complected (adj.) Look up complected at Dictionary.com
1806, American English, "complexioned," a variant derivation from complexion, which, intentionally or not, shows the Latin root.
complement (v.) Look up complement at Dictionary.com
1610s, "exchange courtesies," from complement (n.). Meaning "make complete" is from 1640s. Related: Complemented; complementing.
complement (n.) Look up complement at Dictionary.com
late 14c., "that which completes," from Old French compliement "accomplishment, fulfillment" (14c., Modern French complément), from Latin complementum "that which fills up or completes," from complere "fill up" (see complete (adj.)). Originally also having senses which were taken up c. 1650-1725 by compliment.
complementarity (n.) Look up complementarity at Dictionary.com
1908, a term in physics, from complementary + -ity.
complementary (adj.) Look up complementary at Dictionary.com
1620s, "ceremonious," from complement + -ary. Sense "forming a complement" attested from 1829, earliest in complementary colors.
complete (v.) Look up complete at Dictionary.com
late 14c.; see complete (adj.). Related: Completed; completing.
complete (adj.) Look up complete at Dictionary.com
late 14c., from Old French complet "full," or directly from Latin completus, past participle of complere "to fill up, complete the number of (a legion, etc.)," transferred to "fulfill, finish (a task)," from com-, here probably as an intensive prefix (see com-), + plere "to fill" (from PIE root *pele- (1) "to fill").
completely (adv.) Look up completely at Dictionary.com
1520s, from complete (adj.) + -ly (2).
completion (n.) Look up completion at Dictionary.com
late 14c., from Latin completionem (nominative completio), noun of action from past participle stem of complere "to fill up, complete" (see complete (adj.)).
complex (n.) Look up complex at Dictionary.com
1650s, "a whole comprised of parts," from complex (adj.). Psychological sense of "connected group of repressed ideas" was established by C.G. Jung, 1907.
complex (adj.) Look up complex at Dictionary.com
1650s, "composed of parts," from French complexe "complicated, complex, intricate" (17c.), from Latin complexus "surrounding, encompassing," past participle of complecti "to encircle, embrace," in transferred use, "to hold fast, master, comprehend," from com "with, together" (see com-) + plectere "to weave, braid, twine, entwine," from PIE *plek-to-, suffixed form of root *plek- "to plait." The meaning "not easily analyzed" is first recorded 1715. Complex sentence is attested from 1881.
complexion (n.) Look up complexion at Dictionary.com
mid-14c., "bodily constitution," from Old French complexion, complession "combination of humors," hence "temperament, character, make-up," from Latin complexionem (nominative complexio) "combination" (in Late Latin, "physical constitution"), from complexus "surrounding, encompassing," past participle of complecti "to encircle, embrace," in transferred use, "to hold fast, master, comprehend," from com "with, together" (see com-) + plectere "to weave, braid, twine, entwine," from PIE *plek-to-, suffixed form of root *plek- "to plait."

Meaning "appearance of the skin of the face" is first recorded mid-15c. In medieval physiology, the color of the face indicated temperament or health.
complexity (n.) Look up complexity at Dictionary.com
1721, "composite nature," from complex (adj.) + -ity. Meaning "intricacy" is from 1790. Meaning "a complex condition" is from 1794.
compliance (n.) Look up compliance at Dictionary.com
1640s, from comply + -ance. Related: Compliancy.
compliant (adj.) Look up compliant at Dictionary.com
1640s, from comply + -ant.
complicate (v.) Look up complicate at Dictionary.com
1620s, "to intertwine" (as a past participle adjective, early 15c.), from Latin complicatus "folded together; confused, intricate," past participle of complicare "to involve," literally "to fold together," from com "with, together" (see com-) + plicare "to fold, weave" (from PIE root *plek- "to plait"). Meaning "to make more complex" is recorded from 1832, from earlier sense "to combine in a complex way" (17c.). Related: Complicated; complicating.
complicated (adj.) Look up complicated at Dictionary.com
1640s, "tangled," from past participle adjective from complicate. Figurative meaning "not easy to solve, intricate, confused, difficult to unravel" is from 1650s.
complication (n.) Look up complication at Dictionary.com
early 15c., from Middle French complication, from Latin complicationem (nominative complicatio), noun of action from past participle stem of complicare "to fold together, fold up, roll up," from com "with, together" (see com-) + plicare "to fold, weave" (from PIE root *plek- "to plait"). Meaning "something that complicates" first recorded 1903.
