ethnocentric (adj.) Look up ethnocentric at Dictionary.com
1900, from ethno- + -centric; a technical term in social sciences until it began to be more widely used in the second half of the 20th century. Related: Ethnocentricity; ethnocentrism.
ethnography (n.) Look up ethnography at Dictionary.com
1834, perhaps from German Ethnographie; see ethno- + -graphy "the study of." Related: Ethnographer; ethnographic.
ethnology (n.) Look up ethnology at Dictionary.com
1842, from ethno- + -logy. Related: Ethnologist.
ethology (n.) Look up ethology at Dictionary.com
late 17c., "mimicry," from Latin ethologia, from Greek ethologia, from ethos "character" (see ethos). As a branch of zoology, from 1897.
ethos (n.) Look up ethos at Dictionary.com
revived by Palgrave in 1851 from Greek ethos "moral character, nature, disposition, habit, custom," from suffixed form of PIE root *s(w)e- (see idiom). An important concept in Aristotle (as in "Rhetoric" II xii-xiv).
ethyl (n.) Look up ethyl at Dictionary.com
1838, from German ethyl (Liebig, 1834), from ether + -yl. Ethyl alcohol, under other names, was widely used in medicine by 13c.
ethylene (n.) Look up ethylene at Dictionary.com
1852, from ethyl + -ene, probably suggested by methylene.
etic (adj.) Look up etic at Dictionary.com
1954, coined by U.S. linguist K.L. Pike (1912-2000) from ending of phonetic.
etiolate (v.) Look up etiolate at Dictionary.com
of plants, "grown in darkness," 1791, from French étiolé, past participle of étioler "to blanch" (17c.), perhaps literally "to become like straw," from Norman dialect étule "a stalk," Old French esteule "straw, field of stubble," from Latin stipula "straw" (see stipule). Related: Etiolated.
etiology (n.) Look up etiology at Dictionary.com
"science of causes or causation," 1550s, from Late Latin aetiologia, from Greek aitiologia "statement of cause," from aitia "cause" + -logia "a speaking" (see -logy). Related: Etiologic; etiological.
etiquette (n.) Look up etiquette at Dictionary.com
1750, from French étiquette "prescribed behavior," from Old French estiquette "label, ticket" (see ticket).

The sense development in French perhaps is from small cards written or printed with instructions for how to behave properly at court (compare Italian etichetta, Spanish etiqueta), and/or from behavior instructions written on a soldier's billet for lodgings (the main sense of the Old French word).
Etna Look up Etna at Dictionary.com
volcano in Sicily, from Latin Aetna, from an indigenous Sicilian language, *aith-na "the fiery one," from PIE *ai-dh-, from root *ai- "to burn" (see edifice).
Eton Look up Eton at Dictionary.com
collar (1887), jacket (1881, formerly worn by the younger boys there), etc., from Eton College, public school for boys on the Thames opposite Windsor, founded by Henry VI. The place name is Old English ea "river" (see ea) + tun "farm, settlement."
Etruscan (n.) Look up Etruscan at Dictionary.com
1706, from Latin Etruscus "an Etruscan," from Etruria, ancient name of Tuscany, of uncertain origin, but containing an element that might mean "water" (see Basque) and which could be a reference to the rivers in the region.
Etta Look up Etta at Dictionary.com
fem. proper name, originally a shortening of Henrietta.
ettin (n.) Look up ettin at Dictionary.com
an old word for "a giant," extinct since 16c., from Old English eoten "giant, monster," from Proto-Germanic *itunoz "giant" (cognates: Old Norse iotunn, Danish jætte).
etude (n.) Look up etude at Dictionary.com
1837, from French étude, literally "study," from Old French estudie (12c.), from Latin studium (see study (n.)). Popularized in English by the etudes of Chopin (1810-1849).
etui (n.) Look up etui at Dictionary.com
1610s, from French étui, Old French estui (12c.) "case, box, container," back-formation from estuier "put in put aside, spare; to keep, shut up, imprison," of uncertain origin.
etymological (adj.) Look up etymological at Dictionary.com
1590s; see etymology + -ical. Related: Etymologically.
etymologicon (n.) Look up etymologicon at Dictionary.com
"a work in which etymologies are traced," 1640s, from Latin etymologicon, from Greek etymologikon, neuter of etymologikos (see etymology).
etymologist (n.) Look up etymologist at Dictionary.com
1630s; see etymology + -ist. Also etymologer (1640s).
etymologize (v.) Look up etymologize at Dictionary.com
1530s; see etymology + -ize. Related: Etymologized; etymologizing.
etymology (n.) Look up etymology at Dictionary.com
late 14c., ethimolegia "facts of the origin and development of a word," from Old French et(h)imologie (14c., Modern French étymologie), from Latin etymologia, from Greek etymologia, properly "study of the true sense (of a word)," from etymon "true sense" (neuter of etymos "true, real, actual," related to eteos "true") + -logia "study of, a speaking of" (see -logy). Latinized by Cicero as veriloquium.

