dollar (n.) Look up dollar at Dictionary.com
1550s, from Low German daler, from German taler (1530s, later thaler), abbreviation of Joachimstaler, literally "(gulden) of Joachimstal," coin minted 1519 from silver from mine opened 1516 near Joachimstal, town in Erzgebirge Mountains in northwest Bohemia. German Tal is cognate with English dale.

The thaler was a large silver coin of varying value in the German states (and a unit of the German monetary union of 1857-73 equal to three marks); it also served as a currency unit in Denmark and Sweden. English colonists in America used the word in reference to Spanish pieces of eight. Continental Congress July 6, 1785, adopted dollar when it set up U.S. currency, on suggestion of Gouverneur Morris and Thomas Jefferson, because the term was widely known but not British. But none were circulated until 1794.
When William M. Evarts was Secretary of State he accompanied Lord Coleridge on an excursion to Mount Vernon. Coleridge remarked that he had heard it said that Washington, standing on the lawn, could throw a dollar clear across the Potomac. Mr. Evarts explained that a dollar would go further in those days than now. [Walsh]
Phrase dollars to doughnuts attested from 1890; dollar diplomacy is from 1910. The dollar sign ($) is said to derive from the image of the Pillars of Hercules, stamped with a scroll, on the Spanish piece of eight. However, according to the Bureau of Engraving and Printing of the U.S. Department of the Treasury:
[T]he most widely accepted explanation is that the symbol is the result of evolution, independently in different places, of the Mexican or Spanish "P's" for pesos, or piastres, or pieces of eight. The theory, derived from a study of old manuscripts, is that the "S" gradually came to be written over the "P," developing a close equivalent of the "$" mark. It was widely used before the adoption of the United States dollar in 1785.
dollhouse (n.) Look up dollhouse at Dictionary.com
1855, from doll (n.) + house (n.). Doll's house first recorded 1783.
dollop (n.) Look up dollop at Dictionary.com
1570s, from East Anglian dialectal dallop "patch, tuft or clump of grass," of uncertain origin. Modern sense of "a lump or glob" is 1812. As a verb, from 1825.
dolly (n.) Look up dolly at Dictionary.com
c.1600, Dolly, a fem. nickname (see doll); 1790 as "child's doll;" applied from 1792 to any contrivance fancied to resemble a dolly in some sense, especially "a small platform on rollers" (1901). Doesn't look like one to me, either, but that's what they say.
dolmen (n.) Look up dolmen at Dictionary.com
1859, from French dolmin applied 1796 by French general and antiquarian Théophile Malo Corret de La Tour d'Auvergne (1743-1800), perhaps from Cornish tolmen "enormous stone slab set up on supporting points," such that a man may walk under it, literally "hole of stone," from Celtic men "stone."

Some suggest the first element may be Breton taol "table," a loan-word from Latin tabula "board, plank," but the Breton form of this compound would be taolvean. "There is reason to think that this [tolmen] is the word inexactly reproduced by Latour d'Auvergne as dolmin, and misapplied by him and succeeding French archaeologists to the cromlech" [OED]. See cromlech, which is properly an upright flat stone, often arranged as one of a circle.
dolomite (n.) Look up dolomite at Dictionary.com
1794, named for French geologist Déodat De Gratet De Dolomieu (1750-1801) who described the rock in his study of the Alps (1791).
Dolores Look up Dolores at Dictionary.com
fem. proper name, from Spanish Maria de los Dolores, literally "Mary of the Sorrows," from plural of dolor, from Latin dolor "pain, sorrow."
dolorous (adj.) Look up dolorous at Dictionary.com
c.1400, "causing pain," from Old French doloros (12c., Modern French douloureux) "painful, sorrowful, wretched," from Late Latin dolorosus "painful, sorrowful," from Latin dolor "pain, grief." Sense of "causing grief" is from mid-15c.; that of "full of sorrow" is from 1510s. Related: Dolorously; dolorousness.
dolphin (n.) Look up dolphin at Dictionary.com
mid-14c., from Old French daulphin, from Medieval Latin dolfinus, from Latin delphinus "dolphin," from Greek delphis (genitive delphinos) "dolphin," related to delphys "womb," perhaps via notion of the animal bearing live young, or from its shape, from PIE *gwelbh-. Popularly applied to the dorado from late 16c.
dolt (n.) Look up dolt at Dictionary.com
1540s, perhaps a variant of dold "dull, foolish," influenced by dulte, dolte, past participle forms of Middle English dullen "to dull, make or become dazed or stupid" (see dull (adj.)). Related: Doltish; doltishly; doltishness.
Dom Perignon Look up Dom Perignon at Dictionary.com
trademark name, 1954 (in use from 1936), from monk of that name (1638-1715), blind cellarmaster of the monastery of Hautvilliers near Epernay, France, who was said to have discovered the advantage of corked bottles in fermentation. Dom was a title of authority, from Latin dominus "lord, master" (see domain).
domain (n.) Look up domain at Dictionary.com
early 15c., in Scottish, from Middle French domaine "domain, estate," from Old French demaine "lord's estate," from Latin dominium "property, dominion," from dominus "lord, master, owner," from domus "house" (see domestic). Form influenced in Old French by Medieval Latin domanium "domain, estate." Internet domain name attested by 1985.
dome (n.) Look up dome at Dictionary.com
"round, vaulted roof," 1650s, from French dome (16c.), from Provençal doma, from Greek doma "house, housetop" (especially a style of roof from the east), related to domos "house" (see domestic).

