freaky (adj.) Look up freaky at Dictionary.com
1824, from freak (n.) + -y (2). Psychedelic sense is from 1966.
freckle (n.) Look up freckle at Dictionary.com
late 14c., also frecken, probably from Old Norse freknur (plural) "freckles" (cognates: Icelandic frekna, Danish fregne, Swedish frägne "freckle"), from PIE *(s)preg- "to jerk, scatter" (see sprout (v.)). Related: Freckles.
freckle (v.) Look up freckle at Dictionary.com
late 14c. (implied in fracled "spotted," from freckle (n.); freckle as a verb is recorded from 1610s. Related: Freckled; freckling.
Freddie Mac Look up Freddie Mac at Dictionary.com
by 1992, vaguely from Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation.
Frederick Look up Frederick at Dictionary.com
masc. proper name, from French Frédéric, from German Friedrich, from Old High German Fridurih, from Proto-Germanic *Frid-ric, literally "peace-rule." Not a common name in medieval England, found mostly in the eastern counties.
free (adj.) Look up free at Dictionary.com
Old English freo "free, exempt from, not in bondage," also "noble; joyful," from Proto-Germanic *frijaz (cognates: Old Frisian fri, Old Saxon and Old High German vri, German frei, Dutch vrij, Gothic freis "free"), from PIE *prijos "dear, beloved," from root *pri- "to love" (cognates: Sanskrit priyah "own, dear, beloved," priyate "loves;" Old Church Slavonic prijati "to help," prijatelji "friend;" Welsh rhydd "free").

The primary sense seems to have been "beloved, friend, to love;" which in some languages (notably Germanic and Celtic) developed also a sense of "free," perhaps from the terms "beloved" or "friend" being applied to the free members of one's clan (as opposed to slaves; compare Latin liberi, meaning both "free" and "children").

Compare Gothic frijon "to love;" Old English freod "affection, friendship," friga "love," friðu "peace;" Old Norse friðr, German Friede "peace;" Old English freo "wife;" Old Norse Frigg "wife of Odin," literally "beloved" or "loving;" Middle Low German vrien "to take to wife," Dutch vrijen, German freien "to woo."

Of nations, "not subject to foreign rule or to despotism," it is recorded from late 14c. (Free world "non-communist nations" attested from 1950.) Sense of "given without cost" is 1580s, from notion of "free of cost." Free lunch, originally offered in bars to draw in business, by 1850, American English. Free pass on railways, etc., attested by 1850. Free speech in Britain used of a privilege in Parliament since the time of Henry VIII. In U.S., as a civil right, it became a prominent phrase in the debates over the Gag Rule (1836).

Free enterprise recorded from 1890; free trade is from 1823. Free will is from early 13c. Free association in psychology is from 1899. Free love "sexual liberation" attested from 1822. Free range (adj.) is attested by 1960. Free and easy "unrestrained" is from 1690s.
free (v.) Look up free at Dictionary.com
Old English freogan "to free, liberate, manumit," also "to love, think of lovingly, honor," from freo (see free (adj.)). Compare Old Frisian fria "to make free;" Old Saxon friohan "to court, woo;" German befreien "to free," freien "to woo;" Old Norse frja "to love;" Gothic frijon "to love." Related: Freed; freeing.
free verse (n.) Look up free verse at Dictionary.com
1908; see vers libre.
free-born (adj.) Look up free-born at Dictionary.com
mid-14c., from free (adj.) + born.
free-for-all (n.) Look up free-for-all at Dictionary.com
"mass brawl" (one in which all may participate), 1881.
free-hand (adv.) Look up free-hand at Dictionary.com
of drawing, from 1848; see free (adj.) + hand.
free-spirited (adj.) Look up free-spirited at Dictionary.com
also freespirited, 1670s, from free (adj.) + spirited.
free-thinker (n.) Look up free-thinker at Dictionary.com
1690s, from free (adj.) + agent noun from think (v.).
freebase Look up freebase at Dictionary.com
1980 (noun and verb), in reference to cocaine. As a chemical process, it returns a salt form of an alkaloid to its pure form. Related: Freebased; freebasing.
freebie Look up freebie at Dictionary.com
also freeby, 1942 (adj.); 1946 (n.); perhaps as early as 1900; formed "arbitrarily" [OED] from free (adj.).
freebooter (n.) Look up freebooter at Dictionary.com
1560s, loan-translation of Dutch vrijbuiter "plunderer, robber," from vrijbuiten "to rob, plunder," from vrijbuit "plunder," literally "free booty," from vrij "free" + buit "booty," from buiten "to exchange or plunder," from Middle Dutch buten, related to Middle Low German bute "exchange" (see booty). See filibuster. The back-formed verb freeboot is recorded from 1590s.
freedman (n.) Look up freedman at Dictionary.com
"manumitted slave," c.1600, from past participle of free (adj.) + man (n.). Also see freeman.
freedom (n.) Look up freedom at Dictionary.com
Old English freodom "freedom, state of free will; charter, emancipation, deliverance;" see free (adj.) + -dom. Freedom-rider recorded 1961, in reference to civil rights activists in U.S. trying to integrate bus lines.
It has been said by some physicians, that life is a forced state. The same may be said of freedom. It requires efforts, it presupposes mental and moral qualities of a high order to be generally diffused in the society where it exists. [John C. Calhoun, speech, U.S. House of Representatives, Jan. 31, 1816]



