concuss (v.) Look up concuss at Dictionary.com
1590s, "to shake violently," from Latin concuss-, past participle stem of concutere "to dash together, shake violently" (see concussion). Meaning "to give a concussion to the brain" is from 1680s. Related: Concussed; concussing; concussive.
concussion (n.) Look up concussion at Dictionary.com
c. 1400, from Latin concussionem (nominative concussio) "a shaking," noun of action from past participle stem of concutere "shake violently," from com "with, together" (see com-) + quatere "to shake" (see quash). Modern brain injury sense is from 1540s.
condemn (v.) Look up condemn at Dictionary.com
early 14c., condempner "to blame, censure," from Old French condamner "to condemn" (11c.), from Latin condemnare "to sentence, doom, blame, disapprove," from com, intensive prefix (see com-), + damnare "to harm, damage" (see damn). Replaced Old English fordeman. Related: Condemned; condemning.
condemnation (n.) Look up condemnation at Dictionary.com
late 14c., from Latin condemnationem (nominative condemnatio), noun of action from past participle stem of condemnare (see condemn).
condemnatory (adj.) Look up condemnatory at Dictionary.com
late 16c., from Latin condemnat-, past participle stem of condemnare (see condemn) + -ory.
condemned (adj.) Look up condemned at Dictionary.com
1540s, "found guilty, at fault," past participle adjective from condemn. Of property, "found unfit for use," from 1798.
condensate (v.) Look up condensate at Dictionary.com
1550s, "to make dense," from condens-, past participle stem of Latin condensare (see condense) + -ate (2). Meaning "to become dense" is from c. 1600.
condensation (n.) Look up condensation at Dictionary.com
c. 1600, "action of becoming more dense," from Latin condensationem (nominative condensatio), noun of action from condensare (see condense). Meaning "conversion of a gas to a liquid" is from 1610s.
condense (v.) Look up condense at Dictionary.com
early 15c., from Middle French condenser (14c.) or directly from Latin condensare "to make dense," from com-, intensive prefix (see com-), + densare "make thick," from densus "dense, thick, crowded," a word used of crowds, darkness, clouds, etc. (see dense).
condensed (adj.) Look up condensed at Dictionary.com
c. 1600, "made more dense," past participle adjective from condense. Of literary works, from 1823. Condensed milk attested by 1863.
condenser (n.) Look up condenser at Dictionary.com
1680s, agent noun from condense. Given a wide variety of technical uses in late 18c. and 19c.
condescend (adj.) Look up condescend at Dictionary.com
mid-14c., "to yield deferentially," from Old French condescendere (14c.) "to agree, consent, give in, yield," from Late Latin condescendere "to let oneself down," from Latin com "with, together" (see com-) + descendere "descend" (see descend). Sense of "to sink willingly to equal terms with inferiors" is from mid-15c.
condescendence (n.) Look up condescendence at Dictionary.com
1630s, from French condescendance, from condescendre, from Latin condescendere (see condescend).
condescending (adj.) Look up condescending at Dictionary.com
1707, present participle adjective from condescend. Originally in a positive sense (of God, the Savior, etc.) until late 18c. Related: Condescendingly (1650s).
condescension (n.) Look up condescension at Dictionary.com
1640s, from Late Latin condescensionem, noun of action from past participle stem of condescendere (see condescend).
condescent (n.) Look up condescent at Dictionary.com
mid-15c., from condescend on model of descent.
condign (adj.) Look up condign at Dictionary.com
late 15c., "well-deserved," from Old French condigne "deserved, appropriate, equal in wealth," from Latin condignus "wholly worthy," from com- "together, altogether" (see com-) + dignus "worth (n.), worthy, proper, fitting," from PIE root *dek- "to take, accept." Of punishment, "deservedly severe," from 1510s, which by Johnson's day (1755) was the only use.
condiment (n.) Look up condiment at Dictionary.com
early 15c., from Old French condiment (13c.), from Latin condimentum "spice, seasoning, sauce," from condire "to preserve, pickle, season," variant of condere "put together, store," from assimilated form of com- "together" (see com-) + -dere "put," from PIE root *dhe- "to put, place."
condition (v.) Look up condition at Dictionary.com
late 15c., "to make conditions," from condition (n.). Meaning "to bring to a desired condition" is from 1844. Related: Conditioned; conditioning.
condition (n.) Look up condition at Dictionary.com
early 14c., condicioun, from Old French condicion "stipulation, state, behavior, social status" (12c., Modern French condition), from Latin condicionem (nominative condicio) "agreement, situation," from condicere "to speak with, talk together," from com- "together" (see com-) + dicere "to speak" (from PIE root *deik- "to show," also "pronounce solemnly"). Evolution of meaning through "stipulation, condition," to "situation, mode of being."
