caucus (v.) Look up caucus at Dictionary.com
1850, from caucus (n.), but caucusing is attested from 1788.
caudal (adj.) Look up caudal at Dictionary.com
1660s, from Latin cauda "tail of an animal," which is of unknown origin, + -al (1).
caudillo (n.) Look up caudillo at Dictionary.com
dictator in Spain or Latin America, 1852, from Spanish caudillo, cabdillo "leader, chief," from Late Latin capitellum, diminutive of caput (genitive capitis) "head" (from PIE root *kaput- "head"). Later in Spain taken by Franco as a title in imitation of German Führer, Italian Duce.
caudle (n.) Look up caudle at Dictionary.com
"hot drink," late 13c., from Old North French caudel (Old French chaudel, 12c., Modern French chaudeau), from Medieval Latin caldellum, diminutive of caldum, neuter of Latin caldus "warm" (from PIE root *kele- (1) "warm").
caught Look up caught at Dictionary.com
past tense and past participle of catch (v.), attested from 14c., predominant after c. 1800, replacing earlier catched. A rare instance of English strong verb with a French origin. This might have been by influence of Middle English lacchen (see latch (v.)), which also then meant "to catch" and was a synonym of catch (as their noun forms remain), and which then had past tense forms lahte, lauhte, laught. The influence happened before latch switched to its modern weak conjugation.
caul (n.) Look up caul at Dictionary.com
early 14c., "close-fitting cap worn by women," from French cale "cap," back-formation from calotte, from Italian callotta, from Latin calautica "type of female headdress with pendent lappets," a foreign word of unknown origin. Medical use, in reference to various membranes, dates to late 14c. Especially of the amnion enclosing the fetus before birth from 1540s. This, if the child is born draped in it, was supersititously supposed to protect against drowning (cauls were advertised for sale in British newspapers through World War I).
cauldron (n.) Look up cauldron at Dictionary.com
"very large kettle or boiler," c. 1300, caudron, from Anglo-French caudrun, Old North French cauderon (Old French chauderon "cauldron, kettle"), from augmentative of Late Latin caldaria "cooking pot" (source of Spanish calderon, Italian calderone), from Latin calidarium "hot bath," from calidus "warm, hot" (from PIE root *kele- (1) "warm"). The -l- was inserted 15c. in imitation of Latin.
cauliflower (n.) Look up cauliflower at Dictionary.com
1590s, originally cole florye, from Italian cavoli fiori "flowered cabbage," plural of cavolo "cabbage" + fiore "flower" (from Latin flora, from PIE root *bhel- (3) "to thrive, bloom").

First element is from Latin caulis "cabbage" (originally "stem, stalk") which was borrowed into Germanic and is the source of cole in cole-slaw and of Scottish kale. The front end of the word was re-Latinized from 18c.; the back end was influenced by flower (n.). The boxer's cauliflower ear is from 1907.
cauline (adj.) Look up cauline at Dictionary.com
"pertaining to or growing on a stem," 1756, from Latin caulis "stalk" (see cole).
caulis (n.) Look up caulis at Dictionary.com
"stem or stalk of a plant," Latin; see cole.
caulk (v.) Look up caulk at Dictionary.com
late 14c., "to stop up crevices or cracks," from Old North French cauquer, from Late Latin calicare "to stop up chinks with lime," from Latin calx (2) "lime, limestone" (see chalk). Original sense is nautical, of making ships watertight by driving oakum into the seams. Related: Caulked; caulking. As a noun, "caulking material," by 1980 (caulking in this sense was used from 1743). Related: Caulker.
causal (adj.) Look up causal at Dictionary.com
1530s, from Latin causalis "relating to a cause," from causa (see cause (n.)).
causality (n.) Look up causality at Dictionary.com
c. 1600, from causal + -ity.
causation (n.) Look up causation at Dictionary.com
1640s, from Latin causationem (nominative causatio) "excuse, pretext," in Medieval Latin "action of causing," from causa (see cause (n.)).
causative (adj.) Look up causative at Dictionary.com
early 15c. (as a noun), from French causatif, from Latin causativus, from causa (see cause (n.)).
cause (n.) Look up cause at Dictionary.com
c. 1200, "reason for action, grounds for action; motive," from Old French cause "cause, reason; lawsuit, case in law" (12c.), and directly from Latin causa "a cause; a reason; interest; judicial process, lawsuit," which is of unknown origin. In English, sense of "matter of concern; side taken in controversy" is from c. 1300; that of "the source of an effect" is early 14c.; meaning "reason for something taking place" is late 14c. Cause célèbre "celebrated legal case" is 1763, from French. Cause why? "for what reason?" is in Chaucer.