Freedom Rider Situation Cuts Into Montgomery Juke, Game Revenues [headline, "Billboard," July 24, 1961]
Freedom fighter attested by 1903 (originally with reference to Cuba).
freefall Look up freefall at Dictionary.com
also free fall, free-fall, 1919, originally of parachutists and in rocketry, from free (adj.) + fall (v.).
freehold (n.) Look up freehold at Dictionary.com
early 15c. (implied in freeholder), translating Anglo-French fraunc tenement; see free (adj.) + hold (n.). Related: Freeholder.
freelance (n.) Look up freelance at Dictionary.com
also free lance, free-lance, "medieval mercenary warrior," 1820 ("Ivanhoe"), from free (adj.) + lance (n.); apparently a coinage of Sir Walter Scott's. Figurative sense is from 1864; specifically of journalism by 1882.
freelance (v.) Look up freelance at Dictionary.com
1902, from freelance (n.). Related: Freelancer (1898); freelanced; freelancing.
freeloader (n.) Look up freeloader at Dictionary.com
also free-loader, by 1939, from free (adj.) + agent noun from load (v.). Related: Freeloading. As a verb, freeload is attested by 1967.
freely (adv.) Look up freely at Dictionary.com
Old English freolice; see free (adj.) + -ly (2).
freeman (n.) Look up freeman at Dictionary.com
Old English freoman; see free (adj.) + man (n.).
Freemason (n.) Look up Freemason at Dictionary.com
late 14c., originally a traveling guild of masons with a secret code; in the early 17c. they began accepting honorary members and teaching them the secrets and lore, which by 1717 had developed into the fraternity of Free and Accepted Masons.

The exact origin of the free- is a subject of dispute. Some [such as Klein] see a corruption of French frère "brother," from frèremaçon "brother mason;" others say it was because the masons worked on "free-standing" stones; still others see them as "free" from the control of local guilds or lords [OED].
Freemasonry (n.) Look up Freemasonry at Dictionary.com
mid-15c., from freemason + -ry.
freer (n.) Look up freer at Dictionary.com
"one who sets free," c.1600, from free + -er (1).
freer (adj.) Look up freer at Dictionary.com
comparative of free. See -er (2).
freestyle (n.) Look up freestyle at Dictionary.com
1912, in swimming, in reference to a distance race in which the swimmers may use whatever stroke they choose; 1950 in general use, from free + style. As an adjective, from 1957; as a verb, by 1970 (in martial arts).
freewheeling (adj.) Look up freewheeling at Dictionary.com
1903, from free wheel (1899, see free (adj.) + wheel); a bicycle wheel that turns even when not being pedaled, later from the name of a kind of automobile drive system that allowed cars to coast without being slowed by the engine. Figurative sense is from 1911.
freeze (v.) Look up freeze at Dictionary.com
Old English freosan "turn to ice" (class II strong verb; past tense freas, past participle froren), from Proto-Germanic *freusan "to freeze" (cognates: Old Norse frjosa, Old High German friosan, German frieren "to freeze," Gothic frius "frost"), from Proto-Germanic *freus-, equivalent to PIE root *preus- "to freeze," also "to burn" (cognates: Sanskrit prusva, Latin pruina "hoarfrost," Welsh rhew "frost," Sanskrit prustah "burnt," Albanian prus "burning coals," Latin pruna "a live coal").

