chop (n.) Look up chop at Dictionary.com
"act of chopping," mid-14c., from chop (v.1). Meaning "piece cut off" is mid-15c.; specifically "slice of meat" from mid-17c. Sense of "a blow, strike" is from 1550s.
chop suey (n.) Look up chop suey at Dictionary.com
1885, American English, from Chinese (Cantonese dialect) tsap sui "odds and ends, mixed bits."
chop-chop (adv.) Look up chop-chop at Dictionary.com
"quickly," Pidgin English, from Chinese k'wa-k'wa (see chopstick).
CHOP. A Chinese word signifying quality; first introduced by mariners in the Chinese trade, but which has now become common in all our seaports. [Bartlett, "Dictionary of Americanisms," 1848]
chop-house (n.) Look up chop-house at Dictionary.com
1680s, "a mean house of entertainment, where provision ready dressed is sold" [Johnson], from chop (n.) in the "meat" sense + house (n.).
chopper (n.) Look up chopper at Dictionary.com
1550s, "one who chops," agent noun from chop (v.1). Meaning "meat cleaver" is by 1818. Meaning "helicopter" is from 1951, Korean War military slang (compare egg-beater); as a type of stripped-down motorcycle (originally preferred by Hells Angels) from 1965.
chopping (adj.) Look up chopping at Dictionary.com
"large and thriving," 1560s, past participle adjective from chop (v.). Compare strapping, whopping in similar sense.
chopping. An epithet frequently applied to infants, by way of ludicrous commendation: imagined by Skinner to signify lusty, from cas Sax. by others to mean a child that would bring money at a market. Perhaps a greedy, hungry child, likely to live. [Johnson]
choppy (adj.) Look up choppy at Dictionary.com
1830 (of seas), from chop (v.2) + -y (2). Earlier in this sense was chopping (1630s).
chops (n.) Look up chops at Dictionary.com
"jaws, sides of the face," c. 1500, perhaps a variant of chaps (n.2) in the same sense, which is of unknown origin.
chopstick (n.) Look up chopstick at Dictionary.com
also chop-stick, 1690s, sailors' partial translation of Chinese k'wai tse, variously given as "fast ones" or "nimble boys," first element from pidgin English chop, from Cantonese kap "urgent." Chopsticks, the two-fingered piano exercise, is first attested 1893, probably from the resemblance of the fingers to chopsticks.
choral (adj.) Look up choral at Dictionary.com
1580s, from Middle French choral or directly from Medieval Latin choralis "belonging to a chorus or choir," from Latin chorus (see chorus).
chorale (n.) Look up chorale at Dictionary.com
1828, "sacred choral song," from German Choral "metrical hymn in Reformed church," shortened from Choralgesang "choral song," translating Medieval Latin cantus choralis, from Latin cantus (see chant (v.)) + choralis "belonging to a chorus or choir" (see choral). The -e was added to indicate stress. Meaning "group of singers" is 1942.
chord (n.1) Look up chord at Dictionary.com
"related notes in music," 1590s, ultimately a shortening of accord (or borrowed from a similar development in French) and influenced by Latin chorda "catgut, a string" of a musical instrument (see cord (n.)). Spelling with an -h- first recorded c. 1600, from confusion with chord (n.2). Originally two notes; of three or more from 18c.
chord (n.2) Look up chord at Dictionary.com
"structure in animals resembling a string," 1540s, alteration of cord (n.), by influence of Greek khorde "gut-string, string of a lyre, tripe," from PIE *ghere- "gut, entrail" (see yarn). The geometry sense is from 1550s; meaning "feeling, emotion" first attested 1784.
Chordata Look up Chordata at Dictionary.com
1880, Modern Latin, from Latin chorda "cord, string" (see cord (n.)) + ending from Vertebrata.
chordate Look up chordate at Dictionary.com
1885, noun and adjective, from Chordata.
chore (n.) Look up chore at Dictionary.com
1751, American English, variant of char, from Middle English cherre "odd job," from Old English cerr, cierr "turn, change, time, occasion, affair business."
