hound (v.) Look up hound at Dictionary.com
"hunt with hounds," 1520s, from hound (v.). Sense of "pursue relentlessly" is first recorded c. 1600. Related: Hounded; hounding.
houndstooth Look up houndstooth at Dictionary.com
also hound's tooth, as a design pattern, 1936, so called for resemblance.
hour (n.) Look up hour at Dictionary.com
mid-13c., from Old French hore "one-twelfth of a day" (sunrise to sunset), from Latin hora "hour, time, season," from Greek hora "any limited time," from PIE *yor-a-, from root *yer- "year, season" (see year). Greek hora was "a season; 'the season;'" in classical times, sometimes, "a part of the day," such as morning, evening, noon, night.

The Greek astronomers apparently borrowed the notion of dividing the day into twelve parts (mentioned in Herodotus) from the Babylonians (night continued to be divided into four watches), but as the amount of daylight changed throughout the year, the hours were not fixed or of equal length. Equinoctal hours did not become established in Europe until the 4c., and as late as 16c. distinction sometimes was made between temporary (unequal) hours and sidereal (equal) ones. The h- has persisted in this word despite not being pronounced since Roman times. Replaced Old English tid, literally "time" (see tide (n.)) and stund "period of time, point of time, hour" (compare German Stunde "hour"), As a measure of distance ("the distance that can be covered in an hour") it is recorded from 1785.
hourglass (n.) Look up hourglass at Dictionary.com
1510s, from hour + glass. Used 19c. in a variety of technical and scientific senses to describe the shape; reference to women's bodies is attested by 1897.
Men condemn corsets in the abstract, and are sometimes brave enough to insist that the women of their households shall be emancipated from them; and yet their eyes have been so generally educated to the approval of the small waist, and the hourglass figure, that they often hinder women who seek a hygienic style of dress. [Mary Ashton Rice Livermore, "The Story of My Life," 1898]
houri (n.) Look up houri at Dictionary.com
"nymph of Muslim paradise," 1737, from French houri (1650s), from Persian huri "nymph in Paradise," from Arabic haura "to be beautifully dark-eyed," like a gazelle + -i, Persian formative element denoting the singular.
hourly Look up hourly at Dictionary.com
late 15c. (adv.); 1510s (adj.), from hour + -ly (2).
house (n.) Look up house at Dictionary.com
Old English hus "dwelling, shelter, house," from Proto-Germanic *husan (cognates: Old Norse, Old Frisian hus, Dutch huis, German Haus), of unknown origin, perhaps connected to the root of hide (v.) [OED]. In Gothic only in gudhus "temple," literally "god-house;" the usual word for "house" in Gothic being razn.

Meaning "family, including ancestors and descendants, especially if noble" is from c. 1000. The legislative sense (1540s) is transferred from the building in which the body meets. Meaning "audience in a theater" is from 1660s (transferred from the theater itself, playhouse); as a dance club DJ music style, probably from the Warehouse, a Chicago nightclub where the style is said to have originated. Zodiac sense is first attested late 14c. To play house is from 1871; as suggestive of "have sex, shack up," 1968. House arrest first attested 1936. On the house "free" is from 1889.
And the Prophet Isaiah the sonne of Amos came to him, and saide vnto him, Thus saith the Lord, Set thine house in order: for thou shalt die, and not liue. [2 Kings xx:1, version of 1611]
house (v.) Look up house at Dictionary.com
"give shelter to," Old English husian "to take into a house" (cognate with German hausen, Dutch huizen); see house (n.). Related: Housed; housing.
houseboat (n.) Look up houseboat at Dictionary.com
1790, from house (n.) + boat (n.).
housebreak (v.) Look up housebreak at Dictionary.com
1820, "to break into a house criminally;" see house (n.) + break (v.). Perhaps a back-formation from housebreaker, attested from mid-14c. Sense of "to train a domestic animal to be clean in the house" is from 1881. Related: Housebreaking; housebroken.
housefly (n.) Look up housefly at Dictionary.com
also house-fly, early 15c., from house (n.) + fly (n.).
houseful Look up houseful at Dictionary.com
c. 1300, from house (n.) + -ful.
