cannibalization (n.) Look up cannibalization at Dictionary.com
by 1907, noun of action from cannibalize.
cannibalize (v.) Look up cannibalize at Dictionary.com
1798 (in Burke's memoirs), figurative, and meaning "be perverted into cannibalism," from cannibal + -ize. Meaning "take parts from one construction and use them in another" is from 1943, originally of military equipment. Related: Cannibalized; cannibalizing.
cannister (n.) Look up cannister at Dictionary.com
obsolete form of canister.
cannon (n.) Look up cannon at Dictionary.com
c. 1400, "tube for projectiles," from Anglo-French canon, Old French canon (14c.), from Italian cannone "large tube, barrel," augmentative of Latin canna "reed, tube" (see cane (n.)). Meaning "large ordnance piece," the main modern sense, is from 1520s. Spelling not differentiated from canon till c. 1800. Cannon fodder (1891) translates German kanonenfutter (compare Shakespeare's food for powder in "I Hen. IV").
cannon-ball (n.) Look up cannon-ball at Dictionary.com
also cannon ball, 1660s, from cannon (n.) + ball (n.1). As a type of dive, from 1905.
cannon-shot (n.) Look up cannon-shot at Dictionary.com
"distance a cannon will throw a ball," 1570s, from cannon (n.) + shot (n.).
cannonade (n.) Look up cannonade at Dictionary.com
"discharge of artillery," 1650s, from cannon + -ade. As a verb, from 1660s. Compare French canonnade (16c.), Italian cannonata. Related: Cannonaded; cannonading.
cannot (v.) Look up cannot at Dictionary.com
c. 1400, from can (v.1) + not. Old English expressed the notion by ne cunnan.
cannula (n.) Look up cannula at Dictionary.com
1680s in surgical sense, from Latin cannula "small reed or pipe," diminutive of canna "reed, pipe" (see cane (n.)).
canny (adj.) Look up canny at Dictionary.com
1630s, Scottish and northern English formation from can (v.1) in its sense of "know how to," + -y (2). "Knowing," hence, "careful." A doublet of cunning that flowed into distinct senses. Often used superciliously of Scots by their southern neighbors (and their American cousins).
The Canny Scot is so well known as scarcely to require description. He carries caution, cunning, and selfishness to excess. Deceitful when a purpose is to be accomplished, he is not habitually deceitful. One thing he never loses sight of--his own interest. But of his own interest he is not the most enlightened judge. ["The Natural History of Scotsmen," in "The Argosy," December 1865]
Related: Cannily; canniness.
canoe (n.) Look up canoe at Dictionary.com
1550s, originally in a West Indian context, from Spanish canoa, a term used by Columbus, from Arawakan (Haiti) canaoua. Extended to rough-made or dugout boats generally. Early variants in English included cano, canow, canoa, etc., before spelling settled down c. 1600.
canoe (v.) Look up canoe at Dictionary.com
1842, from canoe (n.). Related: Canoed; canoing.
canoeing (n.) Look up canoeing at Dictionary.com
1870, verbal noun from canoe (v.). Related: Canoeist.
canola (n.) Look up canola at Dictionary.com
"rapeseed," a euphemistic name coined 1978, supposedly involving Canada, where it was developed, and the root of oil (n.).
canon (n.1) Look up canon at Dictionary.com
"church law," Old English canon, from Old French canon or directly from Late Latin canon "Church law," in classical Latin, "measuring line, rule," from Greek kanon "any straight rod or bar; rule; standard of excellence," perhaps from kanna "reed" (see cane (n.)). Taken in ecclesiastical sense for "decree of the Church." General sense of "standard of judging" is from c. 1600. Harold Bloom writes that "The secular canon, with the word meaning a catalog of approved authors, does not actually begin until the middle of the eighteenth century ...." ["The Western Canon," 1994]. Related: Canonicity.
canon (n.2) Look up canon at Dictionary.com
"clergyman," c. 1200, from Anglo-French canun, from Old North French canonie (Modern French chanoine), from Church Latin canonicus "clergyman living under a rule," noun use of Latin adjective canonicus "according to rule" (in ecclesiastical use, "pertaining to the canon"), from Greek kanonikos, from kanon "rule" (see canon (n.1)).
canonical (adj.) Look up canonical at Dictionary.com
early 15c., "according to ecclesiastical law," from Medieval Latin canonicalis, from Late Latin canonicus "according to rule," in Church Latin, "pertaining to the canon" (see canon (n.1)). Earlier was canonial (early 13c.).
canonization (n.) Look up canonization at Dictionary.com
late 14c., from Medieval Latin canonizationem (nominative canonizatio), noun of action from past participle stem of canonizare (see canonize).
canonize (v.) Look up canonize at Dictionary.com
late 14c., "to place in the canon or calendar of saints," from Old French cannonisier and directly from Medieval Latin canonizare, from Late Latin canon "church rule" (see canon (n.1)). Related: Canonized; cannonizing.
canoodle (v.) Look up canoodle at Dictionary.com
"to indulge in caresses and fondling endearments" [OED], by 1850s, said to be U.S. slang, of uncertain origin. The earliest known sources are British, but they tend to identify the word as American. In the 1830s it seems to have been in use in Britain in a sense of "cheat" or "overpower." Related: Canoodled; canoodling.
