fixer (n.) Look up fixer at Dictionary.com
1849, of chemicals, etc.; 1885 as a person who "makes things right;" agent noun from fix (v.).
fixings (n.) Look up fixings at Dictionary.com
"apparatus," 1820, from present participle of fix (v.). American English sense of "food, garnishing" is attested from 1839.
fixity (n.) Look up fixity at Dictionary.com
1660s in physics; general use from 1791; see fix (v.) + -ity.
fixture (n.) Look up fixture at Dictionary.com
1590s, "act of fixing," perhaps from fix (v.) on model of mixture. Meaning "anything fixed or securely fastened" is from 1812.
fizgig (n.) Look up fizgig at Dictionary.com
"light, frivolous woman," 1520s, first element of uncertain origin, second element is Middle English gig "frivolous person" (see gig (n.1)).
fizz (v.) Look up fizz at Dictionary.com
1660s, of imitative origin. Related: Fizzed; fizzing. The noun is recorded from 1812; meaning "effervescent drink" is from 1864.
fizzle (v.) Look up fizzle at Dictionary.com
1530s, "to break wind without noise," probably altered from obsolete fist, from Middle English fisten "break wind" (see feisty) + frequentative suffix -le. Related: Fizzled; fizzling.

Noun sense of "failure, fiasco" is from 1846, originally U.S. college slang for "failure in an exam." Barnhart says it is "not considered as derived from the verb." The verb in this sense is from 1847.
fizzy (adj.) Look up fizzy at Dictionary.com
1885, from fizz + -y (2).
fjord (n.) Look up fjord at Dictionary.com
1670s, from Norwegian fiord, from Old Norse fjörðr, from North Germanic *ferthuz, from PIE *prtus, from *per- "going, passage" (see port (n.1)).
flab (n.) Look up flab at Dictionary.com
"fat, flabbiness," 1951, back-formation from flabby.
flabbergasted (adj.) Look up flabbergasted at Dictionary.com
1772, mentioned (with bored) in a magazine article as a new vogue word, perhaps from some dialect (in 1823 flabbergast was noted as a Sussex word), likely an arbitrary formation from flabby or flapper and aghast.
flabby (adj.) Look up flabby at Dictionary.com
1690s, variant of flappy, which is recorded in the sense of "softly fleshy" from 1590s; see flap. Related: Flabbily; flabbiness.
flaccid (adj.) Look up flaccid at Dictionary.com
1610s, from French flaccide or directly from Latin flaccidus "flabby," from flaccus "flabby, flap-eared," of uncertain origin (OED suggests it's imitative). Related: Flaccidly; flaccidity.
flack (n.) Look up flack at Dictionary.com
"publicity or press agent," 1945, also as a verb by that year, said to have been coined in show biz magazine "Variety" (but this is not the first attested use), supposedly from name of Gene Flack, a movie agent, but influenced by flak. There was a Gene Flack who was an advertising executive in the U.S. during the 1940s, but he seems to have sold principally biscuits, not movies.
flag (n.1) Look up flag at Dictionary.com
"cloth ensign," late 15c., now in all modern Germanic languages, but apparently first recorded in English, origin unknown, but likely connected with flag (v.) or else, like it, perhaps imitative. A less likely guess is that it is from the flag in flagstone on notion of being square and flat. U.S. Flag Day (1894) is in reference to the adopting of the Stars and Stripes by the Continental Congress on June 14, 1777.
flag (v.) Look up flag at Dictionary.com
1540s, "flap about loosely," perhaps a variant of Middle English flakken, flacken "to flap, flutter" (late 14c.), probably from Old Norse flakka "to flicker, flutter," perhaps imitative of something flapping lazily in the wind.

Sense of "go limp, droop" is first recorded 1610s. Meaning "to designate as someone who will not be served more liquor" is from 1980s, probably from use of flags to signal trains, etc., to halt, which led to the verb in this sense (1856, American English). Related: Flagged; flagging.
flag (n.2) Look up flag at Dictionary.com
"flat, split stone," c.1600, earlier "piece cut from turf or sod" (mid-15c.), from Old Norse flaga "stone slab," perhaps related to Old Norse flak (see flake (n.)).
flag (n.3) Look up flag at Dictionary.com
aquatic plant, late 14c., "reed, rush," perhaps from a Scandinavian source (compare Danish flæg "yellow iris") or Dutch flag; perhaps ultimately connected to flag (v.) on notion of "fluttering in the breeze."
flagellant (n.) Look up flagellant at Dictionary.com
late 16c., from Latin flagellantem (nominative flagellans), present participle of flagellare "to scourge, lash" (see flagellum).
