boo-boo (n.) Look up boo-boo at Dictionary.com
"mistake," 1954, apparently a reduplication of boob, which had acquired a secondary sense of "foolish mistake" (1934).
boo-hoo Look up boo-hoo at Dictionary.com
also boohoo, 1520s, originally of laughter or weeping (now only of weeping); see boo.
boo-ya Look up boo-ya at Dictionary.com
also booyah, exclamation used in various situations, first attested c. 1990 in hip-hop slang.
boob (n.) Look up boob at Dictionary.com
"stupid person," 1909, American English slang, perhaps from booby.
boob tube (n.) Look up boob tube at Dictionary.com
"television set," U.S. slang, by 1965, from boob "stupid person" + slang tube (n.) "television, television programming," because the sets really did have vacuum tubes in them once upon a time.
boobs (n.) Look up boobs at Dictionary.com
"breasts," 1929, U.S. slang, probably from much older term boobies (late 17c.), related to 17c. bubby; perhaps ultimately from Latin puppa, literally "little girl," hence, in child-talk, "breast." Or else it is a natural formation in English (compare French poupe "teat," German dialectal Bubbi, etc.).
booby (n.) Look up booby at Dictionary.com
1590s, from Spanish bobo "stupid person, slow bird" (used of various ungainly seabirds), probably from Latin balbus "stammering," from an imitative root (see barbarian).

Booby prize is by 1883: an object of little value given to the loser of a game; booby trap is 1850, originally a schoolboy prank; the more lethal sense developed during World War I.
At the end of every session the dominie had the satirical custom of presenting his tawse as a "booby-prize" to some idle or stupid lout whom he picked out as meriting this distinction so that next time they met he might start fresh and fair with new pair for a new set of classes. [Ascott R. Hope, "Dumps," "Young England" magazine, 1883]
boodle (n.) Look up boodle at Dictionary.com
1833, "crowd;" 1858, "phony money," especially "graft money," actual or potential (1883), both American English slang, either or both based on bundle, or from Dutch boedel "property."
booger (n.) Look up booger at Dictionary.com
"nasal mucus," by 1890s; earlier bugger. Also boogie.
boogie (v.) Look up boogie at Dictionary.com
originally "dance to boogie music," a late 1960s style of rock music based on blues chords, from earlier boogie, a style of blues (1941, also as a verb), short for boogie-woogie (1928), a reduplication of boogie (1917), which meant "rent party" in American English slang. A song title, "That Syncopated Boogie-boo," appears in a copyright listing from 1912.
book (v.) Look up book at Dictionary.com
Old English bocian "to grant or assign by charter," from book (n.). Meaning "to enter into a book, record" is early 13c. Meaning "to enter for a seat or place, issue (railway) tickets" is from 1841; "to engage a performer as a guest" is from 1872. U.S. student slang meaning "to depart hastily, go fast" is by 1977, of uncertain signification. Related: Booked; booking.
book (n.) Look up book at Dictionary.com
Old English boc "book, writing, written document," traditionally from Proto-Germanic *bokiz "beech" (source also of German Buch "book" Buche "beech;" see beech), the notion being of beechwood tablets on which runes were inscribed, but it may be from the tree itself (people still carve initials in them). The Old English word originally meant any written document. Latin and Sanskrit also have words for "writing" that are based on tree names ("birch" and "ash," respectively). And compare French livre "book," from Latin librum, originally "the inner bark of trees" (see library). Meaning "libretto of an opera" is from 1768. A betting book is from 1856.
bookbinder (n.) Look up bookbinder at Dictionary.com
late 14c, from book (n.) + binder. Related: Bookbindery.
bookcase (n.) Look up bookcase at Dictionary.com
1726, from book (n.) + case (n.2). An Old English word for this was bocfodder.
bookie (n.) Look up bookie at Dictionary.com
1885, colloquial shortening of bookmaker in the wagering sense.
bookish (adj.) Look up bookish at Dictionary.com
1560s, "literary," from book (n.) + -ish. In sense of "overly studious" it is recorded from 1590s. Related: Bookishly; bookishness.
bookkeeper (n.) Look up bookkeeper at Dictionary.com
also book-keeper, 1550s, from book (n.) + keeper. A rare English word with three consecutive double letters. Related: Bookkeeping, which is from 1680s in the sense "the work of keeping account books;" book-keep (v.) is a back-formation from 1886.
