flirtatious (adj.) Look up flirtatious at Dictionary.com
1834, from flirtation + -ous. Related: Flirtatiously; flirtatiousness.
flirty (adj.) Look up flirty at Dictionary.com
1840, from flirt (v.) + -y (2). Related: Flirtiness.
flit (v.) Look up flit at Dictionary.com
c.1200, flutten "convey, move, take, carry away, go away," perhaps from Old Norse flytja "to remove, bring."
Theire desire ... is to goe to theire newe masters eyther on a Tewsday, or on a Thursday; for ... they say Munday flitte, Neaver sitte. [Henry Best, farming & account book, 1641]
Related: Flitted; flitting. As a noun, from 1835.
flitch (n.) Look up flitch at Dictionary.com
"side of bacon," Middle English flicche (early 13c.), from Old English flicce, related to Old Norse flikki, Middle Low German vlicke "piece of flesh." Not immediately connected to flesh (n.), but perhaps from the same PIE root. A flitch was presented every year at Dunmow, in Essex, to any married couple who could prove they had lived together without quarreling for a year and a day, a custom mentioned as far back as mid-14c.
flitter (v.) Look up flitter at Dictionary.com
1540s, from flit with frequentative suffix. Flitter-mouse (1540s) is occasionally used in English, in imitation of German fledermaus "bat," from Old High German fledaron "to flutter." Related: Flittered; flittering. As a noun, from 1892.
flitty (adj.) Look up flitty at Dictionary.com
1640s, from flit + -y (2). Related: Flittiness.
flivver (n.) Look up flivver at Dictionary.com
"cheap car," especially "Model-T Ford," 1910, of unknown origin.
float (v.) Look up float at Dictionary.com
late Old English flotian "to float" (class II strong verb; past tense fleat, past participle floten), from Proto-Germanic *flotan "to float" (cognates: Old Norse flota, Middle Dutch vloten), from PIE root *pleu- "to flow" (see pluvial). Of motion through air, from 1630s. Related: Floated; floating.
float (n.) Look up float at Dictionary.com
early 12c., "state of floating" (Old English flot meant "body of water"), from float (v.). Meaning "platform on wheels used for displays in parades, etc." is from 1888, probably from earlier sense of "flat-bottomed boat" (1550s). As a type of fountain drink, by 1915.
Float.--An ade upon the top of which is floated a layer of grape juice, ginger ale, or in some cases a disher of fruit sherbet or ice cream. In the latter case it would be known as a "sherbet float" or an "ice-cream float." ["The Dispenser's Formulary: Or, Soda Water Guide," New York, 1915]



Few soda water dispensers know what is meant by a "Float Ice Cream Soda." This is not strange since the term is a coined one. By a "float ice cream soda" is meant a soda with the ice cream floating on top, thus making a most inviting appearance and impressing the customer that you are liberal with your ice cream, when you are not really giving any more than the fellow that mixes his ice cream "out of sight." ["The Spatula," Boston, July, 1908]
floatation (n.) Look up floatation at Dictionary.com
1806, the older, more etymological, but less popular spelling of flotation.
floater (n.) Look up floater at Dictionary.com
"dead body found in water," 1890, U.S. slang, agent noun from float (v.).
floc (n.) Look up floc at Dictionary.com
1921, diminutive of flocculus (see flocculate).
floccinaucinihilipilification (n.) Look up floccinaucinihilipilification at Dictionary.com
"action or habit of estimating as worthless," 1741, a combination of four Latin words (flocci, nauci, nihili, pilifi) all signifying "at a small price" or "for nothing," which were listed together in a rule of the well-known Eton Latin Grammar. The kind of jocular formation that was possible among educated men in Britain in those days. Just so, as in praesenti, the opening words of mnemonic lines on conjugation in Lilley's 16c. Latin grammar, could stand alone as late as 19c. and be understood to mean "rudiments of Latin."
flocculate (v.) Look up flocculate at Dictionary.com
1877, from flocculus (1799, from Modern Latin diminutive of Latin floccus "flock of wool") + -ate. Related: Flocculated; flocculating.
flocculation (n.) Look up flocculation at Dictionary.com
1885, from flocculate + -ion.
flocculent (adj.) Look up flocculent at Dictionary.com
"resembling wool," 1800, from Latin floccus "lock of hair, flock of wool" + -ulent. Related: Floculence.
flock (n.1) Look up flock at Dictionary.com
Old English flocc "a group of persons, company, troop," related to Old Norse flokkr "crowd, troop, band," Middle Low German vlocke "crowd, flock (of sheep);" not found in other Germanic languages; perhaps related to folc "people," but the metathesis would have been unusual for Old English.

