immobile (adj.) Look up immobile at
mid-14c., from Old French immoble "immovable, fixed, motionless," from Latin immobilis "immovable" (also, figuratively, "hard-hearted"), from assimilated form of in- "not, opposite of" (see in- (1)) + mobilis (see mobile (adj.)). Hence, immobilism "policy of extreme conservatism" (1949, from French immobilisme).
immobility (n.) Look up immobility at
early 15c., from Middle French immobilité (14c.) or directly from Latin immobilitatem (nominative immobilitas), noun of quality from immobilis (see immobile).
immobilization (n.) Look up immobilization at
1846, noun of action from immobilize.
immobilize (v.) Look up immobilize at
1843, from immobile + -ize. Perhaps modeled on French immobiliser (1835). Related: Immobilized; immobilizing.
immoderate (adj.) Look up immoderate at
late 14c., from Latin immoderatus "boundless, immeasurable," figuratively "unrestrained, excessive," from assimilated form of in- "not, opposite of" (see in- (1)) + moderatus "restrained" (see moderate). Related: Immoderately.
immoderation (n.) Look up immoderation at
early 15c., from Latin immoderationem (nominative immoderatio) "want of moderation, excess," from immoderatus (see immoderate).
immodest (adj.) Look up immodest at
1560s, "arrogant, impudent, pretentious," from Latin immodestus "unrestrained, excessive," from assimilated form of in- "not, opposite of" (see in- (1)) + modestus (see modest). Meaning "indecent" is from 1580s. Related: immodestly.
immodesty (n.) Look up immodesty at
1590s, from Latin immodestia "intemperate conduct," from immodestus (see immodest).
immolate (v.) Look up immolate at
1540s, "to sacrifice, kill as a victim," from Latin immolatus, past participle of immolare "to sacrifice," originally "to sprinkle with sacrificial meal," from assimilated form of in- "into, in, on, upon" (see in- (2)) + mola (salsa) "(sacrificial) meal," related to molere "to grind" (see mallet). Related: Immolated; immolating.
immolation (n.) Look up immolation at
early 15c., "a sacrificing" (originally especially with reference to Christ), from Middle French immolation (13c.) or directly from Latin immolationem (nominative immolatio) "a sacrificing," noun of action from past participle stem of immolare (see immolate).
immoral (adj.) Look up immoral at
1650s, from assimilated form of in- (1) "not" + moral (adj.). Related: Immorally.
immorality (n.) Look up immorality at
1560s, from assimilated form of in- (1) "not, opposite of" + morality.
immortal (adj.) Look up immortal at
"deathless," late 14c., from Latin immortalis "deathless, undying," from assimilated form of in- "not, opposite of" (see in- (1)) + mortalis "mortal" (see mortal (adj.)). In reference to fame, literature, etc., attested from 1510s (a sense also found in classical Latin). As a noun, from mid-17c.
immortality (n.) Look up immortality at
mid-14c., "deathlessness," from Old French immortalité (13c.) and directly from Latin immortalitatem (nominative immortalitas) "deathlessness, endless life," from immortalis (see immortal). Sense of "everlasting fame" is from 1530s.
immortalization (n.) Look up immortalization at
c. 1600, noun of action or state from immortalize.
immortalize (v.) Look up immortalize at
1560s, from immortal + -ize. Perhaps modeled on Middle French immortaliser. Related: Immortalized; immortalizing.
immortelle (n.) Look up immortelle at
"flower which preserves its shape and color after being dried," 1832, from French fem. of immortel "undying" (see immortal).
immovability (n.) Look up immovability at
late 14c.; see immovable + -ity.
immovable (adj.) Look up immovable at
late 14c., literal and figurative, from assimilated form of in- (1) "not, opposite of" + movable. Related: Immovably.
immune (adj.) Look up immune at
mid-15c., "free; exempt," back-formation from immunity. Latin immunis meant "exempt from public service, free from taxes." Specific modern medical sense of "exempt from a disease" (typically because of inoculation) is from 1881. Immune system attested by 1917.
immunity (n.) Look up immunity at
late 14c., "exempt from service or obligation," from Old French immunité and directly from Latin immunitatem (nominative immunitas) "exemption from performing public service or charge," from immunis "exempt, free," from assimilated form of in- "not, opposite of" (see in- (1)) + munis "performing services" (compare municipal), from PIE *moi-n-es-, suffixed form of root *mei- (1) "to change" (see mutable). Medical sense "protection from disease" is 1879, from French or German.
immunization (n.) Look up immunization at
1893, from immunize + -ation.
immunize (v.) Look up immunize at
1889, from immune + -ize. Related: Immunized; immunizing.
immunodeficiency (n.) Look up immunodeficiency at
1969, from comb. form of immune + deficiency.
immunology (n.) Look up immunology at
by 1906, a hybrid from comb. form of immune + -ology. Related: Immunological; immunologist.
immure (v.) Look up immure at
1580s, from Middle French emmurer and directly from Medieval Latin immurare, literally "to shut up within walls," from assimilated form of in- "into, in" (see in- (2)) + Latin murus "wall" (see mural). Related: Immured; immuring.
immutability (n.) Look up immutability at
1590s, from Latin immutabilitas, from immutabilis (see immutable).