Chore, a corruption of char, is an English word, still used in many parts of England, as a char-man, a char-woman; but in America, it is perhaps confined to New England. It signifies small domestic jobs of work, and its place cannot be supplied by any other single word in the language. [Noah Webster, "Dissertations on the English Language," 1789]
chorea (n.) Look up chorea at Dictionary.com
1806, from Modern Latin chorea Sancti Viti "St. Vitus dance" (originally a mass hysteria in 15c. Europe characterized by uncontrolled dancing); from Latin chorea "a dance," from Greek khoreia "dance" (see chorus). Extension to the nerve disorder is from 1620s.
choreograph (v.) Look up choreograph at Dictionary.com
1943, American English, back-formation from choreography, or else from French choréographier (1827). Figurative sense from c. 1965. Related: choreographed.
choreographer (n.) Look up choreographer at Dictionary.com
1829, from choreography + -er (1). Choreographist (1857) did not thrive. In Greek, a person who trained a chorus was a khorodidaskelikos.
choreography (n.) Look up choreography at Dictionary.com
1789, from French choréographie, coined from Latinized form of Greek khoreia "dance" (see chorus) + graphein "to write" (see -graphy). Related: Choreographic.
choreology (n.) Look up choreology at Dictionary.com
"the study of dancing," 1964, from Latinized form of Greek khoreia "dance" (see chorus) + connective -o- + -logy.
choric (adj.) Look up choric at Dictionary.com
1749, from Latin choricus, from Greek khorikos, from khoros "round dance; dancing-place; band of dancers; choir" (see chorus).
chorine (n.) Look up chorine at Dictionary.com
"chorus girl," 1924, from chorus + fem. ending -ine.
chorion (n.) Look up chorion at Dictionary.com
"outer membrane of the fetus," 1540s, medical Latin, from Greek khorion "membrane enclosing the fetus, afterbirth," perhaps from PIE *ghere- "gut, entrail" (see yarn).
chorister (n.) Look up chorister at Dictionary.com
"member of a choir," mid-14c., queristre, from Anglo-French cueriste, French choriste, from Church Latin chorista, from Latin chorus (see chorus) + -ster. Modern form is from late 16c.
chorizo (n.) Look up chorizo at Dictionary.com
"spiced pork sausage," 1846, from Spanish chorizo.
chork (v.) Look up chork at Dictionary.com
mid-15c., now Scottish, "to make the noise which the feet do when the shoes are full of water" [Jamieson]. Related: Chorked; chorking.
choroid (adj.) Look up choroid at Dictionary.com
1680s, from Latinized form of Greek khoroeides, a corruption of khorioeides, from khorion (see chorion) + eidos "resemblance" (see -oid).
chortle (v.) Look up chortle at Dictionary.com
coined 1872 by Lewis Carroll in "Through the Looking Glass," perhaps from chuckle and snort. Related: Chortled; chortling. As a noun, from 1903.
chorus (n.) Look up chorus at Dictionary.com
1560s, from Latin chorus "a dance in a circle, the persons singing and dancing, the chorus of a tragedy," from Greek khoros "round dance; dancing-place; band of dancers; choir," of uncertain origin, because the original meaning is unknown. Perhaps from PIE root *gher- (1) "to grasp, enclose," if the original sense of the Greek word is "enclosed dancing floor," or *gher- (2) "to like, want," if the original notion is "to rejoice."
When a Poet wished to bring out a piece, he asked a Chorus from the Archon, and the expenses, being great, were defrayed by some rich citizen (the khoregos): it was furnished by the Tribe and trained originally by the Poet himself [Liddell & Scott]
Extension from dance to voice is because Attic drama arose from tales inserted in the intervals of the dance. In Attic tragedy, the khoros (of 12 or 15 (tragic) or 24 (comedic) persons) gave expression, between the acts, to the moral and religious sentiments evoked by the actions of the play. Originally in English used in theatrical sense; meaning of "a choir" first attested 1650s. Meaning "the refrain of a song" (which the audience joins in singing) is 1590s. As a verb, 1703, from the noun. Chorus girl is 1894.
chose Look up chose at Dictionary.com
past tense of choose (q.v.).
chosen (n.) Look up chosen at Dictionary.com
"the elect, the select," especially those selected by God, c. 1200, from past participle of choose (v.). Chosen people for "the Jews" is recorded from 1530s.
chou (n.) Look up chou at Dictionary.com
"fashionable knot in a woman's dress or hat," 1883; earlier "small, round, cream-filled pastry" (1706), from French chou, literally "cabbage" (12c.), from Latin caulis "cabbage," literally "stalk" (see cole).
chouse (n.) Look up chouse at Dictionary.com
"swindler, swindle," 1650s, said to be from Turkish chaush "sergeant, herald, messenger," but the sense connection is obscure.
chow (n.) Look up chow at Dictionary.com
"food," 1856, American English (originally in California), from Chinese pidgin English chow-chow (1795) "food," reduplication of Chinese cha or tsa "mixed." The dog breed of the same name is from 1886, of unknown origin, but some suggest a link to the Chinese tendency to see dogs as edible.
chow mein (n.) Look up chow mein at Dictionary.com
1903, American English, from Chinese ch'ao mien "fried flour."
chowder (n.) Look up chowder at Dictionary.com
1751, American English, apparently named for the pot it was cooked in: French chaudière "a pot" (12c.), from Late Latin caldaria "cooking pot" (source of Spanish calderon, Italian calderone), from Latin calidarium "hot bath," from calidus "warm, hot" (from PIE root *kele- (1) "warm"). The word and the practice introduced in Newfoundland by Breton fishermen, and spreading thence to New England.
