foodie (n.) Look up foodie at Dictionary.com
"gourmet," 1982, from food + -ie.
foodstuff (n.) Look up foodstuff at Dictionary.com
1870, from food + stuff (n.). Related: Foodstuffs.
fool (n.) Look up fool at Dictionary.com
late 13c., "silly or stupid person," from Old French fol "madman, insane person; idiot; rogue; jester," also "blacksmith's bellows," also an adjective meaning "mad, insane" (12c., Modern French fou), from Latin follis "bellows, leather bag" (see follicle); in Vulgar Latin used with a sense of "windbag, empty-headed person." Compare also Sanskrit vatula- "insane," literally "windy, inflated with wind."
The word has in mod.Eng. a much stronger sense than it had at an earlier period; it has now an implication of insulting contempt which does not in the same degree belong to any of its synonyms, or to the derivative foolish. [OED]
Meaning "jester, court clown" first attested late 14c., though it is not always possible to tell whether the reference is to a professional entertainer or an amusing lunatic on the payroll. As the name of a kind of custard dish, it is attested from 1590s (the food also was called trifle, which may be the source of the name).
There is no foole to the olde foole [Heywood, 1546]
Feast of Fools (early 14c.), from Medieval Latin festum stultorum) refers to the burlesque festival celebrated in some churches on New Year's Day in medieval times. Fool's gold "iron pyrite" is from 1829. Fool's paradise "state of illusory happiness" is from mid-15c. Foolosopher, a most useful insult, turns up in a 1549 translation of Erasmus. Fool's ballocks is described in OED as "an old name" for the green-winged orchid.
fool (v.) Look up fool at Dictionary.com
mid-14c., "to be foolish, act the fool," from fool (n.). The meaning "to make a fool of" is recorded from 1590s. Also as a verb 16c.-17c. was foolify. Related: Fooled; fooling. Fool around is 1875 in the sense of "pass time idly," 1970s in sense of "have sexual adventures."
fool (adj.) Look up fool at Dictionary.com
"foolish, silly," considered modern U.S. colloquial, but it is attested from early 13c., from fool (n.).
foolery (n.) Look up foolery at Dictionary.com
1550s, from fool (n.) + -ery.
foolhardy (adj.) Look up foolhardy at Dictionary.com
early 13c., from fool (n.) + Middle English hardi "bold;" hence "foolishly brave" (see hardy). Compare Old French fol hardi.
foolish (adj.) Look up foolish at Dictionary.com
early 14c., from fool (n.) + -ish. Related: Foolishly; foolishness. Old English words for this were dysig, stunt, dol.
foolproof (adj.) Look up foolproof at Dictionary.com
also fool-proof, 1902, American English, "safe against the incompetence of a fool," from fool (n.) + proof.
foolscap (n.) Look up foolscap at Dictionary.com
literally "fool's cap; cap worn by jesters," 1630s; c.1700 as a type of paper, so called because this type of paper originally was watermarked with a court jester's cap.
foosball (n.) Look up foosball at Dictionary.com
debuted in U.S. 1963 and was a craze on some college campuses for a few years thereafter. Said to have been designed c.1930s in Switzerland. The name is presumably from the pronunciation of Fußball, the German form of (Association) football.
foot (n.) Look up foot at Dictionary.com
Old English fot, from Proto-Germanic *fot (cognates: Old Saxon fot, Old Norse fotr, Dutch voet, Old High German fuoz, German Fuß, Gothic fotus "foot"), from PIE *ped- (cognates: Avestan pad-; Sanskrit pad-, accusative padam "foot;" Greek pos, Attic pous, genitive podos; Latin pes, genitive pedis "foot;" Lithuanian padas "sole," peda "footstep"). Plural form feet is an instance of i-mutation. Of a bed, grave, etc., first recorded c.1300.

The linear measurement of 12 inches was in Old English, from the length of a man's foot. Colloquial exclamation my foot! expressing "contemptuous contradiction" [OED] is first attested 1923, probably a euphemism for my ass, in the same sense, which dates back to 1796 (also see eyewash). The metrical foot (Old English, translating Latin pes, Greek pous in the same sense) is commonly taken as a reference to keeping time by tapping the foot.

