cesarian Look up cesarian at Dictionary.com
alternative spelling of caesarian.
cesium (n.) Look up cesium at Dictionary.com
also caesium, rare alkaline metal, 1861, coined by Bunsen and Kirchhoff in 1860 in Modern Latin (caesium), from Latin caesius "blue-gray" (especially of eyes), in reference to the two prominent blue lines in its spectrum, by which it was first identified. With metallic element ending -ium.
cess (n.) Look up cess at Dictionary.com
"tax, levy," 1530s, short for assess (q.v.).
cessation (n.) Look up cessation at Dictionary.com
mid-15c., cessacyoun "interruption, abdication," from Latin cessationem (nominative cessatio) "a delaying, ceasing, tarrying," noun of action from past participle stem of cessare "delay" (see cease (n.)).
cession (n.) Look up cession at Dictionary.com
late 14c., "a relinquishing," from Old French cession "cession; death" (13c.), from Latin cessionem (nominative cessio) "a giving up, surrendering," noun of action from past participle stem of cedere "to go away, yield" (from PIE root *ked- "to go, yield"). Related: Cessionary.
cesspit (n.) Look up cesspit at Dictionary.com
1864, from cess (see cesspool) + pit (n.).
cesspool (n.) Look up cesspool at Dictionary.com
also cess-pool, 1670s, the first element perhaps an alteration of cistern, perhaps a shortened form of recess [Klein]; or the whole may be an alteration of suspiral (c. 1400), "drainpipe," from Old French sospiral "a vent, air hole," from sospirer "breathe," from Latin suspirare "breathe deep" [Barnhart]. Meaning extended to "tank at the end of the pipe," which would account for a possible folk-etymology change in final syllable.

Other possible etymologies: Italian cesso "privy," from Latin secessus "place of retirement" (in Late Latin "privy, drain"); dialectal suspool, from suss, soss "puddle;" or cess "a bog on the banks of a tidal river."
Cestrian Look up Cestrian at Dictionary.com
1703, from Cester, Old English form of Chester, + -ian.
Cetacea (n.) Look up Cetacea at Dictionary.com
order of marine mammals containing whales, 1830, Modern Latin, from Latin cetus "any large sea creature" (whales, seals, dolphins), from Greek ketos "a whale, a sea monster," which is of unknown origin, + -acea. Hence cetology "the study of whales," first attested 1851 in "Moby Dick."
cetacean (n.) Look up cetacean at Dictionary.com
1836, from Cetacea, name of the order of marine mammals, + -an. As an adjective from 1839.
ceteris paribus Look up ceteris paribus at Dictionary.com
Modern Latin, "other things being equal."
cetyl (n.) Look up cetyl at Dictionary.com
univalent alcohol radical found in spermaceti, beeswax, etc., 1842, from Latin cetus "whale" (see Cetacea) + -yl.
Ceylon Look up Ceylon at Dictionary.com
Portuguese form of Sri Lanka (q.v.). Related: Ceylonese.
cf Look up cf at Dictionary.com
see cf.
cf. Look up cf. at Dictionary.com
abbreviation of Latin confer "compare" (see confer).
cgi Look up cgi at Dictionary.com
by 2004, initialism (acronym) for computer-generated imagery.
ch Look up ch at Dictionary.com
digraph used in Old French for the "tsh" sound. In some French dialects, including that of Paris (but not that of Picardy), Latin ca- became French "tsha." This was introduced to English after the Norman Conquest, in words borrowed from Old French such as chaste, charity, chief (adj.). Under French influence, -ch- also was inserted into Anglo-Saxon words that had the same sound (such as bleach, chest, church) which in Old English still was written with a simple -c-, and into those that had formerly been spelled with a -c- and pronounced "k" such as chin and much.

As French evolved, the "t" sound dropped out of it, so in later loan-words from France ch- has only the sound "sh-" (chauffeur, machine (n.), chivalry, etc.).

It turns up as well in words from classical languages (chaos, echo, etc.). Most uses of -ch- in Roman Latin were in words from Greek, which would be pronounced correctly as "k" + "h," as in blockhead, but most Romans would have said merely "k." Sometimes ch- is written to keep -c- hard before a front vowel, as still in modern Italian.