In the Middle Ages, German dom and Italian duomo were used for "cathedral" (on the notion of "God's house"), so English began to use this word in the sense "cupola," an architectural feature characteristic of Italian cathedrals. Used in U.S. also with reference to round summits of mountains.
Domesday book Look up Domesday book at Dictionary.com
1178, popular name of Great Inquisition or Survey (1086), William the Conqueror's inventory of his new domain, from Middle English domes, genitive of dom "day of judgment" (see doom). "The booke ... to be called Domesday, bicause (as Mathew Parise saith) it spared no man, but iudged all men indifferently." [William Lambarde, "A Perambulation of Kent," 1570]
domestic (adj.) Look up domestic at Dictionary.com
early 15c., from Middle French domestique (14c.) and directly from Latin domesticus "belonging to the household," from domus "house," from PIE *dom-o- "house," from root *dem- "house, household" (cognates: Sanskrit damah "house;" Avestan demana- "house;" Greek domos "house," despotes "master, lord;" Latin dominus "master of a household;" Old Church Slavonic domu, Russian dom "house;" Lithuanian dimstis "enclosed court, property;" Old Norse topt "homestead").

It represents the usual Indo-European word for "house" (Italian, Spanish casa are from Latin casa "cottage, hut;" Germanic *hus is of obscure origin). The noun meaning "household servant" is 1530s (a sense also found in Old French domestique). Domestics, originally "articles of home manufacture," is attested from 1620s. Related: Domestically. Domestic violence is attested from 19c. as "revolution and insurrection;" 1977 as "spouse abuse, violence in the home."
domesticate (v.) Look up domesticate at Dictionary.com
1630s, of animals; 1741, of persons, "to cause to be attached to home and family;" from Medieval Latin domesticatus, past participle of domesticare "to tame," literally "to dwell in a house," from domesticus (see domestic). Related: Domesticated; domesticating.
domestication (n.) Look up domestication at Dictionary.com
1774; see domestic + -ation.
domesticity (n.) Look up domesticity at Dictionary.com
1721; see domestic + -ity.
domicile (n.) Look up domicile at Dictionary.com
mid-15c., from Middle French domicile (14c.), from Latin domicilium, perhaps from domus "house" (see domestic) + colere "to dwell" (see colony). As a verb, it is first attested 1809. Related: Domiciled; domiciliary.
dominance (n.) Look up dominance at Dictionary.com
1819; see dominant + -ance. Related: Dominancy.
dominant (adj.) Look up dominant at Dictionary.com
mid-15c., from Middle French dominant (13c.), from Latin dominantem (nominative dominans), present participle of dominari (see domination). Music sense is from 1819. Sexual bondage sense by c.1960. The noun is first recorded 1819, earliest in the musical sense.
dominate (v.) Look up dominate at Dictionary.com
1610s, from Latin dominatus, past participle of dominari "to rule, dominate, to govern," from dominus (see domain). Related: Dominated; dominating. Or perhaps a back-formation from domination.
domination (n.) Look up domination at Dictionary.com
late 14c., "rule, control," from Old French dominacion (12c.) "domination, rule, power," from Latin dominationem (nominative dominatio), noun of action from past participle stem of dominari "to rule, have dominion over," from dominus "lord, master," literally "master of the house," from domus "home" (see domestic) + -nus, suffix denoting ownership or relation. Sexual sense by 1961.
dominatrix (n.) Look up dominatrix at Dictionary.com
"dominant female entity," attested since 1560s, though not in quite the usual modern sense ("Rome ... dominatrix of nations" [1561]). See domination + -trix. Modern BDSM sense attested by 1976.
domineer (v.) Look up domineer at Dictionary.com
1580s, from Dutch domineren "to rule" (16c.), from Middle French dominer, from Latin dominari "to rule, 'lord' it over" (see domination). Shakespeare's usage is not the earliest in English. Related: Domineering.
Dominic Look up Dominic at Dictionary.com
masc. proper name, from Latin dominicus "pertaining to a lord" (see demesne).
Dominican (1) Look up Dominican at Dictionary.com
"Black friar," 1630s, from Latin form of the name of Domingo de Guzman (Santo Domingo), founder of the order of preaching friars. His name, like Italian form Dominic, is from Latin dominicus "pertaining to a lord."
Dominican (2) Look up Dominican at Dictionary.com
"native or inhabitant of the Dominican Republic," 1853, from the Caribbean island of Dominica, home of the nation, so named 1493, from Latin (dies) dominica "Sunday," the day of the week on which the island was discovered.
dominion (n.) Look up dominion at Dictionary.com
early 15c., from Old French dominion "dominion, rule, power," from Medieval Latin dominionem (nominative dominio), corresponding to Latin dominium "property, ownership," from dominus (see domination).