flagellate (v.) Look up flagellate at Dictionary.com
1620s, from Latin flagellatus, past participle of flagellare "to scourge, lash" (see flagellum). Related: Flagellated; flagellating. An earlier verb for this was flagellen (mid-15c.).
flagellation (n.) Look up flagellation at Dictionary.com
early 15c., "the scourging of Christ," from French flagellation or directly from Latin flagellationem (nominative flagellatio) "a scourging," from past participle stem of flagellare (see flagellum).
flagellum (n.) Look up flagellum at Dictionary.com
1852, in reference to microbes, from Latin flagellum "whip, scourge," diminutive of flagrum "whip," from PIE root *bhlag- "to strike."
flagitious (adj.) Look up flagitious at Dictionary.com
"shamefully wicked, criminal," late 14c., from Old French flagicieux or directly from Latin flagitiosus "shameful, disgraceful, infamous," from flagitium "shameful act, passionate deed, disgraceful thing," related to flagrum "a whip, scourge, lash," flagitare "to demand importunately," from PIE root *bhlag- "to strike." Related: Flagitiously; flagitiousness.
flagon (n.) Look up flagon at Dictionary.com
mid-15c., from Middle French flacon, Old French flascon, from Late Latin flasconem (nominative flasco) "bottle" (see flask).
flagrance (n.) Look up flagrance at Dictionary.com
1610s, from French flagrance or directly from Latin flagrantia, noun of quality from flagrantem (see flagrant).
flagrant (adj.) Look up flagrant at Dictionary.com
c.1500, "resplendent," from Latin flagrantem (nominative flagrans) "burning, blazing, glowing," figuratively "glowing with passion, eager, vehement," present participle of flagrare "to burn, blaze, glow" from Latin root *flag-, corresponding to PIE *bhleg- "to shine, flash, burn" (cognates: Greek phlegein "to burn, scorch," Latin fulgere "to shine"), from root *bhel- (1) "to shine, flash, burn" (see bleach (v.)). Sense of "glaringly offensive" first recorded 1706, probably from common legalese phrase in flagrante delicto "red-handed," literally "with the crime still blazing." Related: Flagrantly.
flagship (n.) Look up flagship at Dictionary.com
1670s, ship bearing an admiral's flag, from flag (n.) + ship (n.). Figurative use by 1933.
flagstaff (n.) Look up flagstaff at Dictionary.com
1610s, from flag (n.) + staff (n.). The settlement in Arizona, U.S., so called for a July 4, 1876, celebration in which a large flag was flown from a tall tree.
flagstone (n.) Look up flagstone at Dictionary.com
1730, from flag (n.2) "flat, split stone" + stone (n.).
Flaherty Look up Flaherty at Dictionary.com
surname, Irish Flaithbheartach, literally "Bright-Ruler."
flail (n.) Look up flail at Dictionary.com
"implement for threshing grain," c.1100, perhaps from an unrecorded Old English *flegel, which probably represents West Germanic *flagil (cognates: Middle Dutch and Low German vlegel, Old High German flegel, German flegel), a borrowing of Late Latin flagellum "winnowing tool, flail," from Latin flagellum "whip" (see flagellum).
flail (v.) Look up flail at Dictionary.com
15c., from flail (n.); originally "to scourge;" sense of "to move like a flail" is from 1874. Related: Flailed; flailing.
flair (n.) Look up flair at Dictionary.com
mid-14c., "an odor," from Old French flair "odor or scent," from flairer "to smell," from Vulgar Latin *flagrare, dissimilated from Latin fragrare "emit (a sweet) odor" (see fragrant). Sense of "special aptitude" is American English, 1925, perhaps from notion of a hound's ability to track scent.
flak (n.) Look up flak at Dictionary.com
1938, from German Flak, condensed from Fliegerabwehrkanone, literally "pilot warding-off cannon." Sense of "anti-aircraft fire" is 1940; metaphoric sense of "criticism" is c.1963 in American English.
flake (n.) Look up flake at Dictionary.com
"thin, flat piece," early 14c., possibly from Old English *flacca "flakes of snow," from Old Norse flak "loose or torn piece" (related to Old Norse fla "to skin," see flay), from Proto-Germanic *flago- (cognates: Middle Dutch vlac, Dutch vlak "flat, level," Middle High German vlach, German Flocke "flake"); from PIE *plak- (1) "to be flat," extended form of root *pele- (2) "flat, to spread" (see plane (n.1)).
flake (v.) Look up flake at Dictionary.com
early 15c., "to fall in flakes," from flake (n.). Related: Flaked; flaking.
flaky (adj.) Look up flaky at Dictionary.com
1570s, from flake + -y (2). Meaning "eccentric, crazy" first recorded 1959, said to be American English baseball slang, but probably from earlier druggie slang flake "cocaine" (1920s). Flake "eccentric person" is a 1968 back-formation from it.