In classical times, of meanings; later, of histories. Classical etymologists, Christian and pagan, based their explanations on allegory and guesswork, lacking historical records as well as the scientific method to analyze them, and the discipline fell into disrepute that lasted a millennium. Flaubert ["Dictionary of Received Ideas"] perhaps had them in mind when he wrote that the general view was that etymology was "the easiest thing in the world with the help of Latin and a little ingenuity." As a modern branch of linguistic science, from 1640s. Related: Etymological; etymologically.
etymon (n.) Look up etymon at Dictionary.com
"primitive word," 1570s, from Greek etymon, neuter of etymos "true, real, actual," related to eteos "true," which is perhaps cognate with Sanskrit satyah, Gothic sunjis, Old English soð "true."
eu- Look up eu- at Dictionary.com
word-forming element in modern use meaning "good, well," from comb. form of Greek eus "good," eu "well" (adv.), also "luckily, happily," from PIE *(e)su- "good" (cognates: Sanskrit su- "good," Avestan hu- "good").
eubacteria (n.) Look up eubacteria at Dictionary.com
coined in German 1930; see eu- + bacteria.
eucalyptus (n.) Look up eucalyptus at Dictionary.com
1809, from Modern Latin, coined 1788 by French botanist Charles Louis L'héritier de Brutelle (1746-1800) from Greek eu "well" (see eu-) + kalyptos "covered" (see Calypso); so called for the covering on the bud.
Eucharist (n.) Look up Eucharist at Dictionary.com
"sacrament of the Lord's Supper, the Communion," mid-14c., from Old French eucariste, from Late Latin eucharistia, from Greek eukharistia "thanksgiving, gratitude," later "the Lord's Supper," from eukharistos "grateful," from eu "well" (see eu-) + stem of kharizesthai "show favor," from kharis "favor, grace," from PIE root *gher- (5) "to like, want" (see hortatory). Eukharisteo is the usual verb for "to thank, to be thankful" in the Septuagint and New Testament. Related: Eucharistic.
euchre (n.) Look up euchre at Dictionary.com
card game, 1846, American English, of unknown origin.
Euclidean (adj.) Look up Euclidean at Dictionary.com
1650s, "of or pertaining to Euclid," from Greek Eukleides, c.300 B.C.E. geometer of Alexandria. Now often used in contrast to alternative models based on rejection of some of his axioms. His name in Greek means "renowned," from eu "well" (see eu-) + kleos "fame" (see Clio).
eudaemonic (adj.) Look up eudaemonic at Dictionary.com
"producing happiness," 1865, from Greek eudaimonikos "conducive to happiness," from eudaimonia "happiness," from eu (see eu-) + daimon "guardian, genius" (see daimon). Related: Eudaimonia; eudemonia.
Eudora Look up Eudora at Dictionary.com
fem. proper name, from Greek Eudora, literally "generous," fem. of eudoros, from eu "well" (see eu-) + doron "gift" (see date (n.1)).
Eugene Look up Eugene at Dictionary.com
masc. proper name, from French Eugène, from Latin Eugenius, from Greek Eugenios, from eugenes "well-born" (see eugenics).
Eugenia Look up Eugenia at Dictionary.com
fem. proper name, from Latin, from Greek Eugenia, literally "nobility of birth," fem. of Eugenius (see Eugene).
eugenics (n.) Look up eugenics at Dictionary.com
1883, coined (along with adjective eugenic) by English scientist Francis Galton (1822-1911) on analogy of ethics, physics, etc. from Greek eugenes "well-born, of good stock, of noble race," from eu- "good" (see eu-) + genos "birth" (see genus).
The investigation of human eugenics, that is, of the conditions under which men of a high type are produced. [Galton, "Human Faculty," 1883]
euhemerism (n.) Look up euhemerism at Dictionary.com
1846, "the method of regarding myths as glorified accounts of actual events or persons," from Euhemerus of Sicily (4c. B.C.E.), who wrote "Iera Anagraphe," in which he maintained the Greek deities actually were historical mortals. His name is literally "good day," from eu "well" (see eu-) + hemera "day" (see ephemera). Related: Euhemerist; euhemeristic.
eukaryotic (adj.) Look up eukaryotic at Dictionary.com
also eucaryotic, "characterized by well-defined cells (with nuclei and cell walls)," 1957, from French eucaryote (1925), from Greek eu "well" (see eu-) + karyon "nut, kernel" (see karyo-). Related: Eukaryote; eucaryote.
eulogize (v.) Look up eulogize at Dictionary.com
1810, from eulogy + -ize. Related: Eulogized; eulogizing.
eulogy (n.) Look up eulogy at Dictionary.com
mid-15c., from Latin eulogium, from Greek eulogia "praise; good or fine language," from eu "well" (see eu-) + -logia "speaking" (see -logy). Eu legein meant "speak well of."
Eumenides Look up Eumenides at Dictionary.com
Greek, literally "the well-minded ones," a euphemism of the Erinys.
Eunice Look up Eunice at Dictionary.com
fem. proper name, from Latin, from Greek Eunike, literally "victorious," from eu "well" (see eu-) + nike "victory" (see Nike).
eunuch (n.) Look up eunuch at Dictionary.com
late 14c., from Middle French eunuque and directly from Latin eunuchus, from Greek eunoukhos "castrated man," originally "guard of the bedchamber or harem," from euno-, comb. form of eune "bed," of unknown origin, + -okhos, from stem of ekhein "to have, hold" (see scheme (n.)).