British sovereign colonies often were called dominions, hence the Dominion of Canada, the formal title after the 1867 union, and Old Dominion, the popular name for the U.S. state of Virginia, first recorded 1778.
domino (n.) Look up domino at Dictionary.com
1801, from French domino (1771), perhaps (on comparison of the black tiles of the game) from the meaning "hood with a cloak worn by canons or priests" (1690s), from Latin dominus "lord, master" (see domain), but the connection is not clear. Klein thinks it might be directly from dominus, "because he who has first disposed his pieces becomes 'the master.' " Metaphoric use in geopolitics is from April 1954, first used by U.S. President Eisenhower in a "New York Times" piece, in reference to what happens when you set up a row of dominos and knock the first one down.
domino theory Look up domino theory at Dictionary.com
in geo-politics, by 1963; see domino. Eisenhower's original phrase was domino principle (1954).
dominoes (n.) Look up dominoes at Dictionary.com
the usual form when referring to the game played with dominoes, c.1800; see domino.
don (n.) Look up don at Dictionary.com
1520s, from Spanish or Portuguese don, title of respect, from Latin dominus "lord, master." The university sense is c.1660, originally student slang; underworld sense is 1952, from Italian don, from Late Latin domnus, from Latin dominus (see domain). The fem. form is Dona (Spanish/Portuguese), Donna (Italian).
don (v.) Look up don at Dictionary.com
early 14c. contraction of do on (see doff). "After 1650 retained in popular use only in north. dialect; as a literary archaism it has become very frequent in 19th c." [OED]. Related: Donned; donning.
don juan (n.) Look up don juan at Dictionary.com
"philanderer," from the legendary dissolute Spanish nobleman whose rakish exploits formed the stuff of popular tales in Spain from early 17c., dramatized by Gabriel Tellez in "Convivado de Piedra." Adapted into French and Italian before 1700; Used attributively in English for "ladies' man, womanizer" from the time of Byron's popular poem about him (1819).
don't Look up don't at Dictionary.com
contraction of do not, recorded from 1630s.
Donald Look up Donald at Dictionary.com
surname, from 13c. Scottish Dofnald, Dufenald, probably from Gaelic Domhnall, Old Irish Domnall (pronounced "Dovnall"), from Proto-Celtic *Dubno-valos "world-mighty, ruler of the world," from *walos "ruler" + PIE *dheub- (see deep (adj.)).
donate (v.) Look up donate at Dictionary.com
1819, back-formation from donation. Related: Donated; donating.
donation (n.) Look up donation at Dictionary.com
early 15c., from Old French donacion (13c.), from Latin donationem (nominative donatio) "a presenting, giving," noun of action from past participle stem of donare "give as a gift," from donum "gift," from PIE *donum "gift" (cognates: Sanskrit danam "offering, present," Old Church Slavonic dani "tribute," Lithuanian duonis "gift," Old Irish dan "gift, endowment, talent," Welsh dawn "gift"), from root *do- "to give" (see date (n.1)).
Donatist (n.) Look up Donatist at Dictionary.com
mid-15c., adherent of a Christian sect in 4c. North Africa, from Medieval Latin Donatista, from Donatus name of two of the principal men in it. The schism had more to do with episcopal succession in Carthage than with doctrine. The name is literally "bestowed, given."
donative (adj.) Look up donative at Dictionary.com
1550s, from Latin donativus, from donare (see donation). As a noun, from early 15c.
done Look up done at Dictionary.com
past participle of do (v.); from Old English past participle gedon (a vestige of the prefix is in ado). U.S. Southern use of done in phrases like "he done gone to the store" is attested from 1827, according to OED: "a perfective auxiliary or with adverbial force in the sense 'already; completely.' " Meaning "finished" is early 15c. Slang done for "doomed" is from 1842.
donee (n.) Look up donee at Dictionary.com
1520s; see donor + -ee.
Donegal Look up Donegal at Dictionary.com
county in northern Ireland, from Irish Dun na nGall "fort of the foreigners" (in this case, the Danes); also see Galloway.
dong (n.) Look up dong at Dictionary.com
"penis," 1891, of unknown origin.
donkey (n.) Look up donkey at Dictionary.com
1785, originally slang, perhaps a diminutive from dun "dull gray-brown," the form perhaps influenced by monkey. Or possibly from a familiar form of Duncan (compare dobbin). The older English word was ass (n.1).
Donna Look up Donna at Dictionary.com
fem. proper name, from Italian, literally "lady," from Latin domina (see dame).
donnish (adj.) Look up donnish at Dictionary.com
1835, from don (n.) in the university sense + -ish. Related: Donnishness.
donnybrook (n.) Look up donnybrook at Dictionary.com
1852, from Donnybrook Fair, proverbial for carousing and brawling, held in County Dublin until 1855.
donor (n.) Look up donor at Dictionary.com
mid-15c., from Anglo-French donour, Old French doneur (Modern French donneur), from Latin donatorem (nominative donator) "giver, donor," agent noun from past participle stem of donare "give as a gift" (see donation). Of blood, from 1910; of organs or tissues, from 1918.