The term 'flake' needs explanation. It's an insider's word, used throughout baseball, usually as an adjective; someone is considered 'flaky.' It does not mean anything so crude as 'crazy,' but it's well beyond 'screwball' and far off to the side of 'eccentric.' ["New York Times," April 26, 1964]
flam (n.) Look up flam at Dictionary.com
1630s, "sham story, fabrication" (n.); also "to deceive by flattery" (v.); see flim-flam.
flambe (adj.) Look up flambe at Dictionary.com
1886, of certain types of porcelain, 1906 as a term in cookery, from French flambé, past participle of flamber "to singe, blaze," from Old French flambe "flame" (see flamboyant).
flambeau (n.) Look up flambeau at Dictionary.com
also flambeaux, 1630s, from French flambeau, from flambe "flame" (see flamboyant).
flamboyance (n.) Look up flamboyance at Dictionary.com
1891, from flamboyant + -ance.
flamboyant (adj.) Look up flamboyant at Dictionary.com
1832, first used of a 15c.-16c. architectural style with flame-like curves, from French flamboyant "flaming, wavy," present participle of flamboyer "to flame," from Old French flamboier (12c.), from flambe "flame," from flamble, variant of flamme, from Latin flammula (see flame (n.)). Extended sense of "showy, ornate" is 1879. Related: Flamboyantly.
flame (n.) Look up flame at Dictionary.com
mid-14c., from Anglo-French flaume, Old French flamme (10c.), from Latin flammula "small flame," diminutive of flamma "flame, blazing fire," from PIE *bhleg- "to shine, flash," from root *bhel- (1) "to shine, flash, burn" (see bleach (v.)).

The meaning "a sweetheart" is attested from 1640s; the figurative sense of "burning passion" was in Middle English. Flame-thrower (1917) translates German flammenwerfer (1915).
flame (v.) Look up flame at Dictionary.com
early 14c., flamen, from Old French flamer, from flamme (see flame (n.)). The sense of "unleash invective on a computer network" is from 1980s. Related: Flamed; flaming.
flamen (n.) Look up flamen at Dictionary.com
"ancient Roman priest," 1530s, from Latin flamen, of unknown origin, perhaps from PIE root *bhlad- "to worship" (cognates: Gothic blotan, Old English blotan "to sacrifice"). Also used from early 14c. in reference to the ancient pre-Christian British priests, in imitation of Geoffrey of Monmouth.
flamenco (n.) Look up flamenco at Dictionary.com
1896, from Spanish flamenco, first used of Gypsy dancing in Andalusia. The word means "Fleming, native of Flanders" (Dutch Vlaming) and also "flamingo."

Speculation are varied and colorful about the connection between the bird, the people, and the gypsy dance of Andalusia. Spain ruled Flanders for many years, and King Carlos I brought with him to Madrid an entire Flemish court. One etymology suggests the dance was so called from the bright costumes and energetic movements, which the Spanish associated with Flanders; another is that Spaniards, especially Andalusians, like to name things by their opposites, and because the Flemish were tall and blond and the gypsies short and dark, the gypsies were called "Flemish;" others hold that flamenco was the general Spanish word for all foreigners, gypsies included; or that Flemish noblemen, bored with court life, took to partying with the gypsies.
flamer (n.) Look up flamer at Dictionary.com
agent noun from flame (v.). For homosexual slang sense, see flaming.
flaming (adj.) Look up flaming at Dictionary.com
intensifying adjective, late 19c., from present participle of flame (v.). Meaning "glaringly homosexual" is homosexual slang, 1970s (along with flamer (n.) "conspicuously homosexual man"); but flamer "glaringly conspicuous person or thing" (1809) and flaming "glaringly conspicuous" (1781) are much earlier in the general sense, both originally with reference to "wenches."
flamingo (n.) Look up flamingo at Dictionary.com
1560s, from Portuguese flamengo, Spanish flamengo, literally "flame-colored" (compare Greek phoinikopteros "flamingo," literally "red-feathered"), from Provençal flamenc, from flama "flame" (see flame (n.)) + Germanic suffix -enc "-ing, belonging to."
flammable (adj.) Look up flammable at Dictionary.com
1813, from Latin flammare "to set on fire" (from flamma; see flame) + -able.