conditional (adj.) Look up conditional at Dictionary.com
late 14c., condicionel, from Old French condicionel (Modern French conditionnel), from Latin conditionalis, from condicionem (see condition (n.)). Related: Conditionally.
conditioner (n.) Look up conditioner at Dictionary.com
c. 1600, "a bargainer," agent noun from condition (v.). Meaning "an agent that brings something into good condition" is from 1888; since c. 1960 usually in reference to hair care products. For about 20 years before that, it often was short for air conditioner.
condo (n.) Look up condo at Dictionary.com
1964, short for condominium.
condole (v.) Look up condole at Dictionary.com
late 15c., "to sorrow," from Late Latin condolere "to suffer with another," from com "with, together" (see com-) + dolere "to grieve" (see doleful). Meaning "to express condolences" is recorded from 1650s. Related: Condoled; condoling.
condolence (n.) Look up condolence at Dictionary.com
c. 1600, from Late Latin condolere "to suffer together" (see condole) + -ence. Often in form condoleance 1600-1800.
condolences (n.) Look up condolences at Dictionary.com
"formal declaration of sympathy," 1670s, plural of condolence. Reason for the plural is unclear; earliest references are to expressions from groups of persons; perhaps the habit stuck.
condom (n.) Look up condom at Dictionary.com
1706, traditionally named for a British physician during reign of Charles II (a story traceable to 1709), but there is no evidence for that. Also spelled condam, quondam, which suggests it may be from Italian guantone, from guanto "a glove." A word omitted in the original OED (c. 1890) and not used openly in the U.S. and not advertised in mass media until November 1986 speech by Surgeon General C. Everett Koop on AIDS prevention. Compare prophylactic.
condominium (n.) Look up condominium at Dictionary.com
c. 1714, "joint rule or sovereignty," from Modern Latin condominium "joint sovereignty," apparently coined in German c. 1700 from Latin com "with, together" (see com-) + dominum "right of ownership, property, dominion," from dominus "lord, master, owner," from domus "house" (from PIE root *dem- "house, household"). A word in politics and international law until sense of "privately owned apartment" arose in American English 1962 as a special use of the legal term.
condonation (n.) Look up condonation at Dictionary.com
1620s, from Latin condonationem (nominative condonatio) "a giving away," noun of action from condonare (see condone).
condone (v.) Look up condone at Dictionary.com
1857, from Latin condonare "to give up, remit, permit," from com-, intensive prefix (see com-), + donare "give as a gift," from donum "gift," from PIE *donum "gift," from root *do- "to give." Originally a legal term in the Matrimonial Causes Act, which made divorce a civil matter in Britain. Related: Condoned; condoning.
condor (n.) Look up condor at Dictionary.com
c. 1600, from American Spanish, from Quechua cuntur, the native name for the bird.
conduce (v.) Look up conduce at Dictionary.com
c. 1400, from Latin conducere "to lead or bring together, contribute, serve," from com "with, together" (see com-) + ducere "to lead," from PIE root *deuk- "to lead."
conducive (adj.) Look up conducive at Dictionary.com
1640s, from conduce + -ive.
conduct (v.) Look up conduct at Dictionary.com
early 15c., "to guide," from Latin conductus, past participle of conducere "to lead or bring together" (see conduce). Sense of "convey" is from early 15c.; that of "to direct, manage" is from 1630s; "to behave in a certain way" from c. 1710; "to convey" from 1740. Related: Conducted; conducting. Earlier verb in the same sense was condyten (c. 1400), related to conduit. The noun is from mid-15c., "guide" (in sauf conducte); sense of "behavior" is first recorded 1670s.
conduction (n.) Look up conduction at Dictionary.com
1530s, "hiring;" 1540s, "leading, guidance," from Old French conduction "hire, renting," from Latin conductionem (nominative conductio), noun of action from past participle stem of conducere (see conduce). Sense of "conducting of a liquid through a channel" is from 1610s; in physics, of heat, etc., from 1814.
conductive (adj.) Look up conductive at Dictionary.com
1520s, from conduct + -ive. Physics sense is from 1840. Related: Conductivity (1837).
conductor (n.) Look up conductor at Dictionary.com
1520s, "one who leads or guides," from Middle French conductour (14c., Old French conduitor), from Latin conductor "one who hires, contractor," in Late Latin "a carrier," from conductus, past participle of conducere "to lead or bring together, contribute, serve," from com "with, together" (see com-) + ducere "to lead," from PIE root *deuk- "to lead."

