casserole (n.) Look up casserole at Dictionary.com
1706, "stew pan," from French casserole "sauce pan" (16c.), diminutive of Middle French casse "pan" (14c.), from Provençal cassa "melting pan," from Medieval Latin cattia "pan, vessel," possibly from Greek kyathion, diminutive of kyathos "cup for the wine bowl." Originally the pan, since c. 1930 also of the dishes cooked in it, via cookery phrases such as en casserole, à la casserole.
cassette (n.) Look up cassette at Dictionary.com
1793, "little box," from French cassette, from Middle French casset, diminutive of Old North French casse "box" (see case (n.2)). Meaning "magnetic tape recorder cartridge" is from 1960.
cassia (n.) Look up cassia at Dictionary.com
cinnamon-like plant, late Old English, from Latin cassia, from Greek kasia, from Hebrew q'tsi-ah "cassia," from qatsa "to cut off, strip off bark."
Cassiopeia (n.) Look up Cassiopeia at Dictionary.com
northern constellation, in Greek mythology queen of Ethiopia and mother of Andromeda, from Latinized form of Greek Kassiepeia, Kassiopeia, of unknown etymology. Related: Cassiopeian.
cassis (n.) Look up cassis at Dictionary.com
black currant liquor, 1907, from French cassis (16c.) "black currant," apparently from Latin cassia (see cassia). The modern liqueur dates from mid-19c.
Cassius Look up Cassius at Dictionary.com
Roman gens, one of the oldest families of Rome. The conspirator against Caesar was C. Cassius Longinus.
cassock (n.) Look up cassock at Dictionary.com
1540s, "long loose gown," from Middle French casaque "long coat" (16c.), probably ultimately from Turkish quzzak "nomad, adventurer," (the source of Cossack), from their typical riding coat. Or perhaps from Arabic kazagand, from Persian kazhagand "padded coat," from kazh "raw silk" + agand "stuffed." Chiefly a soldier's cloak 16c.-17c.; ecclesiastical use is from 1660s.
cassowary (n.) Look up cassowary at Dictionary.com
1610s, via French or Dutch, from Malay (Austronesian) kasuari.
cast (v.) Look up cast at Dictionary.com
c. 1200, "to throw, fling, hurl," from a Scandinavian source akin to Old Norse kasta "to throw" (cognate with Swedish kasta, Danish kaste, North Frisian kastin), of uncertain origin. Meaning "to form in a mold" is late 15c. In the sense of "to throw" it replaced Old English weorpan (see warp (v.)), and itself largely has been superseded now by throw, though cast still is used of fishing lines and glances. Meaning "calculate, find by reckoning; chart (a course)" is from c. 1300.
cast (n.) Look up cast at Dictionary.com
mid-13c., "a throw, an act of throwing," from cast (v.). In early use especially of dice, hence figurative uses relating to fortune or fate. Meaning "that which is cast" is from c. 1550s. Meaning "dash or shade of color" is from c. 1600. The sense of "a throw" carried an idea of "the form the thing takes after it has been thrown," which led to widespread and varied meanings, such as "group of actors in a play" (1630s). OED finds 42 distinct noun meaning and 83 verbal ones, with many sub-definitions. Many of the figurative senses converged in a general meaning "sort, kind, style" (mid-17c.). A cast in the eye (early 14c.) preserves the older verbal sense of "warp, turn."
cast iron (n.) Look up cast iron at Dictionary.com
1660s, from cast "made by melting and being left to harden in a mold" (1530s), past participle adjective from cast (v.) in its sense "to throw something (in a particular way)," c. 1300, especially "form metal into a shape by pouring it molten" (1510s). From 1690s as an adjective, cast-iron.
cast-off (n.) Look up cast-off at Dictionary.com
1741, from verbal phrase (c. 1400), from cast (v.) + off (adv.). From 1746 as a past participle adjective.
castanet (n.) Look up castanet at Dictionary.com
usually castanets, 1640s, from French castagnette or directly from Spanish castañeta diminutive of castaña "chestnut," from Latin castanea (see chestnut).
castaway (n.) Look up castaway at Dictionary.com
late 15c., "one who is rejected," from the verbal phrase (c. 1300, literal and figurative), from cast (v.) + away (adv.). Specific sense "one adrift at sea" is from 1799. The adjective is first recorded 1540s.
caste (n.) Look up caste at Dictionary.com
1550s, "a race of men," from Latin castus "chaste," from castus "cut off, separated; pure" (via notion of "cut off" from faults), past participle of carere "to be cut off from" (and related to castration), from PIE *kas-to-, from root *kes- "to cut" (source also of Latin cassus "empty, void"). Originally spelled cast in English and later often merged with cast (n.) in its secondary sense "sort, kind, style."