In some languages (Welsh, Spanish, Czech) ch- can be treated as a separate letter and words in it are alphabetized after -c- (or, in Czech and Slovak, after -h-). The sound also is heard in more distant languages (as in cheetah, chintz), and the digraph also is used to represent the sound in Scottish loch.
cha (n.) Look up cha at Dictionary.com
"tea," 1590s, also chaw, ultimately from the Mandarin ch'a "tea;" used in English alongside tea when the beverage was introduced.
cha-cha (n.) Look up cha-cha at Dictionary.com
also cha-cha-cha, type of Latin-American 3-beat ballroom dance, 1954, echoic of the music.
Chablis (n.) Look up Chablis at Dictionary.com
light, white Burgundy wine, 1660s, named for town of Chablis southeast of Paris. Made only of Chardonnay grapes. The French word chablis (16c.) is literally "deadwood," fallen from a tree through age or brought down by wind, short for bois chablis, from Old French *chableiz.
chad (n.1) Look up chad at Dictionary.com
also Mr. Chad, graffiti drawing of a head peering over a fence or wall, with the caption, "Wot, no ______?" (the U.S. version usually had "Kilroy was here"), in reaction to shortages and rationing, 1945, British, of unknown origin.
Chad (n.2) Look up Chad at Dictionary.com
African nation, former French colony (Tchad), independent since 1960, named for Lake Chad, which is from a local word meaning "lake, large expanse of water." An ironic name for such a desert country.
chad (n.3) Look up chad at Dictionary.com
"hanging flap or piece after a hole is punched in paper," a word unknown to most people until the 2000 U.S. presidential election (when the outcome hinged on partially punched paper ballots in some Florida counties), attested by 1930, of unknown origin.
chador (n.) Look up chador at Dictionary.com
"cloth worn as a shawl by Muslim women," from Persian chadar "tent, mantle, scarf, veil, sheet, table-cloth."
chaeto- Look up chaeto- at Dictionary.com
before vowels chaet-, word-forming element meaning "hair," also, in scientific use, "spine, bristle," from Latinized form of Greek khaite "long, flowing hair" (of persons, also of horses, lions), related to Avestan gaesa- "curly hair."
chaetophobia (n.) Look up chaetophobia at Dictionary.com
"fear of hair," from chaeto- "hair; bristle" + -phobia "fear."
chafe (v.) Look up chafe at Dictionary.com
early 14c., chaufen, c. 1300, "be provoked;" late 14c. in literal sense "to make warm, to heat," also intransitive, "to grow warm or hot," especially (early 15c.) "to warm by rubbing," from Old French chaufer "heat, warm up, become warm" (12c., Modern French chauffer), from Vulgar Latin *calefare, from Latin calefacere "to make hot, make warm," from calere "be warm" (from PIE root *kele- (1) "warm") + facere "to make, do" (from PIE root *dhe- "to set, put").

Figurative sense from late 14c. include now-obsolete "kindle (joy), inspire, make passionate" as well as "provoke, vex, anger." Sense of "make sore by rubbing" first recorded 1520s. Related: Chafed; chafing.
chafer (n.) Look up chafer at Dictionary.com
kind of beetle, Old English ceafor "beetle, cock-chafer," from Proto-Germanic *kabraz- (source also of Old Saxon kevera, Dutch kever, Old High German chevar, German Käfer), literally "gnawer," from PIE *gep(h)- "jaw, mouth" (see jowl (n.1)).
chaff (n.) Look up chaff at Dictionary.com
"husks," Old English ceaf "chaff," probably from Proto-Germanic *kaf- "to gnaw, chew" (source also of Middle Dutch and Dutch kaf, German Kaff), from PIE root *gep(h)- "jaw, mouth" (see jowl (n.1)). Used figuratively for "worthless material" from late 14c.
chaffer (n.) Look up chaffer at Dictionary.com
"a bargain," early 13c., cheffare "buying and selling," also (14c.) cheapfare, probably from Old English ceap "bargain, traffic, gain, sale" (see cheap) + faru "faring, going" (see fare (n.)). In later use, "haggling." The verb is recorded from mid-14c.
chaffinch (n.) Look up chaffinch at Dictionary.com
Fringilla cælebs, Old English ceaffinc, literally "chaff-finch," so called for its habit of eating waste grain among the chaff on farms. See chaff + finch.
chagrin (n.) Look up chagrin at Dictionary.com
1650s, "melancholy," from French chagrin "melancholy, anxiety, vexation" (14c.), from Old North French chagreiner or Angevin dialect chagraigner "sadden," which is of unknown origin, perhaps [Gamillscheg] from Old French graignier "grieve over, be angry," from graigne "sadness, resentment, grief, vexation," from graim "sorrowful," which is of unknown origin, perhaps from a Germanic source (compare Old High German gram "angry, fierce"). But OED and other sources trace it to an identical Old French word, borrowed into English phonetically as shagreen, meaning "rough skin or hide," which is of uncertain origin, the connecting notion being "roughness, harshness." Modern sense of "feeling of irritation from disappointment" is 1716.
chagrin (v.) Look up chagrin at Dictionary.com
1660s (implied in chagrined), from chagrin (n.). Related: Chagrined; chagrining.
chai (n.) Look up chai at Dictionary.com
"tea," 1919, from the Russian or Arabic word for "tea" (see tea, and compare cha). Now used especially of spiced teas.
chain (n.) Look up chain at Dictionary.com
c. 1300, from Old French chaeine "chain" (12c., Modern French chaîne), from Latin catena "chain" (source also of Spanish cadena, Italian catena), which is of unknown origin, perhaps from PIE root *kat- "to twist, twine" (source also of Latin cassis "hunting net, snare").