complicity (n.) Look up complicity at Dictionary.com
1650s, from French complicité, from Old French complice "accomplice, comrade, companion" (14c.), from Late Latin complicem, accusative of complex "partner, confederate," from Latin complicare "to fold together," from com "with, together" (see com-) + plicare "to fold, weave" (from PIE root *plek- "to plait"). Compare accomplice.
compliment (v.) Look up compliment at Dictionary.com
1610s, from French complimenter, from compliment (see compliment (n.)). Related: Complimented; complimenting.
compliment (n.) Look up compliment at Dictionary.com
"An act, or expression of civility, usually understood to include some hypocrisy, and to mean less than it declares" [Johnson], 1570s, complement, via French compliment (17c.), from Italian complimento "expression of respect and civility," from Vulgar Latin *complire, for Latin complere "to complete" (see complete (adj.)), via notion of "complete the obligations of politeness." Same word as complement but by a different etymological route; differentiated by spelling after 1650.
complimentary (adj.) Look up complimentary at Dictionary.com
1620s, "conveying a compliment," from compliment (n.) + -ary. In later use loosely meaning "free of charge."
compline (n.) Look up compline at Dictionary.com
the last canonical service of the day, early 13c., cumplie, compelin, from Old French complie (12c.), from Latin completa (hora), from completus (see complete (adj.)); with unexplained -n-.
comply (v.) Look up comply at Dictionary.com
early 14c., "to fulfill, carry out," from Old French compli, past participle of complir "to accomplish, fulfill, carry out," from Vulgar Latin *complire, from Latin complere "to fill up," transferred to "fulfill, finish (a task)," from com-, here probably as an intensive prefix (see com-), + plere "to fill" (from PIE root *pele- (1) "to fill"). Meaning influenced by ply (v.2). Sense of "to consent" began c. 1600 and might have been a reintroduction from Italian, where complire had come to mean "satisfy by 'filling up' the forms of courtesy."
component (n.) Look up component at Dictionary.com
1640s, "constitutional element" (earlier "one of a group of persons," 1560s), from Latin componentem (nominative componens), present participle of componere "to put together" (see composite). As an adjective, from 1660s.
componentry (n.) Look up componentry at Dictionary.com
1956, from component + -ry.
comport (v.) Look up comport at Dictionary.com
late 14c., from Old French comporter "endure, admit, behave" (13c.), from Latin comportare "to bring together, collect," from com "with, together" (see com-) + portare "to carry" (from PIE root *per- (2) "to lead, pass over"). Meaning "to agree with, suit" (with with) is from 1580s. Related: Comported; comporting.
comportment (n.) Look up comportment at Dictionary.com
c. 1600, from Middle French comportement "bearing, behavior," from comporter (13c.) "to be disposed, arranged, laid out," from Latin comportare (see comport).
compos mentis Look up compos mentis at Dictionary.com
Latin, literally "in command of one's mind;" from compos "having the mastery of," from com "with, together" (see com-) + stem of potis "powerful, master" (see potent); + mentis, genitive of mens "mind" (from PIE root *men- (1) "to think").
compose (v.) Look up compose at Dictionary.com
c. 1400, compousen, from Old French composer "put together, arrange, write" a work (12c.), from com "with, together" (see com-) + poser "to place," from Late Latin pausare "to cease, lay down" (see pause (n.)). Meaning influenced in Old French by componere (see composite; also see pose (v.)). Musical sense is from 1590s. Related: Composed; composing.
composed (adj.) Look up composed at Dictionary.com
"calm, tranquil," c. 1600, past participle adjective frome compose (v.). Related: Composedly; composedness.
composer (n.) Look up composer at Dictionary.com
"one who writes and arranges music," 1590s, agent noun from compose. Used in general sense of "one who combines into a whole" from 1640s, but the music sense remains the predominant one.
composite (adj.) Look up composite at Dictionary.com
c. 1400, from Old French composite, from Latin compositus "placed together," past participle of componere "to put together, to collect a whole from several parts," from com "with, together" (see com-) + ponere "to place" (past participle positus; see position (n.)). The noun is attested from c. 1400. Composite number is from 1730s.