Application to Hindu social groups was picked up by English in India 1610s from Portuguese casta "breed, race, caste," earlier casta raça, "unmixed race," from the same Latin word. The current spelling of of the English word is from this reborrowing. Caste system is first recorded 1840.
castellan (n.) Look up castellan at Dictionary.com
late 14c., from Old North French castelain (Modern French châtelaine; see chatelaine).
castellated (adj.) Look up castellated at Dictionary.com
"furnished with turrets and battlements," 1670s, from Medieval Latin castellatus "built like a castle," past participle of castellare "to fortify as a castle," from Latin castellum "fort" (see castle (n.)). Related: Castellation.
caster (n.1) Look up caster at Dictionary.com
also sometimes castor, "person or thing that casts," late 14c., agent noun from cast (v.). Meaning "pepper shaker, small perforated container" is from 1670s, on notion of "throwing."
caster (n.2) Look up caster at Dictionary.com
"wheel and swivel attached to furniture," 1748, agent noun from cast (v.) in the old sense of "turn." Also sometimes castor.
castigate (v.) Look up castigate at Dictionary.com
c. 1600, from Latin castigatus, past participle of castigare "to correct, set right; purify; chastise, punish," from castus "pure" (see caste) + agere "to do" (from PIE root *ag- "to drive, draw out or forth, move"). The notion behind the word is "make someone pure by correction or reproof."
If thou didst put this soure cold habit on To castigate thy pride, 'twere well. [Shakespeare, "Timon" IV.iii (1607)]
Related: Castigated; castigating; castigator; castigatory.
castigation (n.) Look up castigation at Dictionary.com
late 14c., castigacioun, from Latin castigationem (nominative castigatio) "a correcting, reproof, chastizing," noun of action from past participle stem of castigare "to correct, set right; purify" (see castigate).
Castile Look up Castile at Dictionary.com
medieval Spanish county and later kingdom, from Vulgar Latin castilla, from Latin castella, plural of castellum "castle, fort, citadel, stronghold" (see castle (n.)); so called in reference to the many fortified places there during the Moorish wars. The name in Spanish is said to date back to c.800. Related: Castilian. As a fine kind of soap, in English from 1610s.
casting (n.) Look up casting at Dictionary.com
c. 1300, "a throwing; late 14c., "a metal casting, a product of a cast;" verbal noun from cast (v.). Theatrical sense is from 1814. Casting couch in the naughty-Hollywood sense is from 1948.
castle (n.) Look up castle at Dictionary.com
late Old English castel "village" (this sense from a biblical usage in Vulgar Latin); later "large fortified building, stronghold," in this sense from Old North French castel (Old French chastel, 12c.; Modern French château), from Latin castellum "a castle, fort, citadel, stronghold; fortified village," diminutive of castrum "fort," from Proto-Italic *kastro- "part, share;" cognate with Old Irish cather, Welsh caer "town" (and perhaps related to castrare via notion of "cut off;" see caste). In early bibles, castle was used to translate Greek kome "village."

This word also had come to Old English as ceaster and formed the -caster and -chester in place names. Spanish alcazar "castle" is from Arabic al-qasr, from Latin castrum. Castles in Spain translates 14c. French chastel en Espaigne (the imaginary castles sometimes stood in Brie, Asia, or Albania) and probably reflects the hopes of landless knights to establish themselves abroad. The statement that an (English) man's home is his castle is from 16c.
castle (v.) Look up castle at Dictionary.com
move in chess, recorded under this name from 1650s, from castle (n.), as an old alternative name for the rook, one of the pieces moved. Related: Castled; castling.
castor (n.) Look up castor at Dictionary.com
late 14c., "beaver," from Old French castor (13c.), from Latin castor "beaver," from Greek kastor "beaver," literally "he who excels," also the name of one of the divine twins (with Pollux), worshipped by women in ancient Greece as a healer and preserver from disease.