Earlier in same sense was conduitour (early 15c., from Old French conduitor). Meaning "leader of an orchestra or chorus" is from 1784; meaning "one who has charge of passengers and collects fares on a railroad" is 1832, American English. Physics sense of "object or device that passes heat" is from 1745; of electricity from 1737.
conduit (n.) Look up conduit at Dictionary.com
c. 1300, conduyt, from Old French conduit (12c.) "escort, protection; pipe, channel," from Latin conductus "a leading, a pipe" (see conduct). A doublet of conduct, differentiated in meaning from 15c.
condyle (n.) Look up condyle at Dictionary.com
1630s, "knob at the end of a bone," from French condyle (16c.), from Latin condylus, from Greek kondylos "a knuckle," which is of unknown origin.
cone (n.) Look up cone at Dictionary.com
1560s, from Middle French cone (16c.) or directly from Latin conus "a cone, peak of a helmet," from Greek konos "cone, spinning top, pine cone," perhaps from PIE root *ko- "to sharpen" (source also of Sanskrit sanah "whetstone," Latin catus "sharp," Old English han "stone").
Conestoga Look up Conestoga at Dictionary.com
1690s, name of an Indian tribe in southcentral Pennsylvania, probably from some Iroquoian language and sometimes said to mean "people of the cabin pole;" later a place in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania. A characteristic type of covered wagon, called Conestoga wagon, was built there from 1750 (about three years before the last of the Conestoga Indians were massacred), but it already was an established term, as the first reference is to the name of a Philadelphia tavern, and probably originally meant the type of wagon farmers used on the road from the city to Conestoga. Also a breed of horses (1824) and a type of boot and cigar (see stogie).
coney (n.) Look up coney at Dictionary.com
c. 1200, from Anglo-French conis, plural of conil "long-eared rabbit" (Lepus cunicula) from Latin cuniculus (source of Spanish conejo, Portuguese coelho, Italian coniglio), the small, Spanish variant of the Italian hare (Latin lepus), the word perhaps from Iberian Celtic (classical writers say it is Spanish).

Rabbit arose 14c. to mean the young of the species, but gradually pushed out the older word 19c., after British slang picked up coney as a punning synonym for cunny "cunt" (compare connyfogle "to deceive in order to win a woman's sexual favors"). The word was in the King James Bible (Proverbs xxx.26, etc.), however, so it couldn't be entirely dropped, and the solution was to change the pronunciation of the original short vowel (rhyming with honey, money) to rhyme with boney. In the Old Testament, the word translates Hebrew shaphan "rock-badger." Rabbits not being native to northern Europe, there was no Germanic or Celtic word for them.
Coney Island Look up Coney Island at Dictionary.com
community in Brooklyn, N.Y., so called for the rabbits once found there (see coney) and was known to the Dutch as Konijn Eiland, from which the English name probably derives. It emerged as a resort and amusement park center after the U.S. Civil War.
confab (n.) Look up confab at Dictionary.com
1701, colloquial shortening of confabulation.
confabulate (v.) Look up confabulate at Dictionary.com
1610s, from confabulatus, past participle of Latin confabulari "to converse together," from com "with, together" (see com-) + fabulari "to talk, chat," from fabula "a tale" (see fable). Psychiatric sense is from 1924.
confabulation (n.) Look up confabulation at Dictionary.com
mid-15c., "talking together," from Late Latin confabulationem (nominative confabulatio), noun of action from past participle stem of Latin confabulari (see confabulate).
confarreation (n.) Look up confarreation at Dictionary.com
c. 1600, from Latin confarreationem, from confarreare "to unite in marriage by the Ceremony of the Cake," from com- "with, together" (see com-) + far, farris "spelt, grain, meal" (see barley). In ancient Rome, the most solemn form of marriage, in which an offering of bread was made in the presence of the Pontifex Maximus and 10 witnesses.
confection (n.) Look up confection at Dictionary.com
mid-14c., confescioun, from Old French confeccion (12c., Modern French confection) "drawing up (of a treaty, etc.); article, product," in pharmacology, "mixture, compound," from Late Latin confectionem (nominative confectio) "a confection," in classical Latin, "a making, preparing," noun of action from confect-, past participle stem of conficere "to prepare," from com- "with" (see com-) + combining form of facere "to make, to do" (from PIE root *dhe- "to set, put"). Originally "the making by means of ingredients," sense of "candy or light pastry" predominated from 16c.
confectionary (n.) Look up confectionary at Dictionary.com
c. 1600, "confection maker," also "confection maker's shop," from confection + -ary. As an adjective, from 1660s.
confectioner (n.) Look up confectioner at Dictionary.com
1590s, agent noun from confection.