Figurative use from c. 1600. As a type of ornament worn about the neck, from late 14c. Chain of stores is American English, 1846. Chain gang is from 1834; chain reaction is from 1916 in physics, specific nuclear physics sense is from 1938; chain mail first recorded 1822, in Scott, from mail (n.2). Before that, mail alone sufficed. Chain letter recorded from 1892; usually to raise money at first; decried from the start as a nuisance.
Nine out of every ten givers are reluctant and unwilling, and are coerced into giving through the awful fear of "breaking the chain," so that the spirit of charity is woefully absent. ["St. Nicholas" magazine, vol. xxvi, April 1899]
Chain smoker is attested from 1886, originally of Bismarck (who smoked cigars), thus probably a loan-translation of German Kettenraucher. Chain-smoking is from 1930.
chain (v.) Look up chain at Dictionary.com
late 14c., "to bar with a chain; to put (someone) in chains," also "to link things together," from chain (n.). Related: Chained; chaining.
chainsaw (n.) Look up chainsaw at Dictionary.com
also chain saw, chain-saw; 1818 as a surgical apparatus; 1835 in the saw mill sense, from chain (n.) + saw (n.).
chair (n.) Look up chair at Dictionary.com
early 13c., chaere, from Old French chaiere "chair, seat, throne" (12c.; Modern French chaire "pulpit, throne;" the more modest sense having gone since 16c. with variant form chaise), from Latin cathedra "seat" (see cathedral).

Figurative sense of "authority" was in Middle English, of bishops and professors. Meaning "office of a professor" (1816) is extended from the seat from which a professor lectures (mid-15c.). Meaning "seat of a person presiding at meeting" is from 1640s. As short for electric chair from 1900.
chair (v.) Look up chair at Dictionary.com
mid-15c., "install in a chair or seat" (implied in chairing), from chair (n.); meaning "preside over" (a meeting, etc.) is attested by 1921. Related: Chaired.
chairman (n.) Look up chairman at Dictionary.com
1650s, "occupier of a chair of authority," from chair (n.) + man (n.). Meaning "member of a corporate body chosen to preside at meetings" is from c. 1730. Chairwoman in this sense first attested 1752; chairperson 1971.
chairperson (n.) Look up chairperson at Dictionary.com
1971, American English, from chair (n.) + person.
chairwoman (n.) Look up chairwoman at Dictionary.com
"woman who leads a formal meeting," 1752, from chair (n.) + woman.
chaise (n.) Look up chaise at Dictionary.com
1701, "pleasure carriage," from French chaise "chair" (15c.), dialectal variant of chaire (see chair (n.)) due to 15c.-16c. Parisian accent swapping of -r- and -s-, a habit often satirized by French writers. French chair and chaise then took respectively the senses of "high seat, throne, pulpit" and "chair, seat." Chaise lounge (1800) is corruption of French chaise longue "long chair," the second word confused in English with lounge.
chakra (n.) Look up chakra at Dictionary.com
1888 in yoga sense, from Sanskrit cakra "circle, wheel," from PIE root *kwel- (1) "revolve, move round."
chalazion (n.) Look up chalazion at Dictionary.com
small tumor in the eyelid, 1708, from Greek khalazion, diminutive of khalaza "hail, hailstone; small lump or knot; pimple," from PIE root *gheled- "hail" (source also of Persian žala "hail," Polish złod "glaze," Russian oželedica "glazed frost, fringe of ice on snow").
chalcedony (n.) Look up chalcedony at Dictionary.com
c. 1300, from Latin calcedonius, in Vulgate translating Greek khalkedon in Revelations xxi.19, found nowhere else. Connection with Chalcedon in Asia Minor "is very doubtful" [OED]. The city name is from Phoenician and means "new town."
Chaldean (adj.) Look up Chaldean at Dictionary.com
with + -an + Latin Chaldaeus, from Greek Khaldaios, from Aramaic (Semitic) Kaldaie, from Akkadian (mat)Kaldu "the Chaldeans."
chalet (n.) Look up chalet at Dictionary.com
1782, from Swiss-French chalet "herdsman's hut, Alpine cottage," probably a diminutive of Old French chasel "farmhouse, house, abode, hut," perhaps from Vulgar Latin *casalis "belonging to a house," from Latin casa "house;" or from Old Provençal cala "small shelter for ships," from a pre-Latin language [Barnhart].
chalice (n.) Look up chalice at Dictionary.com
early 14c., from Anglo-French chalice, from Old French chalice, collateral form of calice (Modern French calice), from Latin calicem (nominative calix) "cup," cognate with Greek kylix "cup, drinking cup, cup of a flower," from PIE root *kal- (1) "cup." Ousted Old English cognate cælic, an ecclesiastical borrowing of the Latin word, and earlier Middle English caliz, from Old North French.
chalk (n.) Look up chalk at Dictionary.com
Old English cealc "chalk, lime, plaster; pebble," a West Germanic borrowing from Latin calx (2) "limestone, lime (crushed limestone), small stone," from Greek khalix "small pebble," which many trace to a PIE root for "split, break up." In most Germanic languages still with the "limestone" sense, but in English transferred to the opaque, white, soft limestone found abundantly in the south of the island. Modern spelling is from early 14c. The Latin word for "chalk" was creta, which also is of unknown origin.