excursion (n.) Look up excursion at Dictionary.com
1570s, "a deviation in argument," also "a military sally," from Latin excursionem (nominative excursio) "a running forth, sally, excursion, expedition," figuratively "an outset, opening," noun of action from past participle stem of excurrere "run out, run forth, hasten forward; project, extend," from ex- "out" (see ex-) + currere "to run" (see current (adj.)). Sense of "journey" recorded in English by 1660s.
excusable (adj.) Look up excusable at Dictionary.com
late 14c., from Old French escusable, from Latin excusabilis, from excusare (see excuse (v.)). Related: Excusably.
excusatory (adj.) Look up excusatory at Dictionary.com
mid-15c., from Old French excusatoire, from Medieval Latin excusatorius, from Latin excusare "excuse, make an excuse for" (see excuse (v.)).
excuse (v.) Look up excuse at Dictionary.com
mid-13c., "attempt to clear (someone) from blame, find excuses for," from Old French escuser (12c., Modern French excuser) "apologize, make excuses; pardon, exonerate," from Latin excusare "excuse, apologize, make an excuse for, plead as an excuse; release from a charge; decline, refuse, excuse the refusal of" (source also of Spanish excusar, Italian scusare), from ex- "out, away" (see ex-) + causa "accusation, legal action" (see cause (n.)).

Sense of "forgive, pardon, accept another's plea of excuse" is from early 14c. Meaning "to obtain exemption or release from an obligation or duty; beg to be excused" is from mid-14c. in English, as is the sense "defend (someone or something) as right." Sense of "serve as justification for" is from 1530s. Related: Excused; excusing. Excuse me as a mild apology or statement of polite disagreement is from c.1600.
excuse (n.) Look up excuse at Dictionary.com
late 14c., "pretext, justification," from Old French excuse, from excuser (see excuse (v.)). The sense of "that which serves as a reason for being excused" is recorded from mid-15c. As a noun, excusation is the earlier form (mid-14c.).
execrable (adj.) Look up execrable at Dictionary.com
"abominable, deserving of curses," late 14c., from Old French execrable and directly from Latin execrabilis/exsecrabilis "execrable, accursed," from execrari/exsecrari "to curse; to hate" (see execrate). Related: Execrably.
execrate (v.) Look up execrate at Dictionary.com
1560s, from Latin execratus/exsecratus, past participle of execrari/exsecrari "to curse, utter a curse, take a solemn oath with imprecations; hate, abhor," from ex- (see ex-) + sacrare "to devote to" (see sacred). Hence, "to devote off or away; to curse." Related: Execrated; execrating.
execration (n.) Look up execration at Dictionary.com
late 14c., "cursing, act of laying under a curse," from Latin execrationem (nominative execratio) "malediction, curse," noun of action from past participle stem of execrari "to hate, curse," from ex- "out" (see ex-) + sacrare "to devote to holiness or to destruction, consecrate," from sacer "sacred" (see sacred). From 1560s as "an uttered curse."
execute (v.) Look up execute at Dictionary.com
late 14c. "to carry into effect" (transitive, mostly in law with reference to warrants, sentences, etc.), also "carry out or accomplish a course of action" (intransitive), from Old French executer (14c.), from Medieval Latin executare, from Latin execut-/exsecut-, past participle stem of exequi/exsequi "to follow out, to follow to the grave," figuratively "to follow, follow after, accompany, follow up, prosecute, carry out, enforce; execute, accomplish; punish, avenge," from ex- "out" (see ex-) + sequi "follow" (see sequel). Meaning "to inflict capital punishment" is from late 15c., from earlier legal sense "perform judgment or sentence on" (early 15c.). Related: Executed; executing.
execution (n.) Look up execution at Dictionary.com
late 14c., "a carrying out, a putting into effect; enforcement; performance (of a law, statute, etc.), the carrying out (of a plan, etc.)," from Anglo-French execucioun (late 13c.), Old French execucion "a carrying out" (of an order, etc.), from Latin executionem (nominative executio) "an accomplishing," noun of action from past participle stem of exequi/exsequi "to follow out" (see execute).

