chalk (v.) Look up chalk at Dictionary.com
1570s, "to mix with chalk;" 1590s as "to mark with chalk," from chalk (n.). Related: Chalked; chalking. Old English had cealcian "to whiten." Certain chalk marks on shipped objects meant "admitted" or "shipped free," hence some figurative senses. Chalk boards also were commonly used in keeping credit, score, etc., hence figurative use of chalk it up (1903).
chalk-mark (n.) Look up chalk-mark at Dictionary.com
1767, from chalk (n.) + mark (n.). As a verb from 1866.
chalkboard (n.) Look up chalkboard at Dictionary.com
also chalk-board, 1816, from chalk (n.) + board (n.1).
chalky (adj.) Look up chalky at Dictionary.com
c. 1400, from chalk (n.) + -y (2). Related: Chalkiness.
challah (n.) Look up challah at Dictionary.com
from Yiddish khale, from Hebrew chala "loaf of bread."
challenge (n.) Look up challenge at Dictionary.com
early 14c., "something one can be accused of, a fault, blemish;" mid-14c., "false accusation, malicious charge; accusation of wrong-doing," also "act of laying claim" (to something), from Anglo-French chalenge, Old French chalonge "calumny, slander; demand, opposition," in legal use, "accusation, claim, dispute," from Anglo-French chalengier, Old French chalongier "to accuse, to dispute" (see challenge (v.)). Accusatory connotations died out 17c. Meanings "an objection" in law, etc.; "a calling to fight" are from mid-15c. Meaning "difficult task" is from 1954.
challenge (v.) Look up challenge at Dictionary.com
c. 1200, "to rebuke," from Old French chalongier "complain, protest; haggle, quibble," from Vulgar Latin calumniare "to accuse falsely," from Latin calumniari "to accuse falsely, misrepresent, slander," from calumnia "trickery" (see calumny).

From late 13c. as "to object to, take exception to;" c. 1300 as "to accuse," especially "to accuse falsely," also "to call to account;" late 14c. as "to call to fight." Also used in Middle English with sense "claim, take to oneself." Related: Challenged; challenging.
challenged (adj.) Look up challenged at Dictionary.com
as a euphemism for "disabled," 1985, past participle adjective from challenge (v.).
challenger (n.) Look up challenger at Dictionary.com
late 13c., "a claimant;" mid-14c., "one who makes false charges;" mid-15c., "one who disputes something, objector," from Anglo-French chalengeour (Old French chalongeor "slanderer, petitioner, plaintiff"), agent noun from challenge (v.). Specific sense of "one who calls out another in a contest" is from 1510s.
challis (n.) Look up challis at Dictionary.com
type of fabric for ladies' dresses, 1849, of unknown origin, perhaps from the surname.
cham (n.) Look up cham at Dictionary.com
old alternative form of khan, 1550s, from French cham, Medieval Latin cham, alternative forms of chan, can.
chamber (n.) Look up chamber at Dictionary.com
c. 1200, "room," usually a private one, from Old French chambre "room, chamber, apartment," also used in combinations to form words for "latrine, privy" (11c.), from Late Latin camera "a chamber, room" (see camera). In anatomy from late 14c.; of machinery from 1769. Gunnery sense is from 1620s. Meaning "legislative body" is from c. 1400. Chamber music (1789) was that meant to be performed in private rooms instead of public halls.
chamber (v.) Look up chamber at Dictionary.com
late 14c., "to restrain," also "to furnish with a chamber" (inplied in chambered, from chamber (n.). Related: Chambering.
chamber-lye (n.) Look up chamber-lye at Dictionary.com
"urine used as a detergent," 1570s, from chamber (n.) in the "privy" sense + lye.
chamber-pot (n.) Look up chamber-pot at Dictionary.com
also chamberpot, 1560s, from chamber (n.) + pot (n.1).
chambered (adj.) Look up chambered at Dictionary.com
late 14c., past participle adjective from chamber (v.).
chamberlain (n.) Look up chamberlain at Dictionary.com
early 13c., from Old French chamberlenc "chamberlain, steward, treasurer" (Modern French chambellan), from a Germanic source (perhaps Frankish *kamerling; compare Old High German chamarling, German Kämmerling), from Latin camera "chamber, room" (see camera) + Germanic diminutive suffix -ling.
chambermaid (n.) Look up chambermaid at Dictionary.com
1580s, from chamber + maid.
chambray (n.) Look up chambray at Dictionary.com
1814, American English, alteration of Cambrai, city in France (formerly Flanders) where the cloth originally was made. Compare cambric.
chameleon (n.) Look up chameleon at Dictionary.com
mid-14c., camelion, from Old French caméléon, from Latin chamaeleon, from Greek khamaileon "the chameleon," from khamai "on the ground" (also "dwarf"), akin to chthon "earth" (from PIE root *dhghem- "earth") + leon "lion" (see lion). Perhaps the large head-crest on some species was thought to resemble a lion's mane. Greek khamalos meant "on the ground, creeping," also "low, trifling, diminutive." The classical -h- was restored in English early 18c. Figurative sense of "variable person" is 1580s. It formerly was supposed to live on air (as in "Hamlet" III.ii.98).
