console (n.) Look up console at Dictionary.com
1706, "a cabinet; an ornamental base structure," from French console "a bracket" (16c.), which is of uncertain origin, possibly from Middle French consolateur, literally "one who consoles," word used for carved human figures supporting cornices, shelves or rails in choir stalls. Another guess connects it to Latin consolidare. Sense evolved to "body of a musical organ" (1881), "radio cabinet" (1925), then "cabinet for a TV, stereo, etc." (1944).
consolidate (v.) Look up consolidate at Dictionary.com
1510s, "to compact into one body," from Latin consolidatus, past participle of consolidare "to make solid," from com- "together" (see com-) + solidare "to make solid" (see solid). Meaning "to make firm or strong" is from mid-16c. Related: Consolidated; consolidating.
consolidated (adj.) Look up consolidated at Dictionary.com
past participle adjective from consolidate. Of money, debt, etc., from 1753; in literal sense of "made firm, unified," from c. 1850.
consolidation (n.) Look up consolidation at Dictionary.com
c. 1400, from Late Latin consolidationem (nominative consolidatio), noun of action from past participle stem of consolidare "to make firm, consolidate," from com "with, together" (see com-) + solidare "to make solid," from solidus (see solid).
consomme (n.) Look up consomme at Dictionary.com
1815, from French consommé, noun use of past participle of consommer "to consume" (12c.), from Latin consummare "to complete, finish, perfect" (see consummation). The French verb was influenced in sense by Latin consumere "to consume."
consonance (n.) Look up consonance at Dictionary.com
early 15c., "agreement among persons," from Old French consonance (12c.) "consonance, rhyme," from Latin consonantia "harmony, agreement," from consonantem (nominative consonans) (see consonant). Meaning "correspondence of sounds" is from 1580s.
consonant (adj.) Look up consonant at Dictionary.com
early 15c., from Old French consonant (13c.), from Latin consonantem (nominative consonans), present participle of consonare (see consonant (n.)).
consonant (n.) Look up consonant at Dictionary.com
early 14c., "sound other than a vowel," from Latin consonantem (nominative consonans), present participle of consonare "to sound together, sound aloud," from com "with, together" (see com-) + sonare "to sound, make a noise," "to sound," from PIE *swene-, from root *swen- "to sound" (see sound (n.1)). Consonants were thought of as sounds that are only produced together with vowels.
consort (v.) Look up consort at Dictionary.com
1580s, from consort (n.). Related: Consorted; consorting. Confused in form and sense with concert since 1580s.
consort (n.) Look up consort at Dictionary.com
early 15c., "partner," from Middle French consort "colleague, partner, wife" (14c., Old French consorte), from Latin consortem (nominative consors) "partner, comrade; wife, brother, sister," noun use of adjective meaning "having the same lot, of the same fortune," from com- "with" (see com-) + sors "a share, lot" (see sort (n.)). Sense of "husband or wife" ("partner in marriage") is 1630s in English.
consortia (n.) Look up consortia at Dictionary.com
plural of consortium.
consortium (n.) Look up consortium at Dictionary.com
1829, from Latin consortium "fellowship, participation, society," from consors (genitive consortis; see consort (n.)). Earlier, in British law, a term for "right of husband's access to his wife."
conspecific (adj.) Look up conspecific at Dictionary.com
1859, from conspecies (1837), from con- "with" + specific, here representing species (n.). From 1962 as a noun.
conspectus (n.) Look up conspectus at Dictionary.com
1836, from Latin conspectus "a looking at, sight, view; range or power of vision," from past participle of conspicere "to look at" (see conspicuous).
conspicuous (adj.) Look up conspicuous at Dictionary.com
1540s, from Latin conspicuus "visible, open to view, striking," from conspicere "to look at, observe, see, notice," from com-, intensive prefix (see com-), + specere "to look at" (from PIE root *spek- "to observe"). Phrase conspicuous by its absence (1859) is said to be from Tacitus ("Annals" iii.76), in a passage about certain images: "sed præfulgebant ... eo ipso quod effigies eorum non visebantur."
conspiracy (n.) Look up conspiracy at Dictionary.com
mid-14c., from Anglo-French conspiracie, Old French conspiracie "conspiracy, plot," from Latin conspirationem (nominative conspiratio) "agreement, union, unanimity," noun of action from conspirare (see conspire); earlier in same sense was conspiration (early 14c.), from French conspiration (13c.), from Latin conspirationem. An Old English word for it was facengecwis. As a term in law, from 1863. Conspiracy theory is from 1909.
conspirator (n.) Look up conspirator at Dictionary.com
c. 1400, conspyratour, from Old French conspirateur, from Latin conspiratorem (nominative conspiratorio), noun of action from conspirat-, past participle stem of conspirare (see conspire). Fem. form conspiratress is from mid-18c. Related: Conspiratorial; conspiratorially; conspiratory.
conspire (v.) Look up conspire at Dictionary.com
late 14c., from Old French conspirer (14c.), from Latin conspirare "to agree, unite, plot," literally "to breathe together," from com "with, together" (see com-) + spirare "to breathe" (see spirit (n.)). Or perhaps the notion is "to blow together" musical instruments, i.e., "To sound in unison." Related: Conspired; conspiring.
constable (n.) Look up constable at Dictionary.com
c. 1200, "chief household officer, justice of the peace," from Old French conestable (12c., Modern French connétable), "steward, governor," principal officer of the Frankish king's household, from Late Latin comes stabuli, literally "count of the stable" (established by Theodosian Code, c.438 C.E.), hence, "chief groom." See count (n.1).