household (n.) Look up household at Dictionary.com
late 14c., "members of a family collectively (including servants)," also "furniture and articles belonging to a house," from house (n.) + hold (n.1). Related: Householder.
housekeeper (n.) Look up housekeeper at Dictionary.com
mid-15c., "householder," from house (n.) + agent noun of keep (v.). Sense of "female head domestic servant of a house" is from c. 1600.
housekeeping (n.) Look up housekeeping at Dictionary.com
1540s, from house (n.) + present participle of keep (v.).
housewarming (n.) Look up housewarming at Dictionary.com
"celebration of a new home," 1570s, from house (n.) + present participle of warm.
housewife (n.) Look up housewife at Dictionary.com
early 13c., husewif, "woman, usually married, in charge of a family or household" (compare husebonde; see husband), from huse "house" (see house (n.)) + wif "woman" (see wife). Also see hussy. Related: Housewifely.
housing (n.1) Look up housing at Dictionary.com
"buildings, lodgings," early 14c., husing, from the root of house (n.).
housing (n.2) Look up housing at Dictionary.com
"ornamental covering," c. 1300, houce "covering for the back and flanks of a horse," from Old French houce "mantle, horse-blanket" (Modern French housse), from Medieval Latin hultia "protective covering," from a Germanic source, from Proto-Germanic *hulfti (cognates: Middle Dutch hulfte "pocket for bow and arrow," Middle High German hulft "covering"), from PIE root *kel- (2) "to cover, conceal" (see cell). Sense of "case or enclosure for machine or part" is first recorded 1882.
Houston Look up Houston at Dictionary.com
city in Texas, U.S., founded 1836 and named for first president of Texas, Sam Houston. The family name is from the barony of Houston in Lanark.
Houyhnhnm Look up Houyhnhnm at Dictionary.com
1727, in "Gulliver's Travels," coined by Swift to suggest whinnying.
hove (v.1) Look up hove at Dictionary.com
"wait, linger, hover," mid-13c., of unknown origin. Chiefly nautical at first, of ships standing off a coast, also of birds in the air. Common 13c.-16c., then superseded by its derivative, hover.
hove (v.2) Look up hove at Dictionary.com
"to rise up, to swell," 1590s, from heave, perhaps pulled from a past tense form.
hovel (n.) Look up hovel at Dictionary.com
mid-14c., "roofed passage, vent for smoke," later "shed for animals" (mid-15c.), of unknown origin. Meaning "shed for human habitation; rude or miserable cabin" is from 1620s. It also sometimes meant "canopied niche for a statue or image" (mid-15c.).
hover (v.) Look up hover at Dictionary.com
c. 1400, hoveren, frequentative of hoven "hover, tarry, linger;" see hove (1). Related: Hovered; hovering. As a noun from 1510s.
hovercraft Look up hovercraft at Dictionary.com
1959, from hover + craft. A proprietary name after 1961.
how (adv.) Look up how at Dictionary.com
Old English hu, from Proto-Germanic *hwo- (cognates: Old Saxon hwo, Old Frisian, Middle Dutch hu. Dutch hoe, German wie, Gothic hvaiwa "how"), from common PIE interrogative pronominal stem *kwo- (see who). How come? for "why?" is recorded from 1848. And how! emphatic, first recorded 1865. The formulation was common in book and article titles by then (such as The National Debt, and How to Pay It), but Pennsylvania writer Bayard Taylor, in whom it is first recorded, seems to regard it as a German or German-American expression.
how (interj.) Look up how at Dictionary.com
Native American greeting, Siouxan (Dakota hao, Omaha hau); first recorded 1817 in English, but noted early 17c. by French missionary Jean de Brebeuf among Hurons as an expression of approval (1636).
