copulation (n.) Look up copulation at Dictionary.com
late 14c., "coupling," from Middle French copulation "mating, copulation" (14c.), from Latin copulationem (nominative copulatio), noun of action from past participle stem of copulare (see copulate). Of the sex act from late 15c., and this became the main sense from 16c.
copy (n.) Look up copy at Dictionary.com
early 14c., "written account or record," from Old French copie (13c.), from Medieval Latin copia "reproduction, transcript," from Latin copia "plenty, means" (see copious). Sense extended 15c. to any specimen of writing (especially MS for a printer) and any reproduction or imitation. Related: Copyist.
copy (v.) Look up copy at Dictionary.com
late 14c., from Old French copier (14c.), from Medieval Latin copiare "to transcribe," originally "to write in plenty," from Latin copia (see copy (n.)). Hence, "to write an original text many times." Related: Copied; copying. Figurative sense of "to imitate" is attested from 1640s.
copycat (n.) Look up copycat at Dictionary.com
by 1884, American English, probably at least a generation older, from copy (v.) + cat (n.). As a verb, from 1932.
copyright (n.) Look up copyright at Dictionary.com
"the right to make or sell copies," 1735, from copy + right (n.). As a verb, from 1806 (implied in past participle adjective copyrighted).
copywriter Look up copywriter at Dictionary.com
"writer of copy for advertisements," 1911, from copy + writer. Related: Copywriting.
coquet (n.) Look up coquet at Dictionary.com
"amorous, flirtatious person," 1690s, originally of both sexes (as it was in French), from French coquet (17c.), diminutive of coq "cock" (see cock (n.1)). A figurative reference to its strut or its lust. The distinction of fem. coquette began c.1700, and use in reference to males has faded out since.
coquetry (n.) Look up coquetry at Dictionary.com
1650s, from French coquetterie, from coqueter (v.), from coquet (see coquet).
Coquetry whets the appetite; flirtation depraves it .... [Donald Grant Mitchell (1822-1908)]
coquette (n.) Look up coquette at Dictionary.com
1660s, from French fem. of coquet (male) "flirt" (see coquet).
Cora Look up Cora at Dictionary.com
fem. proper name, from Latin, from Greek Kore (see Kore).
coracle (n.) Look up coracle at Dictionary.com
"round boat of wicker, coated with skins," 1540s (the thing is described, but not named, in the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle from 9c.), from Welsh corwgl, from corwg, cognate with Gaelic curachan, Middle Irish curach "boat," which probably is the source of Middle English currock "coracle" (mid-15c.). The name is perhaps from the hides that cover it (see corium).
coral (n.) Look up coral at Dictionary.com
c.1300, from Old French coral (12c., Modern French corail), from Latin corallium, from Greek korallion; perhaps of Semitic origin (compare Hebrew goral "small pebble," Arabic garal "small stone"), originally just the red variety found in the Mediterranean, hence use of the word as a symbol of "red." Related: Coralline. Coral snake (1760) is so called for the red zones in its markings. Coral reef is attested from 1745.
corbel (n.) Look up corbel at Dictionary.com
mid-14c., from Old French corbel, diminutive of corb "raven," from Latin corvus (see raven); so called from its beaked shape.
cord (n.) Look up cord at Dictionary.com
c.1300, from Old French corde "rope, string, twist, cord," from Latin chorda "string of a musical instrument, cat-gut," from Greek khorde "string, catgut, chord, cord," from PIE root *ghere- "intestine" (see yarn). As a measure of wood (eight feet long, four feet high and wide) first recorded 1610s, so called because it was measured with a cord of rope.
cordage (n.) Look up cordage at Dictionary.com
"ropes, especially on a ship," late 15c., from Old French cordage, from corde "cord" (see cord).
cordial (adj.) Look up cordial at Dictionary.com
late 14c., "of the heart," from Middle French cordial, from Medieval Latin cordialis "of or for the heart," from Latin cor (genitive cordis) "heart" (see heart). Meaning "heartfelt, from the heart" is mid-15c. The noun is late 14c., originally "medicine, food, or drink that stimulates the heart." Related: Cordiality.
cordially (adv.) Look up cordially at Dictionary.com
late 15c., "by heart," from cordial + -ly (2). Meaning "heartily" is from 1530s; weakened sense of "with friendliness" is attested by 1781.
cordillera (n.) Look up cordillera at Dictionary.com
1704, from Spanish, "mountain chain," from cordilla, in Old Spanish "string, rope," diminutive of cuerda, from Latin chorda "cord, rope" (see cord).