chamfer (n.) Look up chamfer at Dictionary.com
c. 1600, "small groove cut in wood or stone," from Middle French chanfraindre (15c., Modern French chanfreiner), past participle of chanfraint. The second element seems to be from Latin frangere "to break" (from PIE root *bhreg- "to break"); perhaps the whole word is cantum frangere "to break the edge." Meaning "bevelled surface of a square edge or corner" is attested from c. 1840, of uncertain connection to the other sense.
chamfered (adj.) Look up chamfered at Dictionary.com
1560s, "channelled, fluted," from the verb form of chamfer (v.); see chamfer (n.)). Meaning "bevelled off" is from c. 1790.
chamois (n.) Look up chamois at Dictionary.com
1550s, "Alpine antelope;" 1570s, "soft leather," originally "skin of the chamois," from Middle French chamois "Alpine antelope" (14c.), from Late Latin camox (genitive camocis), perhaps from a pre-Latin Alpine language that also produced Italian camoscio, Spanish camuza, Old High German gamiza, German Gemse (though some of these might be from Latin camox). As a verb, "to polish with chamois," from 1934.
chamomile (n.) Look up chamomile at Dictionary.com
obsolete form of camomile.
Chamorro Look up Chamorro at Dictionary.com
indigenous people of Guam and the Marianas Islands, from Spanish Chamorro, literally "shorn, shaven, bald." Supposedly because the men shaved their heads, but the name also has been connected to native Chamoru, said to mean "noble," so perhaps Chamorro is a Spanish folk etymology.
champ (n.) Look up champ at Dictionary.com
1868, American English abbreviation of champion (n.).
champ (v.) Look up champ at Dictionary.com
"to chew noisily," 1520s, probably echoic; OED suggests a connection with jam (v.). Earlier also cham, chamb, etc. (late 14c.). To champ on (or at) the bit, as an eager horse will, is attested in figurative sense by 1640s. Related: Champed; champing. As a noun in this sense, attested from c. 1600.
champagne (n.) Look up champagne at Dictionary.com
1660s, from French, short for vin de Champagne "wine made in Champagne," former province in northwest France, literally "open country" (see campaign (n.)). Originally any wine from this region, focused to the modern meaning late 18c.
champaign (n.) Look up champaign at Dictionary.com
"open country, plain," c. 1400, from Old French champagne "country, countryside," from Latin campania "plain, level country," especially that near Rome (see campaign (n.)).
champertous (adj.) Look up champertous at Dictionary.com
1640s, from champart, from French champart "portion of produce received by a feudal lord from land held in lease from him" (13c.), from Old North French campart-, probably from Latin campi pars "part of the field" (see campus + part (n.)). In later use often with reference to champerty (early 14c.), the illegal act whereby a person makes a bargain to maintain a litigant in return for a share of the gains if the case succeeds.
champignon (n.) Look up champignon at Dictionary.com
"mushroom," 1570s, from Middle French champignon (14c.), with change of suffix, from Old French champegnuel, from Vulgar Latin *campaniolus "that which grows in the field," from Late Latin campaneus "pertaining to the fields," from campania "level country" (see campaign (n.)).
champion (n.) Look up champion at Dictionary.com
early 13c., "doughty fighting man, valorous combatant," also (c. 1300) "one who fights on behalf of another or others," from Old French champion "combatant, champion in single combat" (12c.), from Late Latin campionem (nominative campio) "gladiator, fighter, combatant in the field," from Latin campus "field (of combat);" see campus. Had been borrowed earlier by Old English as cempa. Sports sense in reference to "first-place performer in some field" is recorded from 1730.
champion (v.) Look up champion at Dictionary.com
"to fight for, defend, protect," 1820 (Scott) in a literal sense, from champion (n.). Figurative use by 1830. Earlier it meant "to challenge" (c. 1600). Related: Championed; championing.
championship (n.) Look up championship at Dictionary.com
1812, "position of a champion," from champion (n.) + -ship. Meaning "competition to determine a champion" is recorded from 1893.
chance (v.) Look up chance at Dictionary.com
late 14c., "to come about, to happen," from chance (n.). Meaning "to risk" attested from 1859. Related: Chanced; chancing.
chance (n.) Look up chance at Dictionary.com
c. 1300, "something that takes place, what happens, an occurrence" (good or bad, but more often bad), from Old French cheance "accident, chance, fortune, luck, situation, the falling of dice" (12c., Modern French chance), from Vulgar Latin *cadentia "that which falls out," a term used in dice, from neuter plural of Latin cadens, present participle of cadere "to fall," from PIE root *kad- "to fall."