Extended c.1200 to "a number of animals of one kind moving or feeding together;" of domestic animals c.1300. Transferred to bodies of Christians, in relation to Christ or their local pastor, from mid-14c.
flock (n.2) Look up flock at Dictionary.com
"tuft of wool," mid-13c., probably from Old French floc, from Latin floccus "flock of wool, lock of hair."
flock (v.) Look up flock at Dictionary.com
"gather, congregate," c.1300, from flock (n.). Related: Flocked; flocking.
floe (n.) Look up floe at Dictionary.com
1817, first used by Arctic explorers, probably from Norwegian flo "layer, slab," from Old Norse flo, related to first element in flagstone (q.v.). Earlier explorers used flake.
flog (v.) Look up flog at Dictionary.com
1670s, slang, perhaps a schoolboy shortening of Latin flagellare "flagellate." Related: Flogged; flogging.
flood (n.) Look up flood at Dictionary.com
Old English flod "a flowing of water, flood, an overflowing of land by water, Noah's Flood; mass of water, river, sea, wave," from Proto-Germanic *floduz "flowing water, deluge" (cognates: Old Frisian flod, Old Norse floð, Middle Dutch vloet, Dutch vloed, German Flut, Gothic flodus), from PIE verbal stem *pleu- "flow, float" (see pluvial). Figurative use by mid-14c.
flood (v.) Look up flood at Dictionary.com
1660s, from flood (n.). Related: Flooded; flooding.
floodgate (n.) Look up floodgate at Dictionary.com
early 13c. in the figurative sense (especially with reference to tears or rain); literal sense is mid-15c.; from flood (n.) + gate (n.).
floodplain (n.) Look up floodplain at Dictionary.com
also flood plain, 1873, from flood (n.) + plain (n.).
floor (v.) Look up floor at Dictionary.com
early 15c., "to furnish with a floor," from floor (n.). Sense of "puzzle, confound" is 1830, from notion of "knock down to the floor" (1640s). Related: Floored; flooring.
floor (n.) Look up floor at Dictionary.com
Old English flor "floor, pavement, ground, bottom (of a lake, etc.)," from Proto-Germanic *floruz "floor" (cognates: Middle Dutch and Dutch vloer, Old Norse flor "floor," Middle High German vluor, German Flur "field, meadow"), from PIE *plaros "flat surface" (source also of Welsh llawr "ground"), enlarged from *pele- (2) "flat, to spread" (see plane (n.1)).

Meaning "level of a house" is from 1580s. The figurative sense in legislative assemblies (as opposed to the platform) is first recorded 1774. Spanish suelo "floor" is from Latin solum "bottom, ground, soil;" German Boden is cognate with English bottom. Floor plan attested from 1867.
flooring (n.) Look up flooring at Dictionary.com
"materials of a floor," 1620s, verbal noun from floor (v.).
floozie (n.) Look up floozie at Dictionary.com
also floozy, "woman of disreputable character," 1902, perhaps a variation of flossy "fancy, frilly" (1890s slang), with the notion of "fluffiness."
flop (v.) Look up flop at Dictionary.com
c.1600, probably a variant of flap with a duller, heavier sound. Sense of "fall or drop heavily" is 1836, that of "collapse, fail" is 1919; though the figurative noun sense of "a failure" is recorded from 1893. Related: Flopped; flopping.
flop (n.) Look up flop at Dictionary.com
1823, in the literal sense, from flop (v.). Figurative use by 1893.
flophouse (n.) Look up flophouse at Dictionary.com
"cheap hotel," hobo slang, 1904, probably related to slang flop (v.) "lie down for sleep" (1907); see flop (v.) + house (n.).