Canopus (n.) Look up Canopus at Dictionary.com
bright southern star, 1550s, ultimately from Greek Kanopos, Kanobos perhaps from Egyptian Kahi Nub "golden earth." The association with "weight" found in the name of the star in some northern tongues may reflect the fact that it never rises far above the horizon in those latitudes. Also the name of a town in ancient lower Egypt (famous for its temple of Serapis), hence canopic jar, canopic vase, which often held the entrails of embalmed bodies (1878).
canopy (n.) Look up canopy at Dictionary.com
late 14c., from Old French conope "bed-curtain" (Modern French canapé), from Medieval Latin canopeum, dissimilated from Latin conopeum, from Greek konopeion "Egyptian couch with mosquito curtains," from konops "mosquito, gnat," which is of unknown origin. The same word (canape) in French, Spanish, and Portuguese now means "sofa, couch." Italian canape is a French loan word.
canopy (v.) Look up canopy at Dictionary.com
c. 1600, from canopy (n.). Related: Canopied; canopying.
cant (n.1) Look up cant at Dictionary.com
"insincere talk," 1709, earlier it was slang for "whining of beggars" (1640s), from the verb in this sense (1560s), from Old North French canter (Old French chanter) "to sing, chant," from Latin cantare, frequentative of canere "to sing" (see chant (v.)). Sense in English developed after 1680 to mean the jargon of criminals and vagabonds, thence applied contemptuously by any sect or school to the phraseology of its rival.
... Slang is universal, whilst Cant is restricted in usage to certain classes of the community: thieves, vagrom men, and -- well, their associates. ... Slang boasts a quasi-respectability denied to Cant, though Cant is frequently more enduring, its use continuing without variation of meaning for many generations. [John S. Farmer, Forewords to "Musa Pedestris," 1896]
cant (n.2) Look up cant at Dictionary.com
"slope, slant," late 14c., Scottish, "edge, brink," from Old North French cant "corner" (perhaps via Middle Low German kante or Middle Dutch kant), from Vulgar Latin *canthus, from Latin cantus "iron tire of a wheel," possibly from a Celtic word meaning "rim of wheel, edge" (compare Welsh cant "bordering of a circle, tire, edge," Breton cant "circle"), from PIE *kam-bo- "corner, bend," from root *kemb- "to bend, turn, change" (source also of Greek kanthos "corner of the eye," Russian kutu "corner").
cantabile (adj.) Look up cantabile	 at Dictionary.com
1724, from Italian, literally "singable, that can be sung," from cantare "to sing" (see chant (v.)).
Cantabrigian (adj.) Look up Cantabrigian at Dictionary.com
"pertaining to Cambridge," 1540s, from Medieval Latin Cantabrigia (see Cambridge) + -an.
cantaloupe (n.) Look up cantaloupe at Dictionary.com
also cantaloup, 1739, from French, from Italian, from Cantalupo, name of a former Papal summer estate near Rome, where the melons first were grown in Europe after their introduction (supposedly from Armenia). The place name seems to be "singing wolf" and might refer to a spot where wolves gathered, but this might be folk etymology.
cantankerous (adj.) Look up cantankerous at Dictionary.com
1772, said to be "a Wiltshire word," probably from an alteration (influenced by raucous) of Middle English contakour "troublemaker" (c. 1300), from Anglo-French contec "discord, strife," from Old French contechier (Old North French contekier), from con- "with" + teche, related to atachier "hold fast" (see attach). With -ous. Related: Cantankerously; cantankerousness.
cantata (n.) Look up cantata at Dictionary.com
1724, from Italian cantata, literally "that which is sung," past participle of cantare "to sing" (see chant (v.)).
canteen (n.) Look up canteen at Dictionary.com
c. 1710, "store in a military camp," from French cantine "sutler's shop" (17c.), from Italian cantina "wine cellar, vault," which is perhaps another of the many meanings that were attached to Latin canto "corner;" in this case, perhaps "corner for storage." A Gaulish origin also has been proposed. Extended to "refreshment room at a military base, school, etc." from 1870. Meaning "small tin for water or liquor, carried by soldiers on the march, campers, etc." is from 1744, from a sense in French.
canter (v.) Look up canter at Dictionary.com
1706, from a contraction of Canterbury gallop (1630s), "easy pace at which pilgrims ride to Canterbury" (q.v.). Related: Cantered; cantering.
canter (n.) Look up canter at Dictionary.com
1755, from canter (v.).
Canterbury Look up Canterbury at Dictionary.com
Old English Cantware-buruh "fortified town of the Kentish people," from Cant-ware "the people of Kent" (see Kent). The Roman name was Duroverno, from Romano-British *duro- "walled town."

