p- restored in French 15c.-16c., in English 17c.
apparat (n.) Look up apparat at Dictionary.com
"administrative machinery of the Communist Party in Russia," 1950, from Russian, from German apparat "apparatus, instrument," from Latin apparatus (see apparatus).
apparatchik (n.) Look up apparatchik at Dictionary.com
"Communist agent or spy," 1941, originally in writings of Arthur Koestler, from Russian, from apparat "political organization" (see apparat). Russian plural is apparatchiki.
apparatus (n.) Look up apparatus at Dictionary.com
1620s, from Latin apparatus "tools, implements, equipment; preparation, a preparing," noun of state from past participle stem of apparare "prepare," from ad- "to" (see ad-) + parare "make ready" (see pare).
apparel (v.) Look up apparel at Dictionary.com
mid-13c., "to equip (in any way)," from Old French apareillier (12c.), from Vulgar Latin *appariculare. This is either from Latin apparare "prepare, make ready" (see apparatus), or from Vulgar Latin *ad-particulare "to put things together." The meaning "to attire in proper clothing" is from mid-14c. Cognate with Italian aparecchiare, Spanish aparejar, Portuguese aparelhar. Related: Appareled; apparelled; appareling; apparelling.
apparel (n.) Look up apparel at Dictionary.com
"personal outfit or attire," early 14c., also "ship's rigging," from Old French apareil "preparation," from apareillier (see apparel (v.)). Earlier in same sense was apparelment (early 14c.).
apparent (adj.) Look up apparent at Dictionary.com
late 14c., from Old French aparant "evident, obvious, visible," from Latin apparentem (nominative apparens) "visible, manifest," present participle of apparere (see appear). First attested in phrase heir apparent (see heir). Meaning "superficial" is c.1400. Apparent magnitude in astronomy (how bright a heavenly body looks from earth, as opposed to absolute magnitude, which is how bright it really is) is attested from 1875.
apparently (adv.) Look up apparently at Dictionary.com
late 14c., "visibly, openly," from apparent + -ly (2). Meaning "evidently" is from 1550s; that of "to all appearances" (but not necessarily "really") is from 1560s; meaning "so far as can be judged, seemingly," is from 1846. A gradual retreat from certainty.
apparition (n.) Look up apparition at Dictionary.com
c.1500, "unclosing" (of Heaven), from Anglo-French aparicion, Old French apparition, aparoison (15c.), used in reference to the Epiphany (revealing of Christ child to the Wise Men), from Late Latin apparitionem (nominative apparitio) "an appearance," also "attendants," in classical Latin "service, servants," noun of action from past participle stem of apparere "appear" (see appear). Meaning "ghost" first recorded c.1600; the shade of sense differentiation between appearance and apparition is that the latter tends to be unexpected or startling.
appeal (v.) Look up appeal at Dictionary.com
early 14c., originally in legal sense of "to call" to a higher judge or court, from Anglo-French apeler "to call upon, accuse," Old French apeler "make an appeal" (11c., Modern French appeler), from Latin appellare "to accost, address, appeal to, summon, name," iterative of appellere "to prepare," from ad- "to" (see ad-) + pellere "to beat, drive" (see pulse (n.1)). Related: Appealed; appealing.

Probably a Roman metaphoric extension of a nautical term for "driving a ship toward a particular landing." Popular modern meaning "to be attractive or pleasing" is quite recent, attested from 1907 (appealing in this sense is from 1891), from the notion of "to address oneself in expectation of a sympathetic response."
appeal (n.) Look up appeal at Dictionary.com
c.1300, in the legal sense, from Old French apel (Modern French appel), back-formation from apeler (see appeal (v.)). Meaning "call to an authority" is from 1620s; that of "attractive power" attested by 1916.
appealing Look up appealing at Dictionary.com
mid-15c. as a noun, "action of petitioning a higher court or authority," verbal noun from appeal (v.). Adjectival sense of "attractive" attested by 1892. Related: Appealingly.
appear (v.) Look up appear at Dictionary.com
late 13c., "to come into view," from stem of Old French aparoir (12c., Modern French apparoir) "appear, come to light, come forth," from Latin apparere "to appear, come in sight, make an appearance," from ad- "to" (see ad-) + parere "to come forth, be visible." Of persons, "present oneself," late 14c. Meaning "seem, have a certain appearance" is late 14c. Related: Appeared; appearing.
appearance (n.) Look up appearance at Dictionary.com
late 14c., "visible state or form, figure; mere show," from Anglo-French apparaunce, Old French aparance "appearance, display, pomp" (13c.), from Latin apparentia, abstract noun from aparentem, past participle of apparere (see appear). Meaning "semblance" is recorded from early 15c.; that of "action of coming into view" is mid-15c. Phrase keep up appearances attested from 1760 (save appearances in same sense is 1711).
appeasable (adj.) Look up appeasable at Dictionary.com
1540s; see appease + -able. Related: Appeasably.
appease (v.) Look up appease at Dictionary.com
c.1300 "to reconcile," from Anglo-French apeser, Old French apaisier "to pacify, make peace, appease, be reconciled, placate" (12c.), from the phrase a paisier "bring to peace," from a "to" (see ad-) + pais, from Latin pacem (nominative pax) "peace" (see peace). Related: Appeased; appeasing.
appeasement (n.) Look up appeasement at Dictionary.com
mid-15c., "pacification," from Middle French apeisement, Old French apaisement "appeasement, calming," noun of action from apaisier (see appease). First recorded 1919 in international political sense; not pejorative until failure of Chamberlain's policy toward Germany in 1939 (Methods of appeasement was Chamberlain's description of his policy).
appeaser (n.) Look up appeaser at Dictionary.com
mid-15c., agent noun from appease (v.). Political sense attested from 1940.
appellant (n.) Look up appellant at Dictionary.com
late 14c., Anglo-French, from Old French apelant, noun use of present participle of apeler, from Latin appellare (see appeal).
appellate (adj.) Look up appellate at Dictionary.com
"pertaining to appeals," 1726, from Latin appellatus, past participle of appellare (see appeal). Appellate jurisdiction is in Blackstone (1768).
appellation (n.) Look up appellation at Dictionary.com
late 15c., "action of appealing" (to a higher authority), from Old French apelacion (13c.), from Latin appellationem (nominative appellatio) "an addressing, accosting; an appeal; a name, title," noun of action from past participle stem of appellare (see appeal). Meaning "designation, name given to a person, thing, or class" is from mid-15c., from a sense also found in Middle French appeler.
appellative (adj.) Look up appellative at Dictionary.com
mid-15c., from Latin appellativus, from appellat-, past participle stem of appellare (see appeal). As a noun, attested from 1590s.
appellee (n.) Look up appellee at Dictionary.com
1530s, from Anglo-French (late 14c.), from Old French apelé (Modern French appelé) "accused, defendant," noun use of past participle of appeler "to call, address;" see appeal + -ee.
append (v.) Look up append at Dictionary.com
late 14c., "to belong to as a possession or right," from Old French apendre (13c.) belong, be dependent (on); attach (oneself) to; hang, hang up," and directly from Latin appendere "to cause to hang (from something), weigh," from ad- "to" (see ad-) + pendere "hang" (see pendant).

