companion (n.) Look up companion at Dictionary.com
c. 1300, from Old French compagnon "fellow, mate, friend, partner" (12c.), from Late Latin companionem (nominative companio), literally "bread fellow, messmate," from Latin com "with, together" (see com-) + panis "bread," from PIE root *pa- "to feed."

Found first in 6c. Frankish Lex Salica, and probably a translation of a Germanic word (compare Gothic gahlaiba "messmate," from hlaib "loaf of bread"). Replaced Old English gefera "traveling companion," from faran "go, fare."
companionable (adj.) Look up companionable at Dictionary.com
1620s, from companion + -able. Related: Companionably; companionability.
companionship (n.) Look up companionship at Dictionary.com
1540s, from companion + -ship.
company (n.) Look up company at Dictionary.com
mid-12c., "large group of people," from Old French compagnie "society, friendship, intimacy; body of soldiers" (12c.), from Late Latin companio, literally "bread fellow, messmate," from Latin com "with, together" (see com-) + panis "bread," from PIE root *pa- "to feed." Meaning "companionship" is from late 13c. Sense of "business association" first recorded 1550s, having earlier been used in reference to trade guilds (c. 1300). Meaning "subdivision of an infantry regiment" is from 1580s. Abbreviation co. dates from 1670s.
comparable (adj.) Look up comparable at Dictionary.com
early 15c., from Middle French comparable, from Latin comparabilis "capable of comparison," from comparare (see comparison). Related: Comparably; comparability.
comparation (n.) Look up comparation at Dictionary.com
late 15c., from Latin comparationem "a putting together," hence, "a comparing," noun of action from comparare (see comparison).
comparative (adj.) Look up comparative at Dictionary.com
mid-15c., from Middle French comparatif, from Latin comparativus "pertaining to comparison," from comparat-, past participle stem of comparare (see comparison). Originally grammatical; general sense is from c. 1600; meaning "involving different branches of a subject" is from 1670s. Related: Comparatively.
comparator (n.) Look up comparator at Dictionary.com
1883, agent noun in Latin form from compare.
compare (v.) Look up compare at Dictionary.com
late 14c., from Old French comparer (12c., Modern French comparer), from Late Latin comparare "to liken, to compare," from com "with, together" (see com-) + par "equal" (see par (n.)). Related: Compared; comparing. To compare notes is from 1708. Phrase without compare (attested from 1620s, but similar phrasing dates to 1530s) seems to be altered by folk etymology from compeer "rival."
comparison (n.) Look up comparison at Dictionary.com
mid-14c., from Old French comparaison (12c.), from Latin comparationem (nominative comparatio), noun of action from past participle stem of comparare "make equal with, liken, bring together for a contest," from com "with, together" (see com-) + par "equal" (see par (n.)).
compartment (n.) Look up compartment at Dictionary.com
1560s, from Middle French compartiment "part partitioned off" (16c.), through Italian compartimento, from Late Latin compartiri "to divide," from com-, here probably as an intensive prefix (see com-), + partis, genitive of pars "a part, piece, a share, a division" (from PIE root *pere- (2) "to grant, allot").
compartmental (adj.) Look up compartmental at Dictionary.com
1831, from compartment + -al (1).
compartmentalization (n.) Look up compartmentalization at Dictionary.com
1923, from compartmentalize + noun ending -ation.
compartmentalize (v.) Look up compartmentalize at Dictionary.com
1918, from compartmental + -ize. Related: Compartmentalized; compartmentalizing.
compass (n.) Look up compass at Dictionary.com
c. 1300, "space, area, extent, circumference," from Old French compas "circle, radius, pair of compasses" (12c.), from compasser "to go around, measure, divide equally," from Vulgar Latin *compassare "to pace out," from Latin com "with, together" (see com-) + passus "a step" (from PIE root *pete- "to spread").

The mathematical instrument so called from mid-14c. The mariners' directional tool (so called since early 15c.) took the name, perhaps, because it's round and has a point like the mathematical instrument. The word is in most European languages, with a mathematical sense in Romance, a nautical sense in Germanic, and both in English.
compass (v.) Look up compass at Dictionary.com
c. 1300, "to devise, plan;" early 14c. as "to surround, contain, envelop, enclose;" from Anglo-French cumpasser, Old French compasser "to go around, measure, divide equally," from Vulgar Latin *compassare "to pace out" (source of Italian compassare, Spanish compasar), from Latin com "with, together" (see com-) + passus "a step" (from PIE root *pete- "to spread"). Related: Compassed; compassing.
compassion (n.) Look up compassion at Dictionary.com
mid-14c., from Old French compassion "sympathy, pity" (12c.), from Late Latin compassionem (nominative compassio) "sympathy," noun of state from past participle stem of compati "to feel pity," from com "with, together" (see com-) + pati "to suffer" (see passion).