cause (v.) Look up cause at Dictionary.com
late 14c., "produce an effect," also "impel, compel," from Old French causer "to cause" (13c.) and directly from Medieval Latin causare, from Latin causa "a cause; a reason; interest; judicial process, lawsuit," which is of unknown origin. Related: Caused; causing. Classical Latin causari meant "to plead, to debate a question."
causeway (n.) Look up causeway at Dictionary.com
1570s, from Middle English cauceweye "raised road" (mid-15c.), first element from Anglo-French cauce, Old North French cauciee (12c., Modern French chaussée), from Vulgar Latin *via calciata "paved way," from Latin calcis, genitive of calx (2) "limestone," or Late Latin calciare "to stamp with the heels, tread" (on notion of a road or mound across marshy ground made firm by treading down), from Latin calx (1) "heel." For second element, see way (n.).
caustic (adj.) Look up caustic at Dictionary.com
c. 1400, "burning, corrosive," from Latin causticus "burning, caustic," from Greek kaustikos "capable of burning; corrosive," from kaustos "combustible; burnt," verbal adjective from kaiein, the Greek word for "to burn" (transitive and intransitive) in all periods, which is of uncertain origin with no certain cognates outside Greek. Figurative sense of "sarcastic" is attested from 1771. As a noun, early 15c., from the adjective.
cauterization (n.) Look up cauterization at Dictionary.com
c. 1400, from Old French cauterisation (14c.) and directly from Late Latin cauterizationem (nominative cauterizatio), noun of action from past participle stem of cauterizare (see cauterize).
cauterize (v.) Look up cauterize at Dictionary.com
c. 1400, from Old French cauterisier, from Late Latin cauterizare "to burn or brand with a hot iron," from Greek kauteriazein, from kauter "burning or branding iron," from kaiein "to burn" (see caustic). Related: Cauterized; cauterizing.
cautery (n.) Look up cautery at Dictionary.com
1540s, from Latin cauterium "branding iron," from Greek kauterion (see cauterize).
caution (n.) Look up caution at Dictionary.com
c. 1300, "bail, guarantee, pledge," from Old French caution "security, surety" (13c.), from Latin cautionem (nominative cautio) "caution, care, foresight, precaution," noun of action from past participle stem of cavere "to be on one's guard" (see caveat). The Latin sense re-emerged in English 16c.-17c. Meaning "word of warning" is from c. 1600.
caution (v.) Look up caution at Dictionary.com
"to warn," 1640s, from caution (n.). Related: Cautioned; cautioning.
cautionary (adj.) Look up cautionary at Dictionary.com
"conveying a warning," 1590s, from caution (n.) + -ary.
cautious (adj.) Look up cautious at Dictionary.com
1640s, from caution + -ous. The Latin word for this was cautus "careful, heedful." Related: Cautiously; cautiousness.
cavalcade (n.) Look up cavalcade at Dictionary.com
1590s, via Middle French cavalcade (15c.), from Italian cavalcata, from cavalcare "to ride on horseback," from Vulgar Latin *caballicare (also source of Spanish cabalgada, Portuguese cavalgata), from Latin caballus (see cavalier). Literally, "a procession on horseback;" in 20c. -cade came to be regarded as a suffix and taken to form motorcade (1913), etc.
cavalier (n.) Look up cavalier at Dictionary.com
1580s, from Italian cavalliere "mounted soldier, knight; gentleman serving as a lady's escort," from Late Latin caballarius "horseman," from Vulgar Latin caballus, the common Vulgar Latin word for "horse" (and source of Italian cavallo, French cheval, Spanish caballo, Irish capall, Welsh ceffyl), displacing Latin equus (see equine).

Sense advanced in 17c. to "knight," then "courtly gentleman" (but also, pejoratively, "swaggerer"), which led to the adjectival senses, especially "disdainful" (1650s). Meaning "Royalist adherent of Charles I" is from 1641. Meaning "one who devotes himself solely to attendance on a lady" is from 1817, roughly translating Italian cavaliere-servente. In classical Latin caballus was "work horse, pack horse," sometimes, disdainfully, "hack, nag." "Not a native Lat. word (as the second -a- would show), though the source of the borrowing is uncertain" [Tucker]. Perhaps from some Balkan or Anatolian language, and meaning, originally, "gelding." The same source is thought to have yielded Old Church Slavonic kobyla.
cavalier (adj.) Look up cavalier at Dictionary.com
"disdainful," 1650s, from cavalier (n.). Earlier it meant "gallant" (1640s). Related: Cavalierly.
cavalry (n.) Look up cavalry at Dictionary.com
1540s, from Middle French cavalerie (16c.), from Italian cavalleria "mounted militia," from cavaliere (see cavalier (n.)). An Old English word for it was horshere.