Howard Look up Howard at Dictionary.com
proper name, from Old French Huard, from a Germanic source similar to Old High German *Hugihard "heart-brave," or *Hoh-weard, literally "high defender; chief guardian." Also probably in some cases a confusion with cognate Old Norse Haward, and as a surname also with unrelated Hayward. In some rare cases from Old English eowu hierde "ewe herd."
howbeit Look up howbeit at Dictionary.com
late 14c., contraction of how be it.
howdah Look up howdah at Dictionary.com
1774, from Persian and Urdu haudah, from Arabic haudaj "litter carried by a camel" (or elephant).
howdy Look up howdy at Dictionary.com
1837, earlier how de (1828), first recorded in Southern U.S. dialect, contraction of how do you do (1630s), phrase inquiring after someone's health; earlier how do ye (1560s).
however Look up however at Dictionary.com
late 14c., from how + ever.
howitzer (n.) Look up howitzer at Dictionary.com
1680s, via Dutch houwitser (1660s), German Haubitze from Bohemian houfnice "a catapult," from houf "heap, crowd," a loan-word from Middle High German hufe "heap." Introduced to German during the Hussite wars, 14c.
howl (v.) Look up howl at Dictionary.com
early 13c., houlen, probably ultimately of imitative origin; similar formations are found in other Germanic languages. Related: Howled; howling. As a noun from 1590s.
howler Look up howler at Dictionary.com
1832, "animal that howls," agent noun from howl (v.). Meaning "glaring blunder, ridiculous mistake" is first recorded 1890.
hoyden (n.) Look up hoyden at Dictionary.com
1590s, of unknown origin; perhaps from Dutch heiden "rustic, uncivilized man," from Middle Dutch heiden "heathen" (see heathen). Originally in English "rude, boorish fellow;" sense of "ill-bred, boisterous female" first recorded 1670s.
Hoyle Look up Hoyle at Dictionary.com
cited as a typical authority on card or board games, in reference to Edmond Hoyle (1672-1769), author of several works on card-playing. The surname, according to Bardsley, represents a Northern English dialectal pronunciation of hole. "In Yorks and Lancashire hole is still dialectically hoyle. Any one who lived in a round hollow or pit would be Thomas or Ralph in the Hoyle." ["Dictionary of English and Welsh Surnames," London, 1901]
HTML Look up HTML at Dictionary.com
1992, standing for Hypertext Markup Language.
http Look up http at Dictionary.com
abbreviation of hypertext transfer protocol, by 1990.
HUAC (n.) Look up HUAC at Dictionary.com
1950, American English, approximate acronym for House Committee to Investigate un-American Activities (1938-1975).
hub (n.) Look up hub at Dictionary.com
"solid center of a wheel," 1640s, perhaps from hubbe, originally "lump," the source of hob of a fireplace and hobnail, as in boots. A wheelwright's word, not generally known or used until c. 1828; it reached wider currency in connection with bicycles. Meaning "center of interest or activity or importance" first recorded 1858 in writings of Oliver W. Holmes, and originally especially of Boston.
"Boston State-House is the hub of the solar system." [O.W. Holmes, "Autocrat of the Breakfast Table"]



"[E]verybody knows that Boston used to be called the Hub, meaning the hub of the universe. It may still be the hub, because the center of a wheel moves slowly." [J.P. Marquand, "Life," March 24, 1941]
hub-bub (n.) Look up hub-bub at Dictionary.com
see hubbub.
hubba-hubba Look up hubba-hubba at Dictionary.com
U.S. slang cry of excitement or enthusiasm, first recorded 1944.
Hubble (n.) Look up Hubble at Dictionary.com
space telescope placed in orbit 1990, named for U.S. astronomer Edwin P. Hubble (1889-1953).
hubbub (n.) Look up hubbub at Dictionary.com
1550s, whobub "confused noise," generally believed to be of Irish origin, perhaps from Gaelic ub!, expression of aversion or contempt, or Old Irish battle cry abu, from buide "victory."
hubby (n.) Look up hubby at Dictionary.com
colloquial shortening of husband, attested from 1680s, with -y (3).
hubcap (n.) Look up hubcap at Dictionary.com
also hub cap, 1896, from hub + cap (n.).
Hubert Look up Hubert at Dictionary.com
masc. proper name, from French, from Old High German Hugubert, literally "bright-minded," from hugu "mind" (see Hugh) + beraht "bright" (see Albert).
hubris (n.) Look up hubris at Dictionary.com
also hybris, 1884, a back-formation from hubristic or else from Greek hybris "wanton violence, insolence, outrage," originally "presumption toward the gods;" the first element probably PIE *ud- "up, out," but the meaning of the second is debated.