Nought may endure but Mutability. [Shelley]
immutable (adj.) Look up immutable at
early 15c., from Old French immutable and directly from Latin immutabilis "unchangeable," from assimilated form of in- "not, opposite of" (see in- (1)) + mutabilis "changeable," from mutare "to change" (see mutable). Related: Immutably.
imp (n.) Look up imp at
Old English impe, impa "young shoot, graft," from impian "to graft," probably an early West Germanic borrowing from Vulgar Latin *imptus, from Late Latin impotus "implanted," from Greek emphytos, verbal adjective formed from emphyein "implant," from em- "in" + phyein "to plant" (see physic).

Sense of "child, offspring" (late 14c.) came from transfer of word from plants to people, with notion of "newness" preserved. Modern meaning "little devil" (1580s) is from common use in pejorative phrases like imp of Satan.
Suche appereth as aungelles, but in very dede they be ymps of serpentes. ["The Pilgrimage of Perfection," 1526]
impact (v.) Look up impact at
c. 1600, "press closely into something," from Latin impactus, past participle of impingere "to push into, dash against, thrust at" (see impinge). Originally sense preserved in impacted teeth (1876). Sense of "strike forcefully against something" first recorded 1916. Figurative sense of "have a forceful effect on" is from 1935. Related: Impacting.
impact (n.) Look up impact at
1781, "collision," from impact (v.). Figurative sense of "forceful impression" is from 1817 (Coleridge).
impactful (adj.) Look up impactful at
1961, originally in advertising, from impact + -ful. Related: Impactfully; impactfulness.
impaction (n.) Look up impaction at
1739, from Latin impactionem (nominative impactio) "a striking against," noun of action from past participle stem of impingere (see impinge).
impair (v.) Look up impair at
late 14c., earlier ampayre, apeyre (c. 1300), from Old French empeirier (Modern French empirer), from Vulgar Latin *impeiorare "make worse," from assimilated form of in- "into, in" (see in- (2)) + Late Latin peiorare "make worse" (see pejorative). In reference to driving under the influence of alcohol, first recorded 1951 in Canadian English. Related: Impaired; impairing.
impairment (n.) Look up impairment at
mid-14c., emparement, from Old French empeirement, from empeirier (see impair). Re-Latinized spelling is from 1610s.
impala (n.) Look up impala at
1875, from Zulu im-pala "gazelle."
impale (v.) Look up impale at
1520s, "to enclose with stakes, fence in," from Middle French empaler and directly from Medieval Latin impalare "to push onto a stake," from assimilated form of in- "into, in" (see in- (2)) + Latin palus "a stake, prop, stay; wooden post, pole," from PIE *pak-slo-, from root *pag-/*pak- "to fasten" (see pact). Sense of "pierce with a pointed stake" (as torture or punishment) first recorded 1610s. Related: Impaled; impaling.
impalement (n.) Look up impalement at
1590s, from French empalement, from empaler (see impale).
impalpable (adj.) Look up impalpable at
c. 1500, from French impalpable, from Medieval Latin impalpabilis, from assimilated form of in- "not, opposite of" (see in- (1)) + palpabilis (see palpable). Figurative use from 1774. Related: Impalpably; impalpability.
impanate (adj.) Look up impanate at
"present in the (consecrated) bread," 1540s, from Church Latin impanatus, past participle of impanare "to embody in bread," from assmiliated form of in- "in, into" (see in- (2)) + panis "bread" (see food).
impart (v.) Look up impart at
early 15c., "to give a part of (one's possessions); late 15c., "to share, take part," from Old French impartir (14c.), from Late Latin impartire (also impertire) "to share in, divide with another, communicate," from assimilated form of in- "into, in" (see in- (2)) + partire "to divide, part" (see part (v.)). Related: Imparted; imparting.
impartial (adj.) Look up impartial at
formed in English 1590s from assimilated form of in- (1) "not, opposite of" + partial. First recorded in "Richard II."
impartiality (n.) Look up impartiality at
1610s; see impartial + -ity.
impassable (adj.) Look up impassable at
"that cannot be passed," 1560s, from im- + passable.
impasse (n.) Look up impasse at
1851, "blind alley," from French impasse "impassable road, blind alley, impasse," from assimilated form of in- "not, opposite of" (see in- (1)) + Middle French passe "a passing," from passer "to pass" (see pass (v.)). Supposedly coined by Voltaire as a euphemism for cul de sac. Figurative use also from 1851.
impassible (adj.) Look up impassible at
"incapable of feeling pain, exempt from suffering," mid-14c., from Old French impassible (13c.), from Church Latin impassibilis "incapable of passion," from assimilated form of in- "not, opposite of" (see in- (1)) + passibilis, from passio "suffering" (see passion). Related: Impassibility.
impassion (v.) Look up impassion at
1590s, from Italian impassionare "to fill with passion," from im- "in, into" (see im-) + passione "passion," from Latin passionem (see passion). Related: Impassioned.
impassionate (adj.) Look up impassionate at
"free from passion," 1620s, from in- (1) "not" + passionate. Related: Impassionately.
impassioned (adj.) Look up impassioned at
c. 1600, past participle adjective from impassion.
impassive (adj.) Look up impassive at
1660s, "not feeling pain," from assimilated form of in- "not, opposite of" (see in- (1)) + passive. Meaning "void of emotions" is from 1690s. Related: Impassively; impassiveness (1640s).