In one of [Cincinnati's] slum districts stands the Silver Moon, a "flop house" (i.e., a house where the occupants are "flopped" out of their hanging bunks by letting down the ropes) .... ["McClure's" magazine, November 1904]
(But this explanation is not found in other early references.)
floppy (adj.) Look up floppy at Dictionary.com
1858, from flop + -y (2). Floppy disc attested from 1972 (short form floppy by 1974).
flora (n.) Look up flora at Dictionary.com
1777, "the plant life of a region or epoch," from Latin Flora, Roman goddess of flowers, from flos (genitive floris) "flower," from *flo-s-, Italic suffixed form of PIE *bhle- "to blossom, flourish" (cognates: Middle Irish blath, Welsh blawd "blossom, flower," Old English blowan "to flower, bloom"), extended form of *bhel- (3) "to thrive, bloom," possibly identical with *bhel- (2) "to blow, swell" (see bole). Used as the title of descriptive plant catalogues since 1640s, but popularized by Linnaeus in his 1745 study of Swedish plants, "Flora Suecica."
floral (adj.) Look up floral at Dictionary.com
1640s, "pertaining to Flora," from French floral (16c.), from Latin floralis "of flowers" (see flora). Meaning "pertaining to flowers" is from 1753.
Florence Look up Florence at Dictionary.com
fem. proper name, from Latin Florentia, fem. of Florentius, literally "blooming," from florens (genitive florentis), present participle of florere "to flower" (see flourish). The c.1700 "Dictionary of the Canting Crew" defines Florence as a slang word for "a Wench that is touz'd and ruffled." This was also the Italian city name (Roman Colonia Florentia, "flowering colony," either literal or figurative), which became Old Italian Fiorenze, in modern Italian Firenze.
Florentine (adj.) Look up Florentine at Dictionary.com
1540s, literally "of or pertaining to the Italian city of Florence," from Latin Florentinus, from Florentia (see Florence). Earliest reference in English is to a type of textile fabric.
florescence (n.) Look up florescence at Dictionary.com
1793, from Modern Latin florescentia, from Latin florescentem (nominative florescens) "blooming," present participle of florescere "to begin to bloom," inceptive of florere "to blossom" (see flourish (v.)).
florescent (adj.) Look up florescent at Dictionary.com
1821, from Latin florescentem, present participle of florescere (see florescence).
floret (n.) Look up floret at Dictionary.com
c.1400, flourette, from Old French florete "little flower; cheap silk material," diminutive of flor "flower," from Latin flora (see flora). Botany sense is from 1670s.
floricide (n.) Look up floricide at Dictionary.com
"one who destroys flowers," 1841, from Latin floris, genitive of flos "flower" (see flora) + -cide.
floriculture (n.) Look up floriculture at Dictionary.com
1822, from Latin floris, genitive of flos "flower" (see flora) + -culture on analogy of agriculture. Related: Floricultural; floriculturist.
florid (adj.) Look up florid at Dictionary.com
1640s, "strikingly beautiful," from French floride "flourishing," from Latin floridus "flowery, in bloom," from flos "flower" (see flora). Sense of "ruddy" is first recorded 1640s. Meaning "profusely adorned, as with flowers," is from 1650s. Related: Floridly.
Florida Look up Florida at Dictionary.com
U.S. state, formerly a Spanish colony, probably from Spanish Pascua florida, literally "flowering Easter," a Spanish name for Palm Sunday, because the peninsula was discovered on that day (March 20, 1513) by the expedition of Spanish explorer Ponce de León (1474-1521). From Latin floridus (see florid).
florin (n.) Look up florin at Dictionary.com
c.1300, from Old French florin, from Italian fiorino, from fiore "flower," from Latin florem "flower" (see flora). The 13c. gold Florentine coin was stamped on the obverse with the image of a lily, the symbol of the city. As the name of an English gold coin, from late 15c.
florist (n.) Look up florist at Dictionary.com
1620s, formed on analogy of French fleuriste, from Latin floris, genitive of flos "flower" (see flora) + -ist.
floruit Look up floruit at Dictionary.com
used now mainly in sense of "period during which a historical person's life work was done," 1843, Latin, literally "he flourished," third person singular perf. indicative of florere (see flourish (v.)). Usually in abbreviation fl.
floss (n.) Look up floss at Dictionary.com
"rough silk," 1759, perhaps from French floche "tuft of wool" (16c.), from Old French floc "tuft, lock," from Latin floccus "tuft of wool." Or from an unrecorded Old English or Old Norse word from the root found in Dutch flos "plush" (17c.). Compare the surname Flossmonger, attested 1314, which might represent a direct borrowing from Scandinavian or Low German. In "The Mill on the Floss" the word is the proper name of a fictitious river in the English Midlands.
flossy (adj.) Look up flossy at Dictionary.com
"resembling floss," 1839, from floss + -y (2).
flotation (n.) Look up flotation at Dictionary.com
1850s, from float (v.) + -ation. Spelling influenced by French (compare floatation).