Chad (n.2) Look up Chad at Dictionary.com
African nation, former French colony (Tchad), independent since 1960, named for Lake Chad, which is from a local word meaning "lake, large expanse of water." An ironic name for such a desert country.
chad (n.3) Look up chad at Dictionary.com
"hanging flap or piece after a hole is punched in paper," a word unknown to most people until the 2000 U.S. presidential election (when the outcome hinged on partially punched paper ballots in some Florida counties), attested by 1930, of unknown origin.
chador (n.) Look up chador at Dictionary.com
"cloth worn as a shawl by Muslim women," from Persian chadar "tent, mantle, scarf, veil, sheet, table-cloth."
chaeto- Look up chaeto- at Dictionary.com
before vowels chaet-, word-forming element meaning "hair," also, in scientific use, "spine, bristle," from Latinized form of Greek khaite "long, flowing hair" (of persons, also of horses, lions), related to Avestan gaesa- "curly hair."
chaetophobia (n.) Look up chaetophobia at Dictionary.com
"fear of hair," from chaeto- "hair; bristle" + -phobia "fear."
chafe (v.) Look up chafe at Dictionary.com
early 14c., chaufen, c.1300, "be provoked;" late 14c. in literal sense "to make warm, to heat," also intransitive, "to grow warm or hot," especially (early 15c.) "to warm by rubbing," from Old French chaufer "heat, warm up, become warm" (12c., Modern French chauffer), from Vulgar Latin *calefare, from Latin calefacere "to make hot, make warm," from calere "be warm" (see calorie) + facere "to make, do" (see factitious).

Figurative sense from late 14c. include now-obsolete "kindle (joy), inspire, make passionate" as well as "provoke, vex, anger." Sense of "make sore by rubbing" first recorded 1520s. Related: Chafed; chafing.
chafer (n.) Look up chafer at Dictionary.com
kind of beetle, Old English ceafor "beetle, cock-chafer," from Proto-Germanic *kabraz- (cognates: Old Saxon kevera, Dutch kever, Old High German chevar, German Käfer), literally "gnawer," from PIE *gep(h)- "jaw, mouth" (see jowl (n.1)).
chaff (n.) Look up chaff at Dictionary.com
"husks," Old English ceaf "chaff," probably from Proto-Germanic *kaf- "to gnaw, chew" (cognates: Middle Dutch and Dutch kaf, German Kaff), from PIE root *gep(h)- "jaw, mouth" (see jowl (n.1)). Used figuratively for "worthless material" from late 14c.
chaffer (n.) Look up chaffer at Dictionary.com
"a bargain," early 13c., cheffare "buying and selling," also (14c.) cheapfare, probably from Old English ceap "bargain, traffic, gain, sale" (see cheap) + faru "faring, going" (see fare (n.)). In later use, "haggling." The verb is recorded from mid-14c.
chaffinch (n.) Look up chaffinch at Dictionary.com
Fringilla cælebs, Old English ceaffinc, literally "chaff-finch," so called for its habit of eating waste grain among the chaff on farms. See chaff + finch.
chagrin (n.) Look up chagrin at Dictionary.com
1650s, "melancholy," from French chagrin "melancholy, anxiety, vexation" (14c.), from Old North French chagreiner or Angevin dialect chagraigner "sadden," of unknown origin, perhaps [Gamillscheg] from Old French graignier "grieve over, be angry," from graigne "sadness, resentment, grief, vexation," from graim "sorrowful," of unknown origin, perhaps from a Germanic source (compare Old High German gram "angry, fierce"). But OED and other sources trace it to an identical Old French word, borrowed into English phonetically as shagreen, meaning "rough skin or hide," of uncertain origin, the connecting notion being "roughness, harshness." Modern sense of "feeling of irritation from disappointment" is 1716.
chagrin (v.) Look up chagrin at Dictionary.com
1660s (implied in chagrined), from chagrin (n.). Related: Chagrined; chagrining.
chai (n.) Look up chai at Dictionary.com
"tea," 1919, from the Russian or Arabic word for "tea" (see tea, and compare cha). Now used especially of spiced teas.
chain (n.) Look up chain at Dictionary.com
c.1300, from Old French chaeine "chain" (12c., Modern French chaîne), from Latin catena "chain" (source also of Spanish cadena, Italian catena), of unknown origin, perhaps from PIE root *kat- "to twist, twine" (cognates: Latin cassis "hunting net, snare").

Figurative use from c.1600. As a type of ornament worn about the neck, from late 14c. Chain of stores is American English, 1846. Chain gang is from 1834; chain reaction is from 1916 in physics, specific nuclear physics sense is from 1938; chain mail first recorded 1822, in Scott, from mail (n.2). Before that, mail alone sufficed. Chain letter recorded from 1892; usually to raise money at first; decried from the start as a nuisance.