The Greek and Latin forms of the word were used to translate Hebrew saris, which sometimes meant merely "palace official," in Septuagint and Vulgate, probably without an intended comment on the qualities of bureaucrats.
Eunuches is he þat is i-gilded, and suche were somtyme i-made wardeynes of ladyes in Egipt. [John of Trevisa, translation of Higdon's Polychronicon, 1387]
euphemism (n.) Look up euphemism at Dictionary.com
1650s, from Greek euphemismos "use of a favorable word in place of an inauspicious one," from euphemizein "speak with fair words, use words of good omen," from eu- "good" (see eu-) + pheme "speaking," from phanai "speak" (see fame (n.)).

In ancient Greece, the superstitious avoidance of words of ill-omen during religious ceremonies, or substitutions such as Eumenides "the Gracious Ones" for the Furies (see also Euxine). In English, a rhetorical term at first; broader sense of "choosing a less distasteful word or phrase than the one meant" is first attested 1793. Related: Euphemistic; euphemistically.
euphony (n.) Look up euphony at Dictionary.com
mid-15c., from Middle French euphonie, from Late Latin euphonia, from Greek euphonia "sweetness of voice," from euphonos "well-sounding," from eu- "good" (see eu-) + phone "sound, voice," related to phanai "speak" (see fame (n.)).

Hence, euphonium (1865), the musical instrument. Related: Euphonic; euphonious.
euphoria (n.) Look up euphoria at Dictionary.com
1727, a physician's term for "condition of feeling healthy and comfortable (especially when sick)," medical Latin, from Greek euphoria "power of enduring easily," from euphoros, literally "bearing well," from eu "well" (see eu-) + pherein "to carry" (see infer). Non-technical use, now the main one, dates to 1882 and is perhaps a reintroduction.
euphoric (adj.) Look up euphoric at Dictionary.com
1888, with reference to hashish, from euphoria + -ic. The noun meaning "a drug which causes euphoria" is from 1934.
Euphrates Look up Euphrates at Dictionary.com
Old English Eufrate, from Greek Euphrates, from Old Persian Ufratu, perhaps from Avestan huperethuua "good to cross over," from hu- "good" + peretu- "ford." But Kent says "probably a popular etymologizing in O.P. of a local non-Iranian name" ["Old Persian," p.176]. In Akkadian, purattu.
Euphrosyne Look up Euphrosyne at Dictionary.com
name of one of the three Graces in Greek mythology, from Latin, from Greek Euphrosyne, literally "mirth, merriment," from euphron "cheerful, merry, of a good mind," from eu "well" (see eu-) + phren (genitive phrenos) "mind," of unknown origin.
Eurafrican Look up Eurafrican at Dictionary.com
coined 1890 by anthropologist D.G. Brinton to designate a "race" of dark-skinned people inhabiting both sides of the Mediterranean; it was used 1920s to describe the "colored" population of South Africa, and 1960s with reference to political situations involving both continents; see Euro- + Africa.
Eurasia (n.) Look up Eurasia at Dictionary.com
from Euro- + Asia. First record seems to be in H. Reusche's "Handbuch der Geographie" (1858), but see Eurasian.