Second element is from Latin stabulum "stable, standing place" (see stable (n.)). Probably a translation of a Germanic word. Meaning "an officer of the peace" is from c. 1600, transferred to "police officer" 1836. French reborrowed constable 19c. as "English police."
constabulary (n.) Look up constabulary at Dictionary.com
1630s, "district under a constable," from Medieval Latin constabularia, from constabulus, Latinized form of Old French conestable (see constable). Meaning "organized body of constables" is from 1837. Earlier (mid-15c.) as an adjective, "pertaining to a constable."
constance (n.) Look up constance at Dictionary.com
mid-14c., "steadfastness," from Old French constance "steadfastness, permanence" (14c.), from Latin constantia (source of Italian costanza, Spanish constancia), noun of action from constantem (see constant (adj.)). Obsolete since 17c. except as a given name for a girl, which enjoyed a mild popularity in U.S. c. 1945-1955.
constancy (n.) Look up constancy at Dictionary.com
1520s, from constance + -cy.
constant (n.) Look up constant at Dictionary.com
1832 in mathematics and physics, from constant (adj.).
constant (adj.) Look up constant at Dictionary.com
late 14c., "steadfast, resolute," from Old French constant (14c.) or directly from Latin constantem (nominative constans) "standing firm, stable, steadfast, faithful," present participle of constare, from com "with, together" (see com-) + stare "to stand," from PIE root *sta- "to stand, make or be firm." Of actions and conditions from 1650s. Related: Constantly.
Constantinople Look up Constantinople at Dictionary.com
from 330 C.E. to 1930 the name of what is now Istanbul and formerly was Byzantium, from Greek Konstantinou polis "Constantine's city," named for Roman emperor Flavius Valerius Aurelius Constantinus, whose name is derived from Latin constans (see constant (adj.)) + the common name-forming suffix -inus (see -ine (1)).
constellation (n.) Look up constellation at Dictionary.com
early 14c., constellacioun, "position of a planet in the zodiac;" late 14c., "one of the recognized star patterns handed down from antiquity" (in the zodiac or not), from Old French constellacion "constellation, conjuncture (of planets)," from Late Latin constellationem (nominative constellatio) "set with stars," from constellatus, from Latin com "with, together" (see com-) + past participle of stellare "to shine," from stella "star" (from PIE root *ster- (2) "star").

The oldest sense is astrological, of the position of planets ("stars") relative to the constellations on a given day, usually the day of one's birth, as a determiner of one's character. "I folwed ay myn inclinacioun/By vertu of my constillacioun" (Chaucer, "Wife's Prologue," c. 1386).

The classical northern constellations probably were formed in prehistoric Mesopotamia; the Greeks likely picked them up c. 500 B.C.E., and Claudius Ptolemy (c. 90-c. 168) of Alexandria codified 48 of them, all still current, in his "Almagest" (2c.). The canonical list was expanded from 16c. as Europeans explored southern regions whose stars were invisible from Alexandria and as astronomers filled in the dimmer regions between the established figures, so that by the late 19c. as many as 109 constellations were shown on maps. The modern roster was set at 88 by the International Astronomical Union in 1922.
consternate (v.) Look up consternate at Dictionary.com
1650s, from Latin consternatus, past participle of consternare "overcome, confuse, dismay, perplex, terrify, alarm," probably related to consternere "throw down, prostrate," from com-, intensive prefix (see com-), + sternere "to spread out, lay down, stretch out," from nasalized form of PIE root *stere- "to spread."
consternation (n.) Look up consternation at Dictionary.com
1610s, from French consternation "dismay, confusion," from Latin consternationem (nominative consternatio) "confusion, dismay," from consternat-, past participle stem of consternare "overcome, confuse, dismay, perplex, terrify, alarm," probably related to consternere "throw down, prostrate," from com-, intensive prefix (see com-), + sternere "to spread out, lay down, stretch out," from nasalized form of PIE root *stere- "to spread."
constipate (v.) Look up constipate at Dictionary.com
1530s, in part a back-formation from constipation, in part from Latin constipatus, past participle of constipare. An earlier verb in this sense was constipen (late 14c.). Related: Constipated; constipating.
constipation (n.) Look up constipation at Dictionary.com
c. 1400, "constriction of tissue," from Late Latin constipationem (nominative constipatio), noun of state from past participle stem of Latin constipare "to press or crowd together," from com- "together" (see com-) + stipare "to cram, pack" (see stiff (adj.)). Specifically of the bowel condition since 1540s.
constituency (n.) Look up constituency at Dictionary.com
"body of constituents," 1806, from constituent + -cy.