Latin compassio is an ecclesiastical loan-translation of Greek sympatheia (see sympathy). An Old English loan-translation of compassion was efenðrowung.
compassionate (adj.) Look up compassionate at Dictionary.com
1580s, from compassion + -ate (1). Related: Compassionately. Phrase compassionate conservatism in American political language recorded by 1992, popularized, if not coined, by Marvin Olasky, University of Texas at Austin instructor.
compatible (adj.) Look up compatible at Dictionary.com
mid-15c., from Middle French compatible (15c.), from Medieval Latin compatibilis, from Late Latin compati (see compassion). Related: Compatibility.
compatriot (n.) Look up compatriot at Dictionary.com
1610s, from French compatriote (16c.), from Latin compatriota, from com "with, together" (see com-) + patriota "countryman" (see patriot).
comped (adj.) Look up comped at Dictionary.com
"given or admitted free," 1960s, see comp.
compeer (n.) Look up compeer at Dictionary.com
early 15c., from Middle French comper, from com- "with" (see com-) + Latin parem "equal" (see par (n.)).
compel (v.) Look up compel at Dictionary.com
mid-14c., from Old French compellir, from Latin compellere "to drive together, drive to one place" (of cattle), "to force or compel" (of persons), from com "with, together" (see com-) + pellere "to drive" (from PIE root *pel- (5) "to thrust, strike, drive"). Related: Compelled; compelling.
compelling (adj.) Look up compelling at Dictionary.com
c. 1600, present participle adjective from compel. Meaning "irresistible" is from 1901. Related: Compellingly.
compendious (adj.) Look up compendious at Dictionary.com
"concise," late 14c., from Old French compendieux, from Latin compendiosus "advantageous, abridged, brief," from compendium (see compendium).
compendium (n.) Look up compendium at Dictionary.com
1580s, from Latin compendium "a shortening, saving," literally "that which is weighed together," from compendere "to weigh together," from com "with, together" (see com-) + pendere "to hang, cause to hang; weigh; pay" (from PIE root *(s)pen- "to draw, stretch, spin"). Borrowed earlier as compendi (mid-15c.).
compensable (adj.) Look up compensable at Dictionary.com
1660s, from French compensable (16c.), from compenser, from Latin compensare (see compensate).
compensate (v.) Look up compensate at Dictionary.com
1640s, "to be equivalent;" 1650s, "to counterbalance, make up for," from Latin compensatus, past participle of compensare "to weigh one thing (against another)," thus, "to counterbalance," from com "with, together" (see com-) + pensare, frequentative of pendere "to hang, cause to hang; weigh; pay" (from PIE root *(s)pen- "to draw, stretch, spin"). Meaning "to recompense, remunerate" is from 1814. Related: Compensated; compensating.
compensation (n.) Look up compensation at Dictionary.com
late 14c., "action of compensating," from Latin compensationem (nominative compensatio) "a weighing one thing against another, a balancing," noun of action from past participle stem of compensare "to weigh one thing (against another)," thus, "to counterbalance," from com "with, together" (see com-) + pensare, frequentative of pendere "to hang, cause to hang; weigh; pay" (from PIE root *(s)pen- "to draw, stretch, spin"). Meaning "what is given in recompense" is from c. 1600; meaning "amends for loss or damages" is from 1804; meaning "salary, wages" is attested from 1787, American English. The psychological sense is from 1914.
compensatory (adj.) Look up compensatory at Dictionary.com
c. 1600, from French compensatoire, from Latin compensatus, past participle of compensare (see compensate). Psychological sense is from 1921.
compere (n.) Look up compere at Dictionary.com
1738, from French compère "a godfather," from Old French compere (13c., from Medieval Latin compater) "godfather," also a friendly greeting, "friend, brother," hence "fellow, familiar, intimate" (see compadre).
compete (v.) Look up compete at Dictionary.com
1610s, " to enter or be put in rivalry with," from Middle French compéter "be in rivalry with" (14c.), or directly from Late Latin competere "strive in common," in classical Latin "to come together, agree, to be qualified," later, "strive together," from com "with, together" (see com-) + petere "to strive, seek, fall upon, rush at, attack" (see petition (n.)).