cave (n.) Look up cave at Dictionary.com
early 13c., from Old French cave "a cave, vault, cellar" (12c.), from Latin cavea "hollow" (place), noun use of neuter plural of adjective cavus "hollow," from PIE root *keue- "a swelling, arch, cavity" (see cumulus). Replaced Old English eorðscrafu. First record of cave man is 1865.
cave (v.) Look up cave at Dictionary.com
early 15c., caven, "to hollow something out," from cave (n.). Modern sense "to collapse in or down" is 1707, American English, presumably from East Anglian dialectal calve "collapse, fall in," perhaps from Flemish; subsequently influenced by cave (n.). Transitive sense by 1762. Related: Caved; caving. Figurative sense of "yield to pressure" is from 1837.
caveat (n.) Look up caveat at Dictionary.com
1540s, from Latin, literally "let him beware," 3rd person singular present subjunctive of cavere "to beware, take heed, watch, guard against," from PIE root *skeue- "to pay attention, perceive" (source also of Sanskrit kavih "wise, sage, seer, poet;" Lithuanian kavoti "tend, safeguard;" Armenian cucanem "I show;" Latin cautio "wariness;" Greek koein "to mark, perceive, hear," kydos "glory, fame," literally "that which is heard of;" Old Church Slavonic chujo "to feel, perceive, hear," cudo "wonder," literally "that which is heard of;" Czech (z)koumati "to perceive, be aware of;" Serbian chuvati "watch, heed;" Old English sceawian "to look at" (source of show (v.)); Middle Dutch schoon "beautiful, bright," properly "showy;" Gothic hausjan "hear").
caveat emptor Look up caveat emptor at Dictionary.com
Latin, literally "let the buyer beware;" see caveat and second element of exempt (adj.).
cavern (n.) Look up cavern at Dictionary.com
late 14c., from Old French caverne (12c.) "cave, vault, cellar," from Late Latin caverna "cave," from Latin cavus "hollow" (see cave (n.)). In Old English such a land feature might be called an eorðscræf.
cavernous (adj.) Look up cavernous at Dictionary.com
c. 1400, "full of caverns," from Latin cavernosus "full of cavities" (source also of Italian cavernoso, French caverneux), from caverna (see cavern). Meaning "hollow" is recorded from 1830.
caviar (n.) Look up caviar at Dictionary.com
also caviare, 1550s, from French caviar (16c.), from Italian caviaro (modern caviale) or Turkish khaviar, from Persian khaviyar, from khaya "egg" (from Middle Persian khayak "egg," from Old Iranian *qvyaka-, diminutive of *avya-, from PIE *owyo-/*oyyo- "egg" see egg (n.)) + dar "bearing."
cavil (v.) Look up cavil at Dictionary.com
1540s, from Middle French caviller "to mock, jest," from Latin cavillari "to jeer, mock; satirize, argue scoffingly" (also source of Italian cavillare, Spanish cavilar), from cavilla "jest, jeering," related to calumnia (see calumny).
cavitate (v.) Look up cavitate at Dictionary.com
1892 (implied in cavitated), back-formation from cavitation. Related: Cavitating.
cavitation (n.) Look up cavitation at Dictionary.com
"formation of bubbles in fluid," 1895, from cavity + -ation. Earlier as a medical term (1868).
cavity (n.) Look up cavity at Dictionary.com
1540s, from Middle French cavité (13c.), from Late Latin cavitatem (nominative cavitas) "hollowness," from Latin cavus "hollow" (see cave (n.)).
cavort (v.) Look up cavort at Dictionary.com
1793, cauvaut, American English, of uncertain origin, sometimes said to be an alteration of curvet "a leap by a horse," from French and related to curve (v.). Or perhaps from ca- colloquial intensive prefix + vault "to jump, leap." Modern form attested by 1829. Related: Cavorted; cavorting.
caw (v.) Look up caw at Dictionary.com
"make a sound like a crow, raven, etc.," 1580s, imitative. Related: Cawed; cawing.
caw (n.) Look up caw at Dictionary.com
1660s, from caw (v.).
cay (n.) Look up cay at Dictionary.com
"low island," 1707, from Spanish cayo; see key (n.2).
cayenne (n.) Look up cayenne at Dictionary.com
"pungent dried pepper," 1756, from Tupi (Brazil) kyynha "capsicum," mistakenly associated with town of Cayenne in French Guyana. The town name is the French form of Guyana.
cayuse (n.) Look up cayuse at Dictionary.com
"horse, Indian pony," 1841, American English, said to be a Chinook (native Pacific Northwest) word; also the name of an Indian group and language (1825), of unknown origin.
CB Look up CB at Dictionary.com
1959, abbreviation of citizens' band (radio).
cc Look up cc at Dictionary.com
1936 as abbreviation of carbon copy in business correspondence.
CD Look up CD at Dictionary.com
1979 as an abbreviation of compact disc as a system of information storage.