His name was given to secretions of the animal (Latin castoreum), which were used medicinally in ancient times. (Through this association his name replaced the native Latin word for "beaver," which was fiber.) In English, castor is attested in this sense from c. 1600. Modern castor oil is first recorded 1746; it is made from seeds of the plant Ricinus communis but supposedly possesses the laxative qualities (and taste) of beaver juice.
castrate (v.) Look up castrate at Dictionary.com
1610s (implied in castrated), back-formation from castration (q.v.), or from Latin castratus, past participle of castrare. The figurative sense is attested earlier (1550s). Related: Castrating.
castrati (n.) Look up castrati at Dictionary.com
plural of castrato.
castration (n.) Look up castration at Dictionary.com
early 15c., castracioun, from Latin castrationem (nominative castratio), noun of action from past participle stem of castrare "to castrate, emasculate," supposedly from a noun *castrum "knife, instrument that cuts," from PIE root *kes- "to cut" (see caste). Freud's castration complex is attested from 1914 in English (translating German Kastrationsangst).
castrato (n.) Look up castrato at Dictionary.com
1763, from Italian castrato, from Latin castratus (see castration).
casual (adj.) Look up casual at Dictionary.com
late 14c., "subject to or produced by chance," from Middle French casuel (15c.), from Late Latin casualis "by chance," from Latin casus "chance, occasion, opportunity; accident, event" (see case (n.1)).

Of persons, in the sense of "not to be depended on, unmethodical," it is attested from 1883; meaning "showing lack of interest" is from 1916. Of clothes, "informal," from 1939. Related: Casually.
casualness (n.) Look up casualness at Dictionary.com
1730, from casual (adj.) + -ness.
casualty (n.) Look up casualty at Dictionary.com
early 15c., "chance, accident; incidental charge," from casual (adj.) on model of royalty, penalty, etc. Casuality had some currency 16c.-17c. but is now obsolete. Meaning "losses in numbers from a military or other troop" is from late 15c. Meaning "an individual killed, wounded, or lost in battle" is from 1844.
casuist (n.) Look up casuist at Dictionary.com
c. 1600, "one who studies and resolves cases of conscience," from French casuiste (17c.) or Spanish casuista (the French word also might be from Spanish), Italian casista, all from Latin casus (see case (n.1)) in its Medieval Latin sense "case of conscience." Often since 17c. in a sinister or contemptuous sense. Related: Casuistic; casuistical; casuistically; casuistry.
Casuistry ... destroys, by distinctions and exceptions, all morality, and effaces the essential difference between right and wrong. [Bolingbroke, 1736]
casus belli (n.) Look up casus belli at Dictionary.com
an act justifying war, 1849, from Latin casus "case" (see case (n.1)) + belli, genitive of bellum "war" (see bellicose).
CAT Look up CAT at Dictionary.com
1975, medical acronym for computerized axial tomography or something like it. Related: CAT scan.
cat (n.) Look up cat at Dictionary.com
Old English catt (c. 700), from West Germanic (c. 400-450), from Proto-Germanic *kattuz (source also of Old Frisian katte, Old Norse köttr, Dutch kat, Old High German kazza, German Katze), from Late Latin cattus.

The near-universal European word now, it appeared in Europe as Latin catta (Martial, c. 75 C.E.), Byzantine Greek katta (c. 350) and was in general use on the continent by c. 700, replacing Latin feles. Probably ultimately Afro-Asiatic (compare Nubian kadis, Berber kadiska, both meaning "cat"). Arabic qitt "tomcat" may be from the same source. Cats were domestic in Egypt from c. 2000 B.C.E., but not a familiar household animal to classical Greeks and Romans. The nine lives have been proverbial since at least 1560s.

The Late Latin word also is the source of Old Irish and Gaelic cat, Welsh kath, Breton kaz, Italian gatto, Spanish gato, French chat (12c.). Independent, but ultimately from the same source are words in the Slavic group: Old Church Slavonic kotuka, kotel'a, Bulgarian kotka, Russian koška, Polish kot, along with Lithuanian kate and non-Indo-European Finnish katti, which is from Lithuanian.

Extended to lions, tigers, etc. c. 1600. As a term of contempt for a woman, from early 13c. Slang sense of "prostitute" is from at least c. 1400. Slang sense of "fellow, guy," is from 1920, originally in African-American vernacular; narrower sense of "jazz enthusiast" is recorded from 1931.