To get off on the right foot is from 1905; to put one's best foot foremost first recorded 1849 (Shakespeare has the better foot before, 1596). To put one's foot in (one's) mouth "say something stupid" is attested by 1942; the expression put (one's) foot in something "make a mess of it" is from 1823.
foot (v.) Look up foot at Dictionary.com
c.1400, "dance, move on foot," from foot (n.). To foot a bill is attested from 1848, from the process of tallying the expenses and writing the figure at the bottom ("foot") of the bill.
footage (n.) Look up footage at Dictionary.com
1892, "piece work system to pay miners;" 1916, "the length of film used in a scene, etc.," from foot (n.) as a measure of length + -age.
football (n.) Look up football at Dictionary.com
open-air game, first recorded c.1400; see foot (n.) + ball (n.1). Forbidden in a Scottish statute of 1424. The first reference to the ball itself is late 15c. Figurative sense of "something idly kicked around" is first recorded 1530s. Ball-kicking games date back to the Roman legions, at least, but the sport seems to have risen to a national obsession in England, c.1630. Rules first regularized at Cambridge, 1848; soccer (q.v.) split off in 1863.

The U.S. style (known to some in England as "stop-start rugby with padding") evolved gradually 19c.; the first true collegiate game is considered to have been played Nov. 6, 1869, between Princeton and Rutgers, at Rutgers, but the rules there were more like soccer. A rematch at Princeton Nov. 13, with the home team's rules, was true U.S. football. The earliest recorded application of the word football to this is from 1881.
footer (n.) Look up footer at Dictionary.com
c.1600, "pedestrian;" 1781, "a kick at football;" 1863, British student slang, "the game of football;" see foot (n.), football, -er.
footfall (n.) Look up footfall at Dictionary.com
c.1600; see foot (n.) + fall (n). Perhaps first in Shakespeare.
foothill (n.) Look up foothill at Dictionary.com
"a hill that leads up to a mountain," 1850, American English, from foot (n.) + hill.
foothills (n.) Look up foothills at Dictionary.com
see foothill.
foothold (n.) Look up foothold at Dictionary.com
1620s, from foot (n.) + hold (n.). Figurative use by 1650s.
footing (n.) Look up footing at Dictionary.com
"position of the feet on the ground, stance," late 14c., from foot (n.). Figurative meaning "firm or secure position" is from 1580s; that of "condition on which anything is established" is from 1650s.
footle (v.) Look up footle at Dictionary.com
"to trifle," 1892, from dialectal footer "to trifle," footy "mean, paltry" (1752), perhaps from French se foutre "to care nothing," from Old French foutre "to copulate with," from Latin futuere, originally "to strike, thrust" (see confute). But OED derives the English dialect words from foughty (c.1600), from Dutch vochtig or Danish fugtig "damp, musty;" related to fog (n.).
footless (adj.) Look up footless at Dictionary.com
late 14c., from foot (n.) + -less.
footlights (n.) Look up footlights at Dictionary.com
1836, from foot (of the stage) + light (n.).
footloose (adj.) Look up footloose at Dictionary.com
1690s, in literal sense of "free to move the feet, unshackled," from foot (n.) + loose. Figurative sense of "free to act as one pleases" is from 1873.
footman (n.) Look up footman at Dictionary.com
c.1300, "foot soldier;" late 14c., "one who goes on foot;" as a personal attendant, originally one who ran before or alongside his master's carriage, announcing its arrival (and keeping it from tipping over). The modern, non-jogging servant sense is from c.1700, though the running footmen still were in service mid-18c. From foot (n.) + man (n.).
footnote (n.) Look up footnote at Dictionary.com
1841, from foot (n.) + note (n.). So called from its original position at the foot of a page. Also sometimes formerly Bottom note. As a verb, from 1864. Related: Footnoted; footnoting.
footpad (n.) Look up footpad at Dictionary.com
"highway robber," 1680s, from foot (n.) + pad "pathway," from Middle Dutch pad "way, path," from Proto-Germanic *patha- "way, path" (see path).
footpath (n.) Look up footpath at Dictionary.com
also foot-path 1520s, from foot (n.) + path.
footprint (n.) Look up footprint at Dictionary.com
1550s, from foot (n.) + print. Related: Footprints. Old English had fotspor, fotswæð.
footsie (n.) Look up footsie at Dictionary.com
"amorous play with the feet" [OED], 1944, from foot (n.).