cordite (n.) Look up cordite at Dictionary.com
smokeless explosive, 1889, from cord + -ite (2); so called for its "curiously string-like appearance" in the words of a newspaper of the day.
cordon (n.) Look up cordon at Dictionary.com
mid-15c., "cord or ribbon worn as an ornament," from Middle French cordon "ribbon," diminutive of Old French corde "cord" (see cord). Sense of "a line of people or things guarding something" is 1758. Original sense preserved in cordon bleu (1727) "the highest distinction," literally "blue ribbon," for the sky-blue ribbon worn by the Knights-grand-cross of the Holy Ghost (highest order of chivalry); extended figuratively to other persons of distinction, especially, jocularly, to a first-rate cook. Cordon sanitaire (1857), from French, a guarded line between infected and uninfected districts.
cordon (v.) Look up cordon at Dictionary.com
1560s, "to ornament with a ribbon;" 1891 as "to guard with a cordon;" from cordon (n.). Related: Cordoned; cordoning.
cordovan (n.) Look up cordovan at Dictionary.com
1590s, "fine Spanish leather," from adjective Cordovan, from Spanish cordovan (modern cordoban), from cordovano (adj.) "of Cordova," the Spanish city, former capital of Moorish Spain; a later adoption of the same word that became cordwain (see cordwainer). The city name is from Phoenician qorteb "oil press."
corduroy (n.) Look up corduroy at Dictionary.com
1780, probably from cord + obsolete 17c. duroy, name of a coarse fabric made in England, of unknown origin. Folk etymology is from *corde du roi "the king's cord," but this is not attested in French, where the term for the cloth was velours à côtes. Applied in U.S. to a road of logs across swampy ground (1780s) on similarity of appearance.
CORDUROY ROAD. A road or causeway constructed with logs laid together over swamps or marshy places. When properly finished earth is thrown between them by which the road is made smooth; but in newly settled parts of the United States they are often left uncovered, and hence are extremely rough and bad to pass over with a carriage. Sometimes they extend many miles. They derive their name from their resemblance to a species of ribbed velvet, called corduroy. [Bartlett]
cordwainer (n.) Look up cordwainer at Dictionary.com
"shoemaker, leatherworker," c.1100, from Anglo-French cordewaner, from Old French cordoan "(leather) of Cordova," the town in Spain whose leather was favored by the upper class for shoes. Compare cordovan, a later borrowing directly from Spanish.
core (n.) Look up core at Dictionary.com
late 14c., probably from Old French coeur "core of fruit, heart of lettuce," literally "heart," from Latin cor "heart," from PIE root *kerd- "heart" (see heart). Nuclear reactor sense is from 1949.
core (v.) Look up core at Dictionary.com
mid-15c., from core (n.). Related: Cored; coring.
corgi (n.) Look up corgi at Dictionary.com
1926, from Welsh corgi, from cor "dwarf" + ci "dog" (see canine).
coriander (n.) Look up coriander at Dictionary.com
late 14c., from Old French coriandre (14c.), from Latin coriandrum, from Greek koriannon, apparently a non-Indo-European word.
Corinna Look up Corinna at Dictionary.com
fem. proper name, from Latin Corinna, from Greek Korinna, diminutive of kore "maiden," also an epithet of Persephone; see Kore.
Corinth Look up Corinth at Dictionary.com
city in Greece, from Latin Corinthus, from Greek Korinthos, from Pelasgian *kar- "point, peak." The -nthos identifies it as being from the lost pre-IE language of Greece.
Corinthian Look up Corinthian at Dictionary.com
1650s as an architectural order, from Corinth, the ancient Greek city-state. In classical times Corinth was notorious for its luxury and licentiousness among the Greek states (and for not scorning trade and profit); hence Corinthian, noun and adjective, in various slang or colloquial sense in English, especially "a swell, a man about town" (early to mid-19c. but especially in the 1820s).
Coriolis effect (n.) Look up Coriolis effect at Dictionary.com
1969 (earlier Coriolis force, 1923, and other references back to 1912), from the name of French scientist Gaspard Gustave de Coriolis (1792-1843) who described it c.1835.
corium (n.) Look up corium at Dictionary.com
1650s, from Latin corium "skin, hide, leather," related to cortex "bark," scortum "skin, hide," from PIE root *(s)ker- (1) "to cut" (cognates: Sanskrit krtih "hide;" Old Church Slavonic scora "skin," Russian skora "hide," kora "bark;" Welsh corwg "boat made with leather skins;" Old English sceran "to cut, shear;" see shear (v.)). Related: Coriaceous.
cork (n.) Look up cork at Dictionary.com
c.1300, from Spanish alcorque "cork sole," probably via Arabic and ultimately from Latin quercus "oak" (see Quercus) or cortex (genitive corticis) "bark" (see corium).