Rare 17c., revived from late 18c. in sense "to strive (alongside another) for the attainment of something" and regarded early 19c. in Britain as a Scottish or American word. Market sense is from 1840s (perhaps a back-formation from competition); athletics sense attested by 1857. Related: Competed; competing.
competence (n.) Look up competence at Dictionary.com
1590s, "rivalry" (based on compete); c. 1600 "adequate supply;" 1630s, "sufficiency of means for living at ease," from French compétence, from Latin competentia "meeting together, agreement, symmetry," from competens, present participle of competere, especially in its earlier sense of "fall together, come together, be convenient or fitting" (see compete). Meaning "sufficiency to deal with what is at hand" is from 1790.
competency (n.) Look up competency at Dictionary.com
1590s, "rivalry;" c. 1600, "sufficiency to satisfy the wants of life," from Latin competentia "meeting together, agreement, symmetry," from competens, present participle of competere (see compete). Meaning "sufficiency of qualification" is recorded from 1797.
competent (adj.) Look up competent at Dictionary.com
late 14c., "suitable," from Old French competent "sufficient, appropriate, suitable," from Latin competentem (nominative competens), present participle of competere "coincide, agree" (see compete). Meaning "able, fit" is from 1640s. Legal sense is late 15c.
competition (n.) Look up competition at Dictionary.com
c. 1600, "action of competing," from Latin competitionem (nominative competitio) "agreement, rivalry," noun of action from past participle stem of competere (see compete). Meaning "a contest for something" is from 1610s. Sense of "rivalry in the marketplace" attested from 1793; that of "entity or entities with which one competes" is from 1961, especially in business.
competitive (adj.) Look up competitive at Dictionary.com
1826, from Latin competit-, past participle stem of competere (see compete) + -ive. Related: Competitively; competitiveness.
competitor (n.) Look up competitor at Dictionary.com
1530s, from Middle French compétiteur (16c.), or directly from Latin competitor "rival," agent noun from competere (see compete).
compilation (n.) Look up compilation at Dictionary.com
early 15c., "that which is compiled," also "action of compiling," from Middle French compilation, from Latin compilationem (nominative compilatio) "a compilation," literally "a pillaging," noun of action from compilare (see compile).
compile (v.) Look up compile at Dictionary.com
early 14c., from Old French compiler "compile, collect" (13c.), from Latin compilare "to plunder, rob," probably originally "bundle together, heap up;" hence "to pack up and carry off," from com "with, together" (see com-) + pilare "to compress, ram down." Related: Compiled; compiling.
compiler (n.) Look up compiler at Dictionary.com
early 14c., from Anglo-French compilour, Old French compileur "author, chronicler," from Latin compilatorem, agent noun from compilare (see compile). Another form of the word current in early Modern English was compilator, directly from the Latin.
complacence (n.) Look up complacence at Dictionary.com
mid-15c., "pleasure," from Medieval Latin complacentia "satisfaction, pleasure," from Latin complacentem (nominative complacens), present participle of complacere "to be very pleasing," from com-, intensive prefix (see com-), + placere "to please" (see please). Sense of "pleased with oneself" is 18c.
complacency (n.) Look up complacency at Dictionary.com
1640s, from same source as complacence but with the later form of the suffix (see -cy).
complacent (adj.) Look up complacent at Dictionary.com
1650s, "pleasing," from Latin complacentem (nominative complacens) "pleasing," present participle of complacere "be very pleasing" (see complacence). Meaning "pleased with oneself" is from 1767. Related: Complacently.
complain (v.) Look up complain at Dictionary.com
late 14c., "find fault, lament," from stem of Old French complaindre "to lament" (12c.), from Vulgar Latin *complangere, originally "to beat the breast," from Latin com-, intensive prefix (see com-), + plangere "to strike, beat the breast" (from PIE root *plak- (2) "to strike"). Older sense of "lament" died out 17c. Related: Complained; complaining.
complainant (n.) Look up complainant at Dictionary.com
early 15c., from Old French complaignant, present participle of complaindre (see complain). The present participle also was used as a noun in Middle French.
complaint (n.) Look up complaint at Dictionary.com
late 14c., "lamentation, grief," from Old French complainte (12c.) "complaint, lament," noun use of fem. past participle of complaindre (see complain). Meaning "bodily ailment" is from 1705 (often in U.S. colloquial use generalized as complaints).
complaisance (n.) Look up complaisance at Dictionary.com
1650s, from French complaisance (14c.), in Middle French "care or desire to please," from Medieval Latin complacentia (see complacence).
complaisant (adj.) Look up complaisant at Dictionary.com
1640s, from French complaisant (16c.), in Middle French, "pleasing," present participle of complaire "acquiesce to please," from Latin complacere "be very pleasing" (see complacent, with which it overlapped till mid-19c.). Possibly influenced in French by Old French plaire "gratify."
compleat (adj.) Look up compleat at Dictionary.com
archaic spelling of complete (adj.).