Nine out of every ten givers are reluctant and unwilling, and are coerced into giving through the awful fear of "breaking the chain," so that the spirit of charity is woefully absent. ["St. Nicholas" magazine, vol. XXVI, April 1899]
Chain smoker is attested from 1886, originally of Bismarck (who smoked cigars), thus probably a loan-translation of German Kettenraucher. Chain-smoking is from 1930.
chain (v.) Look up chain at Dictionary.com
late 14c., "to bar with a chain; to put (someone) in chains," also "to link things together," from chain (n.). Related: Chained; chaining.
chainsaw (n.) Look up chainsaw at Dictionary.com
also chain saw, chain-saw; 1818 as a surgical apparatus; 1835 in the saw mill sense, from chain (n.) + saw (n.).
chair (n.) Look up chair at Dictionary.com
early 13c., chaere, from Old French chaiere "chair, seat, throne" (12c.; Modern French chaire "pulpit, throne;" the more modest sense having gone since 16c. with variant form chaise), from Latin cathedra "seat" (see cathedral).

Figurative sense of "authority" was in Middle English, of bishops and professors. Meaning "office of a professor" (1816) is extended from the seat from which a professor lectures (mid-15c.). Meaning "seat of a person presiding at meeting" is from 1640s. As short for electric chair from 1900.
chair (v.) Look up chair at Dictionary.com
mid-15c., "install in a chair or seat" (implied in chairing), from chair (n.); meaning "preside over" (a meeting, etc.) is attested by 1921. Related: Chaired.
chairman (n.) Look up chairman at Dictionary.com
1650s, "occupier of a chair of authority," from chair (n.) + man (n.). Meaning "member of a corporate body chosen to preside at meetings" is from c.1730. Chairwoman in this sense first attested 1752; chairperson 1971.
chairperson (n.) Look up chairperson at Dictionary.com
1971, American English, from chair (n.) + person.
chairwoman (n.) Look up chairwoman at Dictionary.com
"woman who leads a formal meeting," 1752, from chair (n.) + woman.
chaise (n.) Look up chaise at Dictionary.com
1701, "pleasure carriage," from French chaise "chair" (15c.), dialectal variant of chaire (see chair (n.)) due to 15c.-16c. Parisian accent swapping of -r- and -s-, a habit often satirized by French writers. French chair and chaise then took respectively the senses of "high seat, throne, pulpit" and "chair, seat." Chaise lounge (1800) is corruption of French chaise longue "long chair," the second word confused in English with lounge.
chakra (n.) Look up chakra at Dictionary.com
1888 in yoga sense, from Sanskrit cakra "circle, wheel," from PIE root *kwel- (1) "wheel" (see cycle (n.)).
chalazion (n.) Look up chalazion at Dictionary.com
small tumor in the eyelid, 1708, from Greek khalazion, diminutive of khalaza "hail, hailstone; small lump or knot; pimple," from PIE root *gheled- "hail."
chalcedony (n.) Look up chalcedony at Dictionary.com
c.1300, from Latin calcedonius, in Vulgate translating Greek khalkedon in Rev. xxi:19, found nowhere else. Connection with Chalcedon in Asia Minor "is very doubtful" [OED]. The city name is from Phoenician and means "new town."
Chaldean (adj.) Look up Chaldean at Dictionary.com
with + -an + Latin Chaldaeus, from Greek Khaldaios, from Aramaic Kaldaie, from Akkadian (mat)Kaldu "the Chaldeans."
chalet (n.) Look up chalet at Dictionary.com
1782, from Swiss-French chalet "herdsman's hut, Alpine cottage," probably a diminutive of Old French chasel "farmhouse, house, abode, hut," perhaps from Vulgar Latin *casalis "belonging to a house," from Latin casa "house;" or from Old Provençal cala "small shelter for ships," from a pre-Latin language [Barnhart].
chalice (n.) Look up chalice at Dictionary.com
early 14c., from Anglo-French chalice, from Old French chalice, collateral form of calice (Modern French calice), from Latin calicem (nominative calix) "cup," cognate with Greek kylix "cup, drinking cup, cup of a flower," from PIE root *kal- (1) "cup." Ousted Old English cognate cælic, an ecclesiastical borrowing of the Latin word, and earlier Middle English caliz, from Old North French.
chalk (n.) Look up chalk at Dictionary.com
Old English cealc "chalk, lime, plaster; pebble," a West Germanic borrowing from Latin calx (2) "limestone, lime (crushed limestone), small stone," from Greek khalix "small pebble," which many trace to a PIE root for "split, break up." In most Germanic languages still with the "limestone" sense, but in English transferred to the opaque, white, soft limestone found abundantly in the south of the island. Modern spelling is from early 14c. The Latin word for "chalk" was creta, which also is of unknown origin.
chalk (v.) Look up chalk at Dictionary.com
1570s, "to mix with chalk;" 1590s as "to mark with chalk," from chalk (n.). Related: Chalked; chalking. Old English had cealcian "to whiten." Certain chalk marks on shipped objects meant "admitted" or "shipped free," hence some figurative senses. Chalk boards also were commonly used in keeping credit, score, etc., hence figurative use of chalk it up (1903).