CHOWDER. A favorite dish in New England, made of fish, pork, onions, and biscuit stewed together. Cider and champagne are sometimes added. Pic-nic parties to the sea-shore generally have a dish of chowder, prepared by themselves in some grove near the beach, from fish caught at the same time. [John Russell Bartlett, "Dictionary of Americanisms," 1859]
The derogatory chowderhead (1819) is a corruption of cholter-head (16c.), from jolthead, which is of unknown origin.
chrestomathy (n.) Look up chrestomathy at Dictionary.com
"collection of literary passages," 1774, from French chrestomathie, from Latinized form of Greek khrestomatheia "desire of learning; book containing selected passages," lit. "useful learning," from khrestos "useful" (verbal adjective of khresthai "to make use of," from PIE root *gher- (2) "to like, want") + manthanein "to learn" (from PIE root *mendh- "to learn"). Related: Chrestomathic.
Chris Look up Chris at Dictionary.com
pet or familiar form of masc. proper name Christopher or fem. proper name Christine, Christina, etc.
chrism (n.) Look up chrism at Dictionary.com
"oil mingled with balm," Old English chrisma, from Church Latin chrisma, from Greek khrisma "an unguent, anointing, unction," from khriein "to anoint," from PIE root *ghrei- "to rub" (source also of Lithuanian griejù "to skim the cream off"). Chrisom "baptismal robe," is a c. 1200 variant of this. Related: Chrismal; chrismatory.
Christ (n.) Look up Christ at Dictionary.com
title given to Jesus of Nazareth, Old English crist (by 830, perhaps 675), from Latin Christus, from Greek khristos "the anointed" (translation of Hebrew mashiah; see messiah), noun use of verbal adjective of khriein "to rub, anoint" (see chrism). The Latin term drove out Old English Hæland "healer, savior," as the preferred descriptive term for Jesus.

A title, treated as a proper name in Old English, but not regularly capitalized until 17c. Pronunciation with long -i- is result of Irish missionary work in England, 7c.-8c. The ch- form, regular since c. 1500 in English, was rare before. Capitalization of the word begins 14c. but is not fixed until 17c. The 17c. mystical sect of the Familists edged it toward a verb with Christed "made one with Christ."
Christ-like (adj.) Look up Christ-like at Dictionary.com
1670s, from Christ + like (adj.). Old English had cristlic, but the modern word appears to be a more recent formation.
Christabel Look up Christabel at Dictionary.com
fem. proper name, probably a combination of Christ + Belle.
christen (v.) Look up christen at Dictionary.com
c. 1200, from Old English cristnian "to baptize," literally "to make Christian," from cristen "Christian" (see Christian). General meaning of "to name" is attested from mid-15c. Related: Christened; christening.
Christendom (n.) Look up Christendom at Dictionary.com
Old English cristendom "Christianity, state of being a Christian," from cristen (see Christian) + -dom, suffix of condition or quality. The native formation, crowded out by Latinate Christianity except for sense "lands where Christianity is the dominant religion" (late 14c.). Similar formations in Scandinavian languages.
Christening (n.) Look up Christening at Dictionary.com
"act or ceremony of baptizing," c. 1300, verbal noun from christen (v.). Old English had cristnung.
Christer (n.) Look up Christer at Dictionary.com
"overly-zealous Christian," 1910, originally sailors' slang, from Christ + -er (1).
Christian (n., adj.) Look up Christian at Dictionary.com
16c., forms replacing earlier Christen, from Old English cristen (noun and adjective), from a West Germanic borrowing of Church Latin christianus, from Ecclesiastical Greek christianos, from Christos (see Christ). First used in Antioch, according to Acts xi.25-26. Christian Science as the name of a religious sect is from 1863.
Christianism (n.) Look up Christianism at Dictionary.com
1560s, "Christianity," from Christian + -ism. From c.2004 in reference to politicized fundamentalist Christianity in the U.S. Related: Christianist.
Christianity (n.) Look up Christianity at Dictionary.com
c. 1300, cristente, "Christians as a whole; state of being a Christian," from Old French crestienté "Christendom; spiritual authority; baptism" (Modern French chrétienté), from Church Latin christianitatem (nominative christianitas), noun of state from christianus (see Christian). Gradually respelled to conform with Latin. Christendom is the older word for it. Old English also had cristennes.