constituent (n.) Look up constituent at Dictionary.com
1620s, "one who appoints or elects a representative," from Latin constituentem (nominative constituens), present participle of constituere (see constitute). The notion is "to make up or compose" a body by appointing or electing a representative.
constituent (adj.) Look up constituent at Dictionary.com
"essential, characteristic," 1660s, from Latin constituentem (nominative constituens), present participle of constituere (see constitute). Meaning "that appoints or elects a representative to a body" is from 1714.
constitute (v.) Look up constitute at Dictionary.com
mid-15c., from Latin constitutus, past participle of constituere "to cause to stand, set up, fix, place, establish, set in order; form something new; resolve," of persons, "to appoint to an office," from com-, intensive prefix (see com-), + statuere "to set," from PIE root *sta- "to stand, make or be firm." Related: Constituted; constituting.
constitution (n.) Look up constitution at Dictionary.com
mid-14c., "law, regulation, edict," from Old French constitucion (12c.) "constitution, establishment," and directly from Latin constitutionem (nominative constitutio) "act of settling, settled condition, anything arranged or settled upon, regulation, order, ordinance," from constitut-, past participle stem of constituere (see constitute).

Meaning "action of establishing" is from 1580s; that of "way in which a thing is constituted" is from c. 1600; that of "physical health, strength and vigor of the body" is from 1550s; of the mind, "temperament, character" from 1580s. Sense of "mode of organization of a state" is from c. 1600; that of "system of principles by which a community is governed" dates from 1730s; especially of a document of written laws since the U.S. and French constitutions, late 18c.
constitutional (n.) Look up constitutional at Dictionary.com
"a constitutional walk," 1829, probably originally among university students, from constitutional (adj.) in the "beneficial to bodily health" sense.
constitutional (adj.) Look up constitutional at Dictionary.com
1680s, "pertaining to a person's (physical or mental) constitution," from constitution + -al (1). Meaning "beneficial to bodily constitution" is from 1750. Meaning "authorized or allowed by the political constitution" is from 1765. Constitutional monarchy is recorded from 1801, from French. Related: Constitutionally.
constitutionalism (n.) Look up constitutionalism at Dictionary.com
1832, "constitutional system of government;" occasionally also "constitutionality;" from constitutional (adj.) + -ism.
constitutionality (n.) Look up constitutionality at Dictionary.com
1787, "quality of being in accord with a constitution," from constitutional (adj.) + -ity.
constitutive (adj.) Look up constitutive at Dictionary.com
c. 1600, "having the power of establishing," also "elemental, essential," from Medieval Latin *constitutivus, from constitut-, past participle stem of constituere (see constitute). Related: Constitutively.
constrain (v.) Look up constrain at Dictionary.com
early 14c., constreyen, from stem of Old French constreindre (Modern French contraindre) "restrain, control," from Latin constringere "to bind together, tie tightly, fetter, shackle, chain," from com "with, together" (see com-) + stringere "to draw tight" (see strain (v.)). Related: Constrained; constraining.
constraint (n.) Look up constraint at Dictionary.com
late 14c., "distress, oppression," from Old French constreinte "binding, constraint, compulsion" (Modern French contrainte), fem. noun from constreint, past participle of constreindre, from Vulgar Latin *constrinctus, from Latin constrictus (see constrain). Meaning "coercion, compulsion" is from 1530s.
constrict (v.) Look up constrict at Dictionary.com
early 15c., from Latin constrictus, past participle of constringere "compress" (see constrain). A direct borrowing from Latin of the same word which, via French, became constrain. Related: Constricted; constricting.
constriction (n.) Look up constriction at Dictionary.com
c. 1400, from Latin constrictionem (nominative constrictio), noun of action from past participle stem of constringere "compress" (see constrain).
constrictive (adj.) Look up constrictive at Dictionary.com
c. 1400, from Late Latin constrictivus, from Latin constrictus, past participle of constringere "compress" (see constrain).
constrictor (n.) Look up constrictor at Dictionary.com
1735, agent noun in Latin form from constrict.
construct (n.) Look up construct at Dictionary.com
1871 in linguistics, 1890 in psychology, 1933 in the general sense of "anything constructed;" from construct (v.), with altered pronunciation to distinguish noun from verb (as with produce, detail, etc.).
construct (v.) Look up construct at Dictionary.com
early 15c., from Latin constructus, past participle of construere "pile up together, accumulate; build, make, erect," from com "with, together" (see com-) + struere "to pile up" (from PIE *streu-, extended form of root *stere- "to spread"). Related: Constructed; constructing.
construction (n.) Look up construction at Dictionary.com
late 14c., from Old French construction or directly from Latin constructionem (nominative constructio), from construct-, past participle stem of construere "pile up together, accumulate; build, make, erect," from com "with, together" (see com-) + struere "to pile up" (from PIE *streu-, extended form of root *stere- "to spread").
constructionist (n.) Look up constructionist at Dictionary.com
1844, in reference to the U.S. Constitution, from construction + -ist. Usually with strict or loose.