booklet (n.) Look up booklet at Dictionary.com
1859, from book (n.) + diminutive ending -let.
bookmaker (n.) Look up bookmaker at Dictionary.com
also book-maker, 1510s, "printer and binder of books," from book (n.) + agent noun from make (v.). The wagering sense is from 1862. Related: Book-making (late 15c., betting sense 1824).
bookmark (n.) Look up bookmark at Dictionary.com
also book-mark, 1840, from book (n.) + mark (n.1). Bookmarker is older (1838). As a verb, by 1900. Related: Bookmarked; bookmarking.
bookstore (n.) Look up bookstore at Dictionary.com
1763, from book (n.) + store (n.).
bookworm (n.) Look up bookworm at Dictionary.com
1590s (of people), 1855 of insects or maggots; there is no single species known by this name, which is applied to the anolium beetle, silverfishes, and book lice. See book (n.) + worm (n.).
Boolean (adj.) Look up Boolean at Dictionary.com
in reference to abstract algebraic systems, 1851, named for George Boole (1815-1864), English mathematician. The surname is a variant of Bull.
boom (n.2) Look up boom at Dictionary.com
in the business sense, 1873, sometimes said to be from boom (n.1), from the nautical meaning "a long spar run out to extend the foot of a sail" -- a ship "booming" being one in full sail. But it could just as well be from boom (v.) on the notion of "suddenness."
boom (v.) Look up boom at Dictionary.com
mid-15c., earliest use was for bees and wasps, probably echoic of humming. The meaning "make a loud noise" is 15c. Compare bomb. Meaning "to burst into prosperity" (of places, businesses, etc.) is 1871, American English. Related: Boomed; booming. Boom box first attested 1978.
boom (n.1) Look up boom at Dictionary.com
"long pole," 1540s, from Scottish boun, borrowed from Dutch boom "tree, pole, beam," from a Middle Dutch word analogous to Old English beam (see beam (n.)).
boomerang (v.) Look up boomerang at Dictionary.com
1880, from boomerang (n.).
boomerang (n.) Look up boomerang at Dictionary.com
1827, adapted from an extinct Aboriginal languages of New South Wales, Australia. Another variant, perhaps, was wo-mur-rang (1798).
boon (n.) Look up boon at Dictionary.com
late 12c., bone "petition," from Old Norse bon "a petition, prayer," from Proto-Germanic *boniz (source also of Old English ben "prayer, petition," bannan "to summon;" see ban).
boon (adj.) Look up boon at Dictionary.com
in boon companion (1560s), only real survival of Middle English boon "good" (early 14c.), from Old French bon (see bon).
boondocks (n.) Look up boondocks at Dictionary.com
1910s, from Tagalog bundok "mountain." Adopted by occupying American soldiers in the Philippines for "remote and wild place." Reinforced or re-adopted during World War II. Hence, also boondockers "shoes suited for rough terrain," originally (1944) U.S. services slang word for field boots.
boondoggle (n.) Look up boondoggle at Dictionary.com
1935, American English, of uncertain origin, popularized during the New Deal as a contemptuous word for make-work projects for the unemployed. Said to have been a pioneer word for "gadget;" it also was by 1932 a Boy Scout term for a kind of woven braid.
boonies (n.) Look up boonies at Dictionary.com
colloquial shortening of boondocks; by 1964, originally among U.S. troops in Vietnam War (in reference to the rural areas of the country, as opposed to Saigon).
boor (n.) Look up boor at Dictionary.com
13c., from Old French bovier "herdsman," from Latin bovis, genitive of bos "cow, ox." Re-introduced 16c. from Dutch boer, from Middle Dutch gheboer "fellow dweller," from Proto-Germanic *buram "dweller," especially "farmer," from PIE *bhu-, from root *bheue- (see be). Original meaning was "peasant farmer" (compare German Bauer, Dutch boer, Danish bonde), and in English it was at first applied to agricultural laborers in or from other lands, as opposed to the native yeoman; negative connotation attested by 1560s (in boorish), from notion of clownish rustics. Related: Boorishness.