footsore (adj.) Look up footsore at Dictionary.com
also foot-sore, 1719, from foot (n.) + sore (adj.).
footstep (n.) Look up footstep at Dictionary.com
early 13c., "footprint," from foot (n.) + step (n.). Meaning "a tread or fall of the foot" is first attested 1530s. Figurative expression to follow in (someone's) footsteps is from 1540s.
footstool (n.) Look up footstool at Dictionary.com
also foot-stool, 1520s, from foot (n.) + stool.
fop (n.) Look up fop at Dictionary.com
mid-15c., "foolish person," of unknown origin, perhaps related to fob (v.), German foppen "jeer at, make a fool of." Sense of "dandy" is from 1660s.
foppery (n.) Look up foppery at Dictionary.com
1540s, "foolish action," from fop + -ery. Meaning "behavior and manner of a fop" is from 1690s; meaning "foppish attire" is from 1711.
foppish (adj.) Look up foppish at Dictionary.com
c.1600, from fop + -ish. Related: Foppishly; fopishness.
for (prep.) Look up for at Dictionary.com
Old English for "for, before, on account of," from Proto-Germanic *fura (cognates: Old Saxon furi "before," Old Frisian for, Middle Dutch vore, Dutch voor "for, before;" German für "for;" Danish for "for," før "before;" Gothic faur "for," faura "before"); see fore (adv.).

Use of for and fore gradually was differentiated in Middle English. Its use alone as a conjunction (not found before 12c.) probably is a shortening of common Old English phrases such as for þon þy "therefore," literally "for the (reason) that."
for- Look up for- at Dictionary.com
prefix usually meaning "away, opposite, completely," from Old English for-, indicating loss or destruction, or completion, also used as an intensive or pejorative element, which is related to Old Norse for-, Dutch ver-, Old High German fir-, German ver-; from PIE *pr-, from root *per- (1) "forward, through" (see per). Probably originally in Germanic with a sense of "forward, forth," but with complex sense developments in the various languages. Ultimately from the same root as fore (adv.).
forage (n.) Look up forage at Dictionary.com
early 14c. (late 13c. as Anglo-Latin foragium), from Old French forrage "fodder, foraging, pillaging, looting" (12c., Modern French fourrage), from fuerre "hay, straw, forage, fodder" (Modern French feurre) "fodder, straw," from Frankish *fodr "food" or a similar Germanic source (compare Old High German fuotar, Old English fodor); see fodder. Military forage cap attested by 1827.
forage (v.) Look up forage at Dictionary.com
early 15c., from Middle French fourrager, from fourage (Old French forrage; see forage (n.)). Related: Foraged; foraging.
forager (n.) Look up forager at Dictionary.com
late 14c., from Old French foragier, from forrage (see forage (n.)).
foramen (n.) Look up foramen at Dictionary.com
plural foramina, 1670s, from Latin foramen "hole, opening, aperture, orifice," from forare "to pierce" (see bore (v.)).
Foraminifera Look up Foraminifera at Dictionary.com
1835, Modern Latin, neuter plural of foraminifer "bearing holes," from Latin foramen "hole, opening, orifice" (see foramen) + -fer "bearing," from ferre "to bear" (see infer). So called because the shells usually are perforated by pores. Related: Foraminiferous.
foray (n.) Look up foray at Dictionary.com
late 14c., Scottish, from the verb (14c.), perhaps a back-formation of Middle English forreyer "raider, forager" (mid-14c.), from Old French forrier, from forrer "to forage" (see forage (n.)). Disused by 18c.; revived by Scott.
forb (n.) Look up forb at Dictionary.com
1924, from Greek phorbe "fodder, forage."
forbade Look up forbade at Dictionary.com
past tense of forbid.
forbear (v.) Look up forbear at Dictionary.com
"to abstain," Old English forberan "bear up against, control one's feelings, endure," from for- + beran "to bear" (see bear (v.)). Related: Forbearer; forbearing; forbore.
forbear (n.) Look up forbear at Dictionary.com
"ancestor," late 15c., from fore "before" + be-er "one who exists;" agent noun from be.
forbearance (n.) Look up forbearance at Dictionary.com
1570s, originally legal, in reference to enforcement of debt obligations, from forbear (v.) + -ance. General sense of "refraining from" is from 1590s.