Cat's paw (1769, but cat's foot in the same sense, 1590s) refers to old folk tale in which the monkey tricks the cat into pawing chestnuts from a fire; the monkey gets the nuts, the cat gets a burnt paw. Cat bath "hurried or partial cleaning" is from 1953. Cat burglar is from 1907, so called for stealth. Cat-witted "small-minded, obstinate, and spiteful" (1670s) deserved to survive. For Cat's meow, cat's pajamas, see bee's knees. For let the cat out of the bag, see bag (n.).
cat-o'-nine-tails (n.) Look up cat-o'-nine-tails at Dictionary.com
1690s, probably so called in reference to its "claws." It was a legal instrument of punishment in British Navy until 1881.
cata- Look up cata- at Dictionary.com
word-forming element from Latinized form of Greek kata-, before vowels kat-, from kata "down, downward, down from, down to," from PIE *kmt- "down, with, along" (source also of Hittite kattan (adv.) "below, underneath," katta "along with"). Occasionally in Greek it had senses of "against" (catapult) or "wrongly" (catachresis), also "along, through, over, across, concerning." Also sometimes used as an intensive or with a sense of completion of action (catalogue). Very active in ancient Greek, this prefix is found in English mostly in words borrowed through Latin after c. 1500.
catabolic (adj.) Look up catabolic at Dictionary.com
1876; see catabolism + -ic.
catabolism (n.) Look up catabolism at Dictionary.com
1876, katabolism, "destructive metabolism," from Greek katabole "a throwing down" (also "a foundation"), from kataballein "to throw down," from kata "down" (see cata-) + ballein "to throw" (from PIE root *gwele- "to throw, reach"). Barnhart says probably formed in English on the model of metabolism. Spelling Latinized from 1889.
catachresis (n.) Look up catachresis at Dictionary.com
1580s, from Latin catachresis, from Greek katakhresis "misuse" (of a word), from katakhresthai "to misuse," from kata "down" (here with a sense of "perversion;" see cata-) + khresthai "to use" (from PIE root *gher- (2) "to like, want"). Related: Catachrestic; catachrestical; catachrestically.
cataclysm (n.) Look up cataclysm at Dictionary.com
1630s, from French cataclysme (16c.), from Latin cataclysmos or directly from Greek kataklysmos "deluge, flood, inundation," from kataklyzein "to deluge," from kata "down" (see cata-) + klyzein "to wash," from PIE *kleue- "to wash, clean" (see cloaca).
cataclysmic (adj.) Look up cataclysmic at Dictionary.com
1837, from cataclysm + -ic. Related: Cataclysmical (1857); cataclysmically.
catacomb (n.) Look up catacomb at Dictionary.com
usually catacombs, from Old English catacumbas, from Late Latin (400 C.E.) catacumbae (plural), originally the region of underground tombs between the 2nd and 3rd milestones of the Appian Way (where the bodies of apostles Paul and Peter, among others, were said to have been laid), origin obscure, perhaps once a proper name, or dissimilation from Latin cata tumbas "at the graves," from cata- "among" + tumbas. accusative plural of tumba "tomb" (see tomb).

If so, the word perhaps was altered by influence of Latin -cumbere "to lie." From the same source are French catacombe, Italian catacomba, Spanish catacumba. Extended by 1836 in English to any subterranean receptacle of the dead (as in Paris). Related: Catacumbal.
catafalque (n.) Look up catafalque at Dictionary.com
1640s, from French catafalque (17c.), from Italian catafalco "scaffold," from Vulgar Latin *catafalicum, from Greek kata- "down" (see cata-), used in Medieval Latin with a sense of "beside, alongside" + fala "scaffolding, wooden siege tower," a word said to be of Etruscan origin. The Medieval Latin word also yielded Old French chaffaut, chafaud (Modern French échafaud) "scaffold."
Catalan (adj.) Look up Catalan at Dictionary.com
"pertaining to Catalonia," also as a noun, "person from Catalonia," late 15c., from the indigenous name, which is said to be of Celtic origin and probably means "chiefs of battle." As a noun meaning "a Catalan," Middle English used Catelaner (mid-14c.), Catellain (early 15c., from French). As a language name in English by 1792. Related: Catalonian (1707).
catalectic (adj.) Look up catalectic at Dictionary.com
1580s, in a line of verse, "wanting an unaccented syllable in the last foot," from Late Latin catalecticus, from Greek katalektikos "leaving off," from kata "down" (see cata-) + legein "to leave off, cease from," from PIE root *sleg- "be slack, be languid." A complete line is said to be acatalectic.
catalepsy (n.) Look up catalepsy at Dictionary.com
late 14c., cathalempsia, from Medieval Latin catalepsia, from Late Latin catalepsis, from Greek katalepsis "a seizure, a seizing upon, a taking possession," from kataleptos "seized," from katalambanein "to seize upon," from kata "down" (see cata-) + lambanein "to take" (see lemma).
cataleptic (adj.) Look up cataleptic at Dictionary.com
1680s, from Late Latin catalepticus, from Greek kataleptikos, from kataleptos (see catalepsy). The noun meaning "one affected by catalepsy" is from 1851.