Specific sense of "act of putting to death" (mid-14c.) is from Middle English legal phrases such as don execution of deth "carry out a sentence of death." Literal meaning "action of carrying something into effect" is from late 14c. John McKay, coach of the woeful Tampa Bay Buccaneers (U.S. football team), when asked by a reporter what he thought of his team's execution, replied, "I think it would be a good idea." Executor and executioner were formerly used indifferently, because both are carrying out legal orders.
executioner (n.) Look up executioner at Dictionary.com
"headsman," 1560s; "one who carries into effect," 1590s; agent noun from execution.
executive (adj.) Look up executive at Dictionary.com
mid-15c., "performed, carried out;" 1640s, "of the branch of government that carries out the laws," from Middle French executif, from Latin executivus, from past participle stem of exequi "follow after; carry out, accomplish" (see execution). The noun in this sense is from 1776, as a branch of government charged with the execution and enforcement of the laws. Meaning "high-ranking businessman" is 1902 in American English; hence the adjectival sense "stylish, luxurious, costly" (1970s). Executive privilege is attested by 1805, American English.
executor (n.) Look up executor at Dictionary.com
c.1300, "person appointed to see that a will is carried into effect," from Anglo-French executour, from Latin executorem/exsecutorem, agent noun from exsequi/exsequi "follow after; carry out, accomplish" (see execution). Fem. form executrix is attested from late 14c. (executrice).

Compare executioner, and also executant "one who does or performs" (especially a musical performer), from 1858; executer "one who performs" (1530s).
exegesis (n.) Look up exegesis at Dictionary.com
1610s, "explanatory note," from Greek exegesis "explanation, interpretation," from exegeisthai "explain, interpret," from ex "out" (see ex-) + hegeisthai "to lead, guide," from PIE root *sag- "to track down, seek out" (see seek (v.)). Meaning "exposition (of Scripture)" is from 1823. Related: Exegetic; exegetical; exegetically.
exegete (n.) Look up exegete at Dictionary.com
"one who expounds or interprets a literary production," 1730s, from Greek exegetes "an expounder, interpreter" (especially of the Bible), from exegeisthai (see exegesis).
exemplar (n.) Look up exemplar at Dictionary.com
late 14c., "original model of the universe in the mind of God," later (mid-15c.) "model of virtue," from Old French exemplaire (14c.) and directly from Late Latin exemplarium, from Latin exemplum "a copy, pattern, model" (see example). Related: Exemplarily.
exemplary (adj.) Look up exemplary at Dictionary.com
1580s, "fit to be an example," from Middle French exemplaire, from Late Latin exemplaris "that serves as an example, pattern, or motto," from exemplum "example, pattern, model" (see example). Earlier (early 15c.) as a noun meaning "a model of conduct," from Late Latin exemplarium.
exemplification (n.) Look up exemplification at Dictionary.com
early 15c., from Anglo-French exemplification, from Medieval Latin exemplificationem (nominative exemplificatio), noun of action from past participle stem of exemplificare "to illustrate" (see exemplify). Holinshed had a back-formation exemplificate.
exemplify (v.) Look up exemplify at Dictionary.com
early 15c., "to illustrate by examples, to instruct by (good) example," from Medieval Latin exemplificare "to illustrate," from Latin exemplum "example, pattern, model" (see example). Meaning "to serve as an example" is recorded from 1793. Related: Exemplified; exemplifies; exemplifying.
exempt (adj.) Look up exempt at Dictionary.com
late 14c., from Old French exempt (13c.) and directly from Latin exemptus, past participle of eximere "remove, take out, take away; free, release, deliver, make an exception of," from ex- "out" (see ex-) + emere "buy," originally "take," from PIE root *em- "to take, distribute" (cognates: Latin sumere "to take, obtain, buy," Old Church Slavonic imo "to take," Lithuanian imui, Sanskrit yamati "holds, subdues"). For sense shift from "take" to "buy," compare Old English sellan "to give," source of Modern English sell "to give in exchange for money;" Hebrew laqah "he bought," originally "he took;" and colloquial English I'll take it for "I'll buy it."
exempt (v.) Look up exempt at Dictionary.com
c.1400, "to relieve or exempt," from Anglo-French and Middle French exempter, from exempt (adj.); see exempt (adj.). Related: Exempted; exempting.