Cork Look up Cork at Dictionary.com
place in Ireland, anglicized from Irish Corcaigh, from corcach "marsh."
cork (v.) Look up cork at Dictionary.com
1570s, "to put a cork sole on a shoe," from cork (n.)). Meaning "to stop with a cork" is from 1640s. Related: Corked; corking.
corker (n.) Look up corker at Dictionary.com
1837, slang, something that "settles" a debate, discussion, conflict, etc.; hence "something astonishing" (1880s). Probably an agent noun from cork (v.) on the notion is of putting a cork in a bottle as an act of finality.
corkscrew (n.) Look up corkscrew at Dictionary.com
1720, from cork (n.) + screw (n.). Given various figurative or extended senses from c.1815; the verb is attested from 1837.
corky (adj.) Look up corky at Dictionary.com
early 17c., "light, buoyant" (as cork is), hence, figuratively, of persons "lively;" from cork (n.) + -y (2). Of bottled liquors or wine, "having a flavor of cork," from 1889.
corm (n.) Look up corm at Dictionary.com
1570s, from French corme, from Latin cornum "cornel-cherry" (but applied to service-berries in French); see cornel.
cormorant (n.) Look up cormorant at Dictionary.com
early 14c., from Old French cormarenc (12c., Modern French cormoran), from Late Latin corvus marinus "sea raven" + Germanic suffix -enc, -ing. The -t in English probably is from confusion with words in -ant. It has a reputation for voracity.
corn (n.1) Look up corn at Dictionary.com
"grain," Old English corn, from Proto-Germanic *kurnam "small seed" (cognates: Old Frisian and Old Saxon korn "grain," Middle Dutch coren, German Korn, Old Norse korn, Gothic kaurn), from PIE root *gre-no- "grain" (cognates: Old Church Slavonic zruno "grain," Latin granum "seed," Lithuanian žirnis "pea"). The sense of the Old English word was "grain with the seed still in" (as in barleycorn) rather than a particular plant.

Locally understood to denote the leading crop of a district. Restricted to the indigenous "maize" in America (c.1600, originally Indian corn, but the adjective was dropped), usually wheat in England, oats in Scotland and Ireland, while Korn means "rye" in parts of Germany. Maize was introduced to China by 1550, it thrived where rice did not grow well and was a significant factor in the 18th century population boom there. Cornflakes first recorded 1907. Corned beef so called for the "corns" or grains of salt with which it is preserved; from verb corn "to salt" (1560s).
corn (n.2) Look up corn at Dictionary.com
"hardening of skin," early 15c., from Old French corne (13c.) "horn (of an animal)," later, "corn on the foot," from Latin cornu "horn" (see horn (n.)).
corn row (n.) Look up corn row at Dictionary.com
also cornrow, 1769 as "a row of corn," by 1971 as a style of hair braids. The verb in this sense also is from 1971.
cornea (n.) Look up cornea at Dictionary.com
late 14c., from Medieval Latin cornea tela "horny web or sheath," from Latin cornu (genitive cornus) "horn" (see horn (n.)). So called for its consistency. Related: Corneal.
cornel (n.) Look up cornel at Dictionary.com
a type of tree or shrub with an edible fruit, 1550s, from German cornel-baum, from Old High German cornul, from Medieval Latin cornolium, from French cornouille, from Vulgar Latin *cornuculum, from Latin cornum "cornel-cherry," perhaps related to Greek kerasos "cherry." Old English also had borrowed the Latin word, in corntreow. The plant was noted for its hard wood, which was favored by the ancients for making shafts of spears and arrows.
cornelian (n.) Look up cornelian at Dictionary.com
"red variety of chalcedony," a variant of corneline (c.1400), from Old French corneline (Modern French cornaline), diminutive of corneola, probably from Vulgar Latin *cornea, from Latin cornus, name of a type of berry (see cornel).
Cornelius Look up Cornelius at Dictionary.com
masc. proper name, from the name of a Roman gens.
corner (n.) Look up corner at Dictionary.com
late 13c., from Anglo-French cornere (Old French corniere), from Old French corne "horn, corner," from Vulgar Latin *corna, from Latin cornua, plural of cornu "projecting point, end, horn" (see horn (n.)). Replaced Old English hyrne. As an adjective, from 1530s.
corner (v.) Look up corner at Dictionary.com
late 14c., "to furnish with corners," from corner (n.). Meaning "to turn a corner," as in a race, is 1860s; meaning "drive (someone) into a corner" is American English from 1824. Commercial sense is from 1836. Related: Cornered; cornering.