Meaning "to hang on, attach as a pendant" is 1640s; that of "attach as an appendix" is recorded by 1843. OED says the original word was obsolete by c.1500, and these later transitive senses represent a reborrowing from Latin or French. Related: Appended; appending.
appendage (n.) Look up appendage at Dictionary.com
1640s, from append + -age.
appendectomy (n.) Look up appendectomy at Dictionary.com
1891, a hybrid from appendix + -ectomy.
appendices (n.) Look up appendices at Dictionary.com
proper Latin plural of appendix.
appendicitis (n.) Look up appendicitis at Dictionary.com
1886, from Latin stem of appendix + -itis.
appendicular (adj.) Look up appendicular at Dictionary.com
1650s, from Latin appendicula, diminutive of appendix + -ar.
appendix (n.) Look up appendix at Dictionary.com
1540s, "subjoined addition to a document or book," from Latin appendix "an addition, continuation, something attached," from appendere (see append). Used for "small outgrowth of an internal organ" from 1610s, especially in reference to the vermiform appendix. This sense perhaps from or influenced by French appendix, where the term was in use from 1540s.
apperceive (v.) Look up apperceive at Dictionary.com
c.1300, from Old French apercevoir (see apperception). In modern psychological use, a back-formation from apperception. Related: Apperceived; apperceiving.
apperception (n.) Look up apperception at Dictionary.com
1753, from French aperception (17c.), from German Apperzeption (or Latin apperceptionem), coined by German mathematician and philosopher Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz (1646-1716) as noun corresponding to French apercevoir "perceive, notice, become aware of" (11c., from Latin ad "to" (see ad-) + percipere; see perceive) on analogy of Perzeption/percevoir.
appertain (v.) Look up appertain at Dictionary.com
late 14c., from Anglo-French apartenir, Old French apartenir (12c.) "be related to; be incumbent upon," from Late Latin appertinere "to pertain to," from ad- "to, completely" (see ad-) + pertinere "to belong to" (see pertain). To belong as parts to the whole, or as members to a family or class. Related: Appertained; appertaining.
appetence (n.) Look up appetence at Dictionary.com
"strong desire," c.1600, from French appétence "desire," from Latin appetentia "longing after something," noun of state from appetentem (nominative appetens), present participle of appetere, from ad "to" (see ad-) + petere "to seek, request" (see petition (n.)).
appetite (n.) Look up appetite at Dictionary.com
c.1300, "craving for food," from Anglo-French appetit, Old French apetit (13c.) "appetite, desire, eagerness," from Latin appetitus "appetite," literally "desire toward," from appetitus, past participle of appetere "to long for, desire; strive for, grasp at," from ad- "to" (see ad-) + petere "go to, seek out" (see petition (n.)).

Of other desires or cravings, from late 14c. As an adjective form, OED lists appetitious (1650s) and appetitual (1610s) as "obsolete," but appetitive (1570s) continues.
appetize (v.) Look up appetize at Dictionary.com
"make hungry," 1782 (implied in appetized), irregularly formed (on model of verbs in -ize) from appetite, or else a back-formation from appetizing.
appetizer (n.) Look up appetizer at Dictionary.com
"something taken to whet the appetite," 1820, agent noun from appetize.
appetizing (adj.) Look up appetizing at Dictionary.com
"exciting desire or hunger," 1650s, from appetite on model of present participle adjective forms in -ing.
Appian Way Look up Appian Way at Dictionary.com
road between Rome and Capua, so called because it was begun (302 B.C.E.) by the consul Appius Claudius Caecus.
applaud (v.) Look up applaud at Dictionary.com
late 15c. (implied in applauding), "to express agreement or approval; to praise," from Latin applaudere "to clap the hands in approbation, to approve by clapping hands; to strike upon, beat," from ad "to" (see ad-) + plaudere "to clap" (see plaudit). Sense of "express approval of" is from 1590s; that of "to clap the hands" is from 1590s. Figurative sense arrived in English before literal. Related: Applauded; applauding.