chalk-mark (n.) Look up chalk-mark at Dictionary.com
1767, from chalk (n.) + mark (n.). As a verb from 1866.
chalkboard (n.) Look up chalkboard at Dictionary.com
also chalk-board, 1816, from chalk (n.) + board (n.1).
chalky (adj.) Look up chalky at Dictionary.com
c.1400, from chalk (n.) + -y (2). Related: Chalkiness.
challah (n.) Look up challah at Dictionary.com
from Yiddish khale, from Hebrew chala "loaf of bread."
challenge (n.) Look up challenge at Dictionary.com
early 14c., "something one can be accused of, a fault, blemish;" mid-14c., "false accusation, malicious charge; accusation of wrong-doing," also "act of laying claim" (to something), from Anglo-French chalenge, Old French chalonge "calumny, slander; demand, opposition," in legal use, "accusation, claim, dispute," from Anglo-French chalengier, Old French chalongier "to accuse, to dispute" (see challenge (v.)). Accusatory connotations died out 17c. Meanings "an objection" in law, etc.; "a calling to fight" are from mid-15c. Meaning "difficult task" is from 1954.
challenge (v.) Look up challenge at Dictionary.com
c.1200, "to rebuke," from Old French chalongier "complain, protest; haggle, quibble," from Vulgar Latin calumniare "to accuse falsely," from Latin calumniari "to accuse falsely, misrepresent, slander," from calumnia "trickery" (see calumny).

From late 13c. as "to object to, take exception to;" c.1300 as "to accuse," especially "to accuse falsely," also "to call to account;" late 14c. as "to call to fight." Also used in Middle English with sense "claim, take to oneself." Related: Challenged; challenging.
challenged (adj.) Look up challenged at Dictionary.com
as a euphemism for "disabled," 1985, past participle adjective from challenge (v.).
challenger (n.) Look up challenger at Dictionary.com
late 13c., "a claimant;" mid-14c., "one who makes false charges;" mid-15c., "one who disputes something, objector," from Anglo-French chalengeour (Old French chalongeor "slanderer, petitioner, plaintiff"), agent noun from challenge (v.). Specific sense of "one who calls out another in a contest" is from 1510s.
challis (n.) Look up challis at Dictionary.com
type of fabric for ladies' dresses, 1849, of unknown origin, perhaps from the surname.
cham (n.) Look up cham at Dictionary.com
old alternative form of khan, 1550s, from French cham, Medieval Latin cham, alternative forms of chan, can.
chamber (n.) Look up chamber at Dictionary.com
c.1200, "room," usually a private one, from Old French chambre "room, chamber, apartment," also used in combinations to form words for "latrine, privy" (11c.), from Late Latin camera "a chamber, room" (see camera). In anatomy from late 14c.; of machinery from 1769. Gunnery sense is from 1620s. Meaning "legislative body" is from c.1400. Chamber music (1789) was that meant to be performed in private rooms instead of public halls.
chamber (v.) Look up chamber at Dictionary.com
late 14c., "to restrain," also "to furnish with a chamber" (inplied in chambered, from chamber (n.). Related: Chambering.
chamber-lye (n.) Look up chamber-lye at Dictionary.com
"urine used as a detergent," 1570s, from chamber (n.) in the "privy" sense + lye.
chamber-pot (n.) Look up chamber-pot at Dictionary.com
also chamberpot, 1560s, from chamber (n.) + pot (n.1).
chambered (adj.) Look up chambered at Dictionary.com
late 14c., past participle adjective from chamber (v.).
chamberlain (n.) Look up chamberlain at Dictionary.com
early 13c., from Old French chamberlenc "chamberlain, steward, treasurer" (Modern French chambellan), from a Germanic source (perhaps Frankish *kamerling; compare Old High German chamarling, German Kämmerling), from Latin camera "chamber, room" (see camera) + Germanic diminutive suffix -ling.
chambermaid (n.) Look up chambermaid at Dictionary.com
1580s, from chamber + maid.
chambray (n.) Look up chambray at Dictionary.com
1814, American English, alteration of Cambrai, city in France (formerly Flanders) where the cloth originally was made. Compare cambric.
chameleon (n.) Look up chameleon at Dictionary.com
mid-14c., camelion, from Old French caméléon, from Latin chamaeleon, from Greek khamaileon "the chameleon," from khamai "on the ground" (also "dwarf"), akin to chthon "earth" (see chthonic) + leon "lion" (see lion). Perhaps the large head-crest on some species was thought to resemble a lion's mane. The classical -h- was restored in English early 18c. Figurative sense of "variable person" is 1580s. It formerly was supposed to live on air (as in "Hamlet" III.ii.98).
chamfer (n.) Look up chamfer at Dictionary.com
c.1600, "small groove cut in wood or stone," from Middle French chanfraindre (15c., Modern French chanfreiner), past participle of chanfraint. The second element seems to be from Latin frangere "to break" (see fraction); perhaps the whole word is cantum frangere "to break the edge." Meaning "bevelled surface of a square edge or corner" is attested from c.1840, of uncertain connection to the other sense.