In English frequently in plural, chances. The word's notions of "opportunity" and "randomness" are as old as the record of it in English and now all but crowd out the word's original notion of "mere occurrence." Main chance "thing of most importance" is from 1570s, bearing the older sense. The mathematical (and hence odds-making) sense is attested from 1778. To stand a chance (or not) is from 1796.

To take (one's) chances "accept what happens" (early 14c.) is from the old, neutral sense; to take a chance/take chances is originally (by 1814) "participate in a raffle or lottery or game;" extended sense of "take a risk" is by 1826.
chancel (n.) Look up chancel at Dictionary.com
c. 1300, "part of the church around the altar," from Old French chancel, from Late Latin cancellus "lattice," from Latin cancelli (plural) "grating, bars" (see cancel); sense extended in Late Latin from the lattice-work that separated the choir from the nave in a church to the space itself.
chancellery (n.) Look up chancellery at Dictionary.com
see chancery.
chancellor (n.) Look up chancellor at Dictionary.com
early 12c., from Old French chancelier (12c.), from Late Latin cancellarius "keeper of the barrier, secretary, usher of a law court," so called because he worked behind a lattice (Latin cancellus) at a basilica or law court (see chancel). In the Roman Empire, a sort of court usher; the post gradually gained importance in the Western kingdoms. A variant form, canceler, existed in Old English, from Old North French, but was replaced by this central French form.
chancery (n.) Look up chancery at Dictionary.com
late 14c., "court of the Lord Chancellor of England," contracted from chancellery (c. 1300), from Old French chancelerie (12c.), from Medieval Latin cancellaria (see chancellor).
chancre (n.) Look up chancre at Dictionary.com
also chanker, "venereal ulcer," c. 1600, from French chancre (15c.), literally "cancer," from Latin cancer (see cancer).
chancy (adj.) Look up chancy at Dictionary.com
1510s, "lucky, foreboding good fortune," from chance (n.) + -y (2). Meaning "uncertain, subject to risk" is recorded from 1860. The possible sense "full of opportunity" seems to have been used regularly only in cricket (1875).
chandelier (n.) Look up chandelier at Dictionary.com
late 14c., chaundeler "candlestick, chandelier," from Old French chandelier (n.1), 12c., earlier chandelabre "candlestick, candelabrum" (10c.), from Latin candelabrum, from candela "candle" (see candle). Re-spelled mid-18c. in French fashion; during 17c. the French spelling referred to a military device.
chandler (n.) Look up chandler at Dictionary.com
"maker or seller of candles," late 14c., attested as a surname from late 13c. (also, from early 14c. "candle-holder;" see chandelier), from Old French chandelier (n.2) "candle-maker, candle-seller; person in charge of lighting a household, monastery, etc.," from Latin candelarius, from candela "candle" (see candle). Native candleman is attested from mid-13c.
chandlery (n.) Look up chandlery at Dictionary.com
c. 1600, from Middle French chandelerie, from chandelier (see chandler).
Chanel Look up Chanel at Dictionary.com
Paris fashion house, founded by Gabrielle 'Coco' Chanel (1883-1971), French fashion designer and perfumier, who opened her first shop in 1909. The perfume Chanel No. 5 debuted in 1921.
change (v.) Look up change at Dictionary.com
early 13c., "to substitute one for another; to make (something) other than what it was" (transitive); from late 13c. as "to become different" (intransitive), from Old French changier "to change, alter; exchange, switch," from Late Latin cambiare "to barter, exchange," from Latin cambire "to exchange, barter," of Celtic origin, from PIE root *kemb- "to bend, crook" (with a sense evolution perhaps from "to turn" to "to change," to "to barter"); cognate with Old Irish camm "crooked, curved;" Middle Irish cimb "tribute," cimbid "prisoner;" see cant (n.2). Meaning "to take off clothes and put on other ones" is from late 15c. Related: Changed; changing. To change (one's) mind is from 1610s.
change (n.) Look up change at Dictionary.com
c. 1200, "act or fact of changing," from Anglo-French chaunge, Old French change "exchange, recompense, reciprocation," from changier (see change (v.)).

Meaning "a different situation" is from 1680s. Meaning "something substituted for something else" is from 1590s. The financial sense of "balance returned when something is paid for" is first recorded 1620s; hence to make change (1865). Bell-ringing sense is from 1610s. Related: changes. Figurative phrase change of heart is from 1828.
changeable (adj.) Look up changeable at Dictionary.com
mid-13c., "unstable, inconstant, unreliable," from Old French changeable "inconstant," from changier (see change (v.)) + -able (see -able). Meaning "subject to variation" is from late 14c. Related: Changeably.
changeling (n.) Look up changeling at Dictionary.com
1550s, "one given to change," from change (n.) + diminutive suffix -ling. Meaning "person or thing left in place of one secretly taken" is from 1560s; specific reference to an infant or young child (usually stupid or ugly) supposedly left by the faeries in place of one they took is from 1580s. An earlier word for it was oaf or auf.