boorish (adj.) Look up boorish at Dictionary.com
1560s, from boor (n.) + -ish. Related: Boorishly; boorishness.
boost (v.) Look up boost at Dictionary.com
1815, literal and figurative, American English, of unknown origin. Related: Boosted; boosting. As a noun by 1825.
booster (n.) Look up booster at Dictionary.com
1890, "one who boosts" something, agent noun from boost (v.). Electrical sense is recorded from 1894. Young child's booster chair is attested under that name from 1960.
boot (v.1) Look up boot at Dictionary.com
"to kick," 1877, American English, from boot (n.1). Generalized sense of "eject, kick out" is from 1880. Related: Booted; booting.
boot (n.1) Look up boot at Dictionary.com
footwear, early 14c., from Old French bote "boot" (12c.), with corresponding words in Provençal and Spanish, of unknown origin, perhaps from a Germanic source. Originally for riding boots only. An old Dorsetshire word for "half-boots" was skilty-boots [Halliwell, Wright].
boot (n.2) Look up boot at Dictionary.com
"profit, use," Old English bot "help, relief, advantage; atonement," literally "a making better," from Proto-Germanic *boto (see better (adj.)). Compare German Buße "penance, atonement," Gothic botha "advantage." Now mostly in phrase to boot (Old English to bote).
boot (v.2) Look up boot at Dictionary.com
"start up a computer," 1975, from bootstrap (v.), a 1958 derived verb from bootstrap (n.) in the computer sense.
boot camp (n.) Look up boot camp at Dictionary.com
by 1941, U.S. Marines slang, said to be from boot (n.) as slang for "recruit," which supposedly dates from the Spanish-American War and is a synecdoche from boots, leggings worn by U.S. sailors.
boot-licker (n.) Look up boot-licker at Dictionary.com
also bootlicker, "toady, servile follower," 1846, from boot (n.1) + agent noun from lick (v.). Foot-licker in the same sense is from 1610s.
booth (n.) Look up booth at Dictionary.com
mid-12c., from Old Danish boþ "temporary dwelling," from East Norse *boa "to dwell," from Proto-Germanic *bowan-, from PIE root *bheue- "to be, exist, grow" (see be). See also bound (adj.2). Compare German Bude "booth, stall," Middle Dutch boode, Lithuanian butas "house," Old Irish both "hut," Bohemian bouda, Polish buda, some probably borrowed from East Norse, some formed from the PIE root.
bootleg (n.) Look up bootleg at Dictionary.com
"leg of a boot," 1630s, from boot (n.1) + leg (n.). As an adjective in reference to illegal liquor, 1889, American English slang, from the trick of concealing a flask of liquor down the leg of a high boot. Before that the bootleg was the place to secret knives and pistols.
bootlegger (n.) Look up bootlegger at Dictionary.com
1889, from bootleg (q.v.). The word enjoyed great popularity in the U.S. during Prohibition (1920-1933), and the abstracted element -legger was briefly active in word-formation, e.g. meatlegger during World War II rationing, booklegger for those who imported banned titles such as "Ulysses."
bootlegging (n.) Look up bootlegging at Dictionary.com
also boot-legging, 1890, from bootleg (q.v.).
bootless (adj.1) Look up bootless at Dictionary.com
"lacking boots," late 14c., from boot (n.1) + -less.
bootless (adj.2) Look up bootless at Dictionary.com
late Old English botleas "unpardonable, not to be atoned for, without help or remedy," from boot (n.2) + -less. Meaning "useless, unprofitable" is from early 15c.
bootstrap (n.) Look up bootstrap at Dictionary.com
also boot-strap, tab or loop at the back of the top of a men's boot, which the wearer hooked a finger through to pull the boots on, 1870, from boot (n.) + strap (n.).

Circa 1900, to pull (oneself) up by (one's) bootstraps was used figuratively of an impossible task (Among the "practical questions" at the end of chapter one of Steele's "Popular Physics" schoolbook (1888) is, "30. Why can not a man lift himself by pulling up on his boot-straps?"). By 1916 its meaning expanded to include "better oneself by rigorous, unaided effort." The meaning "fixed sequence of instructions to load the operating system of a computer" (1953) is from the notion of the first-loaded program pulling itself, and the rest, up by the bootstrap.