Transitive sense first recorded 14c., figurative sense c.1400. Meaning "become rigid or motionless" attested by 1720. Sense of "fix at a certain level, make non-transactable" is 1922. Freeze frame is from 1960, originally "a briefly Frozen Shot after the Jingle to allow ample time for Change over at the end of a T.V. 'Commercial.' " ["ABC of Film & TV," 1960].
freeze (n.) Look up freeze at Dictionary.com
c.1400, from freeze (v.).
freezer (n.) Look up freezer at Dictionary.com
1847 as the name of an item in ice-cream manufacture; from freeze (v.) + -er (1). As a household appliance, from 1945. Freezer burn attested from 1929.
freight (n.) Look up freight at Dictionary.com
early 13c., fraght, from Middle Dutch or Middle Low German vracht, vrecht, meaning originally "cost of transport" and probably from a lost Old Frisian word, from Proto-Germanic *fra-aihtiz "absolute possession, property" (source also of Old High German freht "earnings"), from *fra-, intensive prefix, + *aik "to be master of, possess," from PIE *aik- (see owe). Meaning "transporting of goods or passengers for money" is from late 14c. Danish fragt, Swedish frakt apparently also are from Frisian. As a verb, from late 14c.
freightage (n.) Look up freightage at Dictionary.com
1690s, a hybrid word, from freight + -age.
freighter (n.) Look up freighter at Dictionary.com
1620s, "one who loads," agent noun from freight (v.). Meaning "a cargo vessel" is from 1839, American English.
French (adj.) Look up French at Dictionary.com
Old English frencisc "of the Franks," from Franca (see Frank). The noun is from Old English Frencisc. As the name of a language, from late 13c.

Euphemistic meaning "bad language" (pardon my French) is from 1895. Used in many combination-words, often dealing with food or sex. French dressing recorded by 1860; French toast is from 1630s. French letter "condom" (c.1856, perhaps on resemblance of sheepskin and parchment), French (v.) "perform oral sex on" (c.1917) and French kiss (1923) all probably stem from the Anglo-Saxon equation of Gallic culture and sexual sophistication, a sense first recorded 1749 in the phrase French novel.

To take French leave, "depart without telling the host," is 1771, from a social custom then prevalent. However, this is said to be called in France filer à l'anglaise, literally "to take English leave."
French fries (n.) Look up French fries at Dictionary.com
1903, American English, earlier French fried potatoes (by 1883). French frieds (1944) never caught on. Simple short form fries attested by 1973. In the Upper Midwest of the U.S., sometimes called American fries (1950).
Frenchify (v.) Look up Frenchify at Dictionary.com
1590s, from French + -ify. Usually contemptuous (Richardson in his introduction to "Pamela," beseeches the editor not to "Frenchify our English solidity into froth and whip-syllabub"). Related: Frenchified; Frenchifying.
frenetic (adj.) Look up frenetic at Dictionary.com
late 14c., from Old French frenetike, from Latin phreneticus "delirious," alteration of Greek phrenitikos, from phrenitis "frenzy," literally "inflammation of the brain," from phren "mind, reason" (from PIE *gwhren- "to think") + -itis. The classical ph- was restored mid-16c. Related: Frenetically.
frenzied (adj.) Look up frenzied at Dictionary.com
1796; see frenzy.
frenzy (n.) Look up frenzy at Dictionary.com
mid-14c., "delirium, insanity," from Old French frenesie, from Medieval Latin phrenesia, from phrenesis, back-formation from Latin phreneticus "delirious" (see frenetic). Meaning "excited state of mind" is from c.1400.
Freon (n.) Look up Freon at Dictionary.com
refrigerant chemical, 1932, proprietary name in U.S. for fluorocarbons used in refrigeration technology. "The name was apparently constructed from fre(eze) + -on used as an arbitrary suffix" [Flood].
frequence (n.) Look up frequence at Dictionary.com
1530s, from French fréquence, from Latin frequentia (see frequent).
frequency (n.) Look up frequency at Dictionary.com
1640s, "fact of occurring often," from Latin frequentia "a crowding, crowd," from frequentem (see frequent).

Earlier it had been used in a now-obsolete sense of "state of being crowded" (mid-16c.); sense in physics, "rate of recurrence," especially of a vibration, is from 1831. In radio electronics, frequency modulation (1922, abbreviated F.M.) as a system of broadcasting is distinguished from amplitude modulation (or A.M.).
frequent (adj.) Look up frequent at Dictionary.com
mid-15c., "ample, profuse," from Middle French frequent, or directly from Latin frequentem (nominative frequens) "crowded, repeated," of uncertain origin. Meaning "common, usual" is from 1530s; that of "happening at short intervals, often recurring" is from c.1600.
frequent (v.) Look up frequent at Dictionary.com
late 15c., from Middle French frequenter, from Latin frequentare "visit regularly," from frequentem (see frequent (adj.)). Related: Frequented; frequenting.
frequentative (n.) Look up frequentative at Dictionary.com
"verb which expresses repetition of action," 1520s, from French fréquentatif, from Late Latin frequentativus "that which denotes the repetition of an act," from Latin frequentatus, past participle of frequentare "visit regularly," from frequentem (see frequent (adj.)).
frequently (adv.) Look up frequently at Dictionary.com
1530s, from frequent (adj.) + -ly (2).