exemption (n.) Look up exemption at Dictionary.com
c.1400, from Old French exemption, exencion or directly from Latin exemptionem (nominative exemptio) "a taking out, removing," noun of action from past participle stem of eximere "take out, take away, remove" (see exempt (adj.)).
exercise (n.) Look up exercise at Dictionary.com
mid-14c., "condition of being in active operation; practice for the sake of training," from Old French exercice (13c.) "exercise, execution of power; physical or spiritual exercise," from Latin exercitium "training, exercise" (of soldiers, horsemen, etc.); "play;" in Medieval Latin also of arts, from exercitare, frequentative of exercere "keep busy, keep at work, oversee, engage busily; train, exercise; practice, follow; carry into effect; disturb, disquiet," literally "remove restraint," from ex- "off" (see ex-) + arcere "keep away, prevent, enclose," from PIE *ark- "to hold, contain, guard" (see arcane).

Original sense may have been driving farm animals to the field to plow. Meaning "physical activity for fitness, etc." first recorded in English late 14c. Also from late 14c. as "a carrying out of an action; a doing or practicing; a disciplinary task." In reference to written schoolwork from early 17c. The ending was abstracted for formations such as dancercise (1967); jazzercise (1977); and boxercise (1985).
exercise (v.) Look up exercise at Dictionary.com
late 14c., "to employ, put into active use," from exercise (n.); originally "to make use of;" also in regard to mental and spiritual training; sense of "engage in physical activity" is from 1650s. From late 14c. in sense of "train, drill, discipline, educate (someone); develop (a skill) by practice." Related: Exercised; exercises; exercising.
exert (v.) Look up exert at Dictionary.com
1660s, "thrust forth, push out," from Latin exertus/exsertus, past participle of exerere/exserere "thrust out, put forth," from ex- "out" (see ex-) + serere "attach, join" (see series). Meaning "put into use" is 1680s. Related: Exerted; exerting.
exertion (n.) Look up exertion at Dictionary.com
1660s, "act of exerting," from exert + -ion. Meaning "vigorous action or effort" is from 1777.
Exeter Look up Exeter at Dictionary.com
Old English Exanceaster, Escanceaster, from Latin Isca (c.150), from Celtic river name Exe "the water" + Old English ceaster "Roman town" (see Chester).
exeunt (v.) Look up exeunt at Dictionary.com
stage direction, late 15c., from Latin, literally "they go out," third person plural present indicative of exire (see exit).
exfoliate (v.) Look up exfoliate at Dictionary.com
1610s, transitive; 1670s intransitive; from Late Latin exfoliatus, past participle of exfoliare "to strip of leaves," from ex- "off" (see ex-) + folium "leaf" (see folio). Related: Exfoliated; exfoliating.
exfoliation (n.) Look up exfoliation at Dictionary.com
early 15c., noun of action from Latin exfoliare (see exfoliate).
exhalation (n.) Look up exhalation at Dictionary.com
late 14c., "act of exhalation; that which is exhaled," from Latin exhalationem (nominative exhalatio) "an exhalation, vapor," noun of action from past participle stem of exhalare "to breathe out" (see exhale).
exhale (v.) Look up exhale at Dictionary.com
c.1400, transitive, originally of liquids, perfumes, etc., from Middle French exhaler (14c.), from Latin exhalare "breathe out, evaporate," from ex- "out" (see ex-) + halare "breathe." Of living things, "to breathe out," 1580s transitive; 1863 intransitive. Related: Exhaled; exhaling.
exhaust (v.) Look up exhaust at Dictionary.com
1530s, "to draw off or out, to use up completely," from Latin exhaustus, past participle of exhaurire "draw off, take away, use up, empty," from ex- "off" (see ex-) + haurire "to draw up" (as water), from PIE *aus- (3) "to draw water." Meaning "make weak or helpless, as by fatigue" is from 1630s. Related: Exhausted; exhausting.
exhaust (n.) Look up exhaust at Dictionary.com
"waste gas," 1848, originally from steam engines, from exhaust (v.). In reference to internal combustion engines by 1896. Exhaust pipe is from 1889.
exhausted (adj.) Look up exhausted at Dictionary.com
mid-17c., "consumed, used up;" of persons, "tired out," past participle adjective from exhaust (v.). Related: Exhaustedly.