Pope Gregory the Great intended to make London, as the largest southern Anglo-Saxon city, the metropolitan see of southern England, but Christianity got a foothold first in the minor kingdom of Kent, whose heathen ruler Ethelbert had married a Frankish Christian princess. London was in the Kingdom of Essex and out of reach of the missionaries at first. Therefore, in part perhaps to flatter Ethelbert, his capital was made the cathedral city. Related: Canterburian.
canticle (n.) Look up canticle at Dictionary.com
"short hymn," early 13c., from Latin canticulum "a little song," diminutive of canticum "song" (also a scene in Roman comedy enacted by one person and accompanied by music and dancing), from cantus (see chant (v.)).
cantilever (n.) Look up cantilever at Dictionary.com
1660s, probably from cant (n.2) + lever, but earliest form (c. 1610) was cantlapper. First element also might be Spanish can "dog," architect's term for an end of timber jutting out of a wall, on which beams rested. Related: Cantilevered.
cantina (n.) Look up cantina at Dictionary.com
"bar room, saloon," 1892, Texas and U.S. southwest dialect, from Spanish and Italian form of canteen.
cantle (n.) Look up cantle at Dictionary.com
early 14c., "a part, a portion," also "a section cut out of anything" (mid-15c.), from Old North French cantel "corner, piece" (Old French chantel, Modern French chanteau), from Medieval Latin cantellus, diminutive of cantus "corner" (see cant (n.2)).
canto (n.) Look up canto at Dictionary.com
1580s, from Italian canto "song," from Latin cantus "song" (see chant (v.)). As "a section of a long poem," used in Italian by Dante, in English first by Spenser.
canton (n.) Look up canton at Dictionary.com
1530s, "corner, angle," from Middle French canton "piece, portion of a country" (13c.), from Italian (Lombard dialect) cantone "region," especially in the mountains, augmentative of Latin canto "section of a country," literally "corner" (see cant (n.2)). Originally in English a term in heraldry and flag descriptions; applied to the sovereign states of the Swiss republic from 1610s. Related: Cantoned.
Cantonese (n.) Look up Cantonese at Dictionary.com
1816, from Canton, former transliteration of the name of the Chinese region now known in English as Guangzhou. The older form of the name is from the old British-run, Hong Kong-based Chinese postal system. As an adjective from 1840.
cantonment (n.) Look up cantonment at Dictionary.com
1756, "military quarters," from French cantonnement, from cantonner "to divide into cantons" (14c.), from canton (see canton). Meaning "action of quartering troops" is from 1757.
cantor (n.) Look up cantor at Dictionary.com
1530s, "church song-leader," from Latin cantor "singer, poet, actor," agent noun from past participle stem of canere "to sing" (see chant (v.)). Applied in English to the Hebrew chazan from 1893.
cantrip (n.) Look up cantrip at Dictionary.com
"magical spell," 1719, a Scottish word of uncertain origin; despite much speculation it is unclear even where the word is divided, whether the second element is rope (perhaps a reference to knotted cords as magical devices) or trappa "a step" or some other thing.
Canuck (n.) Look up Canuck at Dictionary.com
1835, perhaps a cross between Canada and Chinook, the native people in the Columbia River region. In U.S., often but not always derogatory. As an adjective from 1853.
canula Look up canula at Dictionary.com
variant of cannula.
canvas (n.) Look up canvas at Dictionary.com
"sturdy cloth made from hemp or flax," mid-14c., from Anglo-French canevaz, Old North French canevach, Old French chanevaz, literally "made of hemp, hempen," noun use of Vulgar Latin adjective *cannapaceus "made of hemp," from Latin cannabis, from Greek kannabis "hemp," a Scythian or Thracian word (see cannabis).

Latin adjectives in -aceus sometimes were made in Romanic languages into nouns of augmentative or pejorative force. Especially as a surface for oil paintings from c. 1700; hence "an oil painting" (1764).
canvas-back (n.) Look up canvas-back at Dictionary.com
also canvasback, 1785 as a type of North American duck. Earlier as an adjective for a type of garment made of expensive stuff in front and cheap canvas in the back (c. 1600); from canvas (n.) + back (n.).
canvass (v.) Look up canvass at Dictionary.com
c. 1500, from alternative spelling of canvas (n.) and probably meaning, originally, "to toss or sift in a canvas sheet," hence "to shake out, examine carefully" (1520s); "to solicit votes" (1550s). The spelling with a double -s- dates from 16c. Compare Old French canabasser "to examine carefully," literally "to sift through canvas." Related: Canvassed; canvassing. As a noun related to this, attested from c. 1600.
canyon (n.) Look up canyon at Dictionary.com
"narrow valley between cliffs," 1834, from Mexican Spanish cañon, extended sense of Spanish cañon "a pipe, tube; deep hollow, gorge," augmentative of cano "a tube," from Latin canna "reed" (see cane (n.)). But earlier spelling callon (1560s) might suggest a source in calle "street."