composition (n.) Look up composition at Dictionary.com
late 14c., "action of combining," also "manner in which a thing is composed," from Old French composicion (13c., Modern French composition) "composition, make-up, literary work, agreement, settlement," from Latin compositionem (nominative compositio) "a putting together, connecting, arranging," noun of action from past participle stem of componere (see composite). Meaning "art of constructing sentences" is from 1550s; that of "literary production" (often also "writing exercise for students") is from c. 1600. Printing sense is 1832; meaning "arrangement of parts in a picture" is from 1706.
compositional (adj.) Look up compositional at Dictionary.com
1815, from composition + -al (1).
compositor (n.) Look up compositor at Dictionary.com
"a typesetter engaged in picking up arranging and distributing letters or type in a printing office," 1560s, agent noun from past participle stem of Latin componere (see composite).
compost (v.) Look up compost at Dictionary.com
"make into compost," 1829, from compost (n.). Related: Composted; composting.
compost (n.) Look up compost at Dictionary.com
late 14c., compote, from Old French composte "mixture of leaves, manure, etc., for fertilizing land" (13c.), also "condiment," from Vulgar Latin *composita, noun use of fem. of Latin compositus, past participle of componere "to put together" (see composite). The fertilizer sense is attested in English from 1580s, and the French word in this sense is a 19th century borrowing from English.
composure (n.) Look up composure at Dictionary.com
c. 1600, "composition" (also, in early use, with many senses now given to compound), from compose + -ure. Sense of "tranquility, calmness" is first recorded 1660s, from composed "calm" (1620s). For sense, compare colloquial to fall apart "to lose one's composure."
compote (n.) Look up compote at Dictionary.com
1690s, from French compote "stewed fruit," from Old French composte (13c.) "mixture, compost," from Vulgar Latin *composita, fem. of compositus (see composite). Etymologically the same word as compost (n.).
compound (adj.) Look up compound at Dictionary.com
late 14c., originally compouned, past participle of compounen (see compound (v.)). Compound eye is attested from 1836; compound sentence is from 1772.
compound (n.2) Look up compound at Dictionary.com
"a compound thing," mid-15c., from compound (adj.).
compound (v.) Look up compound at Dictionary.com
"to put together," late 14c., compounen "to mix, combine," from Old French compondre, componre "arrange, direct," from Latin componere "to put together" (see composite). The -d appeared 1500s in English on model of expound, etc. Related: Compounded; compounding.
compound (n.1) Look up compound at Dictionary.com
1670s, via Dutch (kampoeng) or Portuguese, from Malay kampong "village, group of buildings." Spelling influenced by compound (v.). Originally, "the enclosure for a factory or settlement of Europeans in the East," later used of South African diamond miners' camps (1893), then of large fenced-in spaces generally (1946).
comprehend (v.) Look up comprehend at Dictionary.com
mid-14c., "to understand," from Latin comprehendere "to take together, to unite; include; seize" (of catching fire or the arrest of criminals); also "to comprehend, perceive" (to seize or take in the mind), from com "with, together," here "completely" (see com-) + prehendere "to catch hold of, seize" (see prehensile). Related: Comprehended; comprehending. Compare sense development in German begriefen, literally "to seize," but, through the writings of the 14c. mystics, "to seize with the mind, to comprehend."
comprehendible (adj.) Look up comprehendible at Dictionary.com
1814 (rare), from comprehend + -ible; a native formation alongside comprehensible.
comprehensible (adj.) Look up comprehensible at Dictionary.com
1520s, "able to be contained," from Latin comprehensibilis, from comprehensus, past participle of comphrehendere (see comprehend). Meaning "able to be understood" is from c. 1600. Related: Comprehensibly; comprehensibility.
comprehension (n.) Look up comprehension at Dictionary.com
mid-15c., from Middle French comprehénsion (15c.), from Latin comprehensionem (nominative comprehensio) "a seizing, laying hold of, arrest," figuratively "perception, comprehension," noun of action from past participle stem of comprehendere (see comprehend). In reading education, from 1921.
comprehensive (adj.) Look up comprehensive at Dictionary.com
"containing much," 1610s, from French comprehénsif, from Late Latin comprehensivus, from comprehens-, past participle stem of Latin comprehendere (see comprehend). Related: Comprehensively (mid-15c.); comprehensiveness.
compress (n.) Look up compress at Dictionary.com
1590s in the surgical sense, from compress (v.).