exhaustion (n.) Look up exhaustion at Dictionary.com
1640s, "fatigue," noun of action from exhaust (v.) in sense of "drawing off" of strength. Etymological sense "act of drawing out or draining off" is from 1660s in English.
exhaustive (adj.) Look up exhaustive at Dictionary.com
1780s, from exhaust (v.) + -ive. Related: Exhaustively; exhaustiveness.
exhibit (v.) Look up exhibit at Dictionary.com
"offer or present to view," mid-15c., from Latin exhibitus, past participle of exhibere "to hold out, display, show, present, deliver" (see exhibition). Related: Exhibited; exhibiting.
exhibit (n.) Look up exhibit at Dictionary.com
1620s, "document or object produced as evidence in court," from Latin exhibitum, noun use of neuter past participle of exhibere "to display, show" (see exhibition). Meaning "object displayed in a fair, museum, etc." is from 1862. Transferred use of exhibit A "important piece of evidence" is by 1906.
exhibition (n.) Look up exhibition at Dictionary.com
early 14c., "action of displaying," from Old French exhibicion, exibicion "show, exhibition, display," from Late Latin exhibitionem (nominative exhibitio), noun of action from past participle stem of Latin exhibere "to show, display, present," literally "hold out, hold forth," from ex- "out" (see ex-) + habere "to hold" (see habit (n.)). Also from early 15c. as "sustenance, food, source of support." Meaning "that which is exhibited" is from 1786.
exhibitionist (n.) Look up exhibitionist at Dictionary.com
1821, "one who takes part in an exhibition;" psychosexual sense is from 1893, in Craddock's translation of Krafft-Ebing; see exhibition + -ist. Related: Exhibitionism (1893); exhibitionistic (1928). Exhibitioner is from 1670s in the English university sense.
exhibitor (n.) Look up exhibitor at Dictionary.com
1650s (as exhibiter, 1590s), from Late Latin exhibitor, agent noun from past participle stem of Latin exhibere "to display, show" (see exhibition).
exhilarate (v.) Look up exhilarate at Dictionary.com
1530s, from Latin exhilaratus "cheerful, merry," past participle of exhilarare "gladden, cheer," from ex- "thoroughly" (see ex-) + hilarare "make cheerful," from hilarus "cheerful" (see hilarity). Related: Exhilarated; exhilarating.
exhilaration (n.) Look up exhilaration at Dictionary.com
1620s, from Late Latin exhilarationem (nominative exhilaratio) "a gladdening," noun of action from past participle stem of exhilarare (see exhilarate).
exhort (v.) Look up exhort at Dictionary.com
c.1400, "to exhort, encourage," from Old French exhorer (13c.) and directly from Latin exhortari "to exhort, encourage, stimulate" (see exhortation). Related: Exhorted; exhorting.
exhortation (n.) Look up exhortation at Dictionary.com
late 14c., from Old French exhortacion and directly from Latin exhortationem (nominative exhortatio) "an exhortation, encouragement," noun of action from past participle stem of exhortari "to exhort, encourage," from ex- "thoroughly" (see ex-) + hortari "encourage, urge" (see hortatory). From early 15c. as "speech for the purpose of exhortation."
exhortatory (adj.) Look up exhortatory at Dictionary.com
early 15c., from Late Latin exhortatorius, from Latin exhortari (see exhort).
exhumation (n.) Look up exhumation at Dictionary.com
early 15c., from Medieval Latin exhumationem (nominative exhumatio), noun of action from past participle stem of exhumare (see exhume).
exhume (v.) Look up exhume at Dictionary.com
early 15c., from Medieval Latin exhumare "to unearth" (13c.), from Latin ex- "out of" (see ex-) + humare "bury," from humus "earth" (see chthonic). An alternative form was exhumate (1540s), taken directly from Medieval Latin. Figurative use by 1819. Related: Exhumed; exhuming.
exigence (n.) Look up exigence at Dictionary.com
mid-15c., "what is needed" (in a given situation), from Middle French exigence or directly from Latin exigentia "urgency," from exigentem (nominative exigens), present participle of exigere "to drive out; require, demand, claim" (see exact (v.)). From 1580s as "state of being urgent."