impassivity (n.) Look up impassivity at
1794, from impassive + -ity.
impasto (n.) Look up impasto at
laying on of colors thickly," 1784, from Italian impasto, noun of action from impastare "to raise paste; to put in paste," from assimilated form of in- "into, in" (see in- (2)) + pasta "paste" (see pasta).
impatience (n.) Look up impatience at
c. 1200, from Old French impacience (Modern French impatience) and directly from Latin impatientia, from impatiens (see impatient).
impatient (adj.) Look up impatient at
late 14c., from Old French impacient (Modern French impatient), from Latin impatientem (nominative impatiens) "that cannot bear, intolerant, impatient," from assimilated form of in- "not, opposite of" (see in- (1)) + patiens (see patience). Related: Impatiently.
impeach (v.) Look up impeach at
late 14c., "to impede, hinder, prevent," from Anglo-French empecher, Old French empeechier "hinder" (12c., Modern French empêcher), from Late Latin impedicare "to fetter, catch, entangle," from assimilated form of in- "into, in" (see in- (2)) + Latin pedica "shackle," from pes (genitive pedis) "foot," from PIE root *ped- (1) "a foot" (see foot (n.)). Sense of "accuse a public officer of misconduct" first recorded 1560s, perhaps via confusion with Latin impetere "attack, accuse." Related: Impeached; impeaching.
impeachable (adj.) Look up impeachable at
c. 1500, from impeach + -able. Related: impeachably; impeachability.
impeachment (n.) Look up impeachment at
late 14c., enpechement "accusation, charge," from Old French empechement, from empeechier (see impeach). As a judicial proceeding against a public official, from 1640s.
impeccable (adj.) Look up impeccable at
1530s, "not capable of sin," from Middle French impeccable (15c.) or directly from Late Latin impeccabilis "not liable to sin," from assimilated form of in- "not, opposite of" (see in- (1)) + pecare "to sin," of unknown origin. Meaning "faultless" is from 1610s. Related: Impeccably.
impecunious (adj.) Look up impecunious at
"lacking in money," 1590s, from assimilated form of in- "not, opposite of" (see in- (1)) + Latin pecuniosus "rich," from pecunia "money, property" (see pecuniary). Related: Impecuniously; impecuniosity.
impedance (n.) Look up impedance at
1886, from impede + -ance. The classically correct formation would be *impedience.
impede (v.) Look up impede at
c. 1600, back-formation from impediment, or else from Latin impedire "impede, be in the way, hinder, detain," literally "to shackle the feet" (see impediment). Related: Impeded; impedes; impeding.
impediment (n.) Look up impediment at
c. 1400, from Latin impedimentem "hindrance," from impedire "impede," literally "to shackle the feet," from assimilated form of in- "into, in" (see in- (2)) + pes (genitive pedis) "foot," from PIE root *ped- (1) "a foot" (see foot (n.)).
impedimenta (n.) Look up impedimenta at
"traveling equipment," c. 1600, from Latin impedimenta "luggage, baggage," literally "that by which one is impeded;" plural of impedimentum (see impediment).
impel (v.) Look up impel at
early 15c., from Latin impellere "to push, strike against, drive forward, urge on," from assimilated form of in- "into, in, on, upon" (see in- (2)) + pellere "to push, drive" (see pulse (n.1)). Related: Impelled; impelling.
impeller (n.) Look up impeller at
1680s, agent noun from impel (v.). As a machine part from 1890.
impend (v.) Look up impend at
1590s, from figurative use of Latin impendere "to hang over, to be imminent," from assimilated form of in- "into, in, on, upon" (see in- (2)) + pendere "hang" (see pendant). Related: Impended; impending.
impendent Look up impendent at
1590s, from Latin impendens "impending," present participle of impendere (see impend).
impenetrable (adj.) Look up impenetrable at
mid-15c., from Middle French impenetrable, from Latin impenetrabilis "that cannot be penetrated," from assimilated form of in- "not, opposite of" (see in- (1)) + penetrabilis "penetrable" (see penetrate). Related: Impenetrably; impenetrability.
impenitence (n.) Look up impenitence at
1620s, from Latin impaenitentia, from impaenitens (see impenitent). Impenitency is from 1560s.
impenitent (adj.) Look up impenitent at
early 15c., from Latin impaenitentem, from assimilated form of in- "not, opposite of" (see in- (1)) + paenitens (see penitence).
imperative (adj.) Look up imperative at
1520s, from Late Latin imperativus "pertaining to a command," from imperatus "commanded," past participle of imperare "to command, to requisition," from assimilated form of in- "into, in" (see in- (2)) + parare "prepare" (see pare).
imperative (n.) Look up imperative at
mid-15c., in grammar; later "something imperative" (c. 1600), from Old French imperatif and directly from Late Latin imperativus (see imperative (adj.)).
imperator (n.) Look up imperator at
"commander-in-chief," Latin agent noun from stem of imperare "to command" (see imperative). In the Roman republic, a commander; in the Roman Empire, the emperor.
imperceptibility (n.) Look up imperceptibility at
1670s, from imperceptible + -ity.
imperceptible (adj.) Look up imperceptible at
early 15c., from French imperceptible (early 15c.), from Medieval Latin imperceptibilis, from assimilated form of in- "not, opposite of" (see in- (1)) + perceptibilis (see perceptible). Related: Imperceptibly. OED marks imperceivable as "Now rare."
imperfect (adj.) Look up imperfect at
mid-14c., imperfite, from Old French imparfait, from Latin imperfectus "unfinished, incomplete," from assimilated form of in- "not, opposite of" (see in- (1)) + perfectus (see perfect). Replaced mid-16c. by the Latin form. Related: Imperfectly.
imperfection (n.) Look up imperfection at
late 14c., from Old French imperfeccion (12c.) and directly from Late Latin imperfectionem (nominative imperfectio), from imperfectus (see imperfect).
imperforate (adj.) Look up imperforate at
1670s, from im- + perforate (adj.).
imperial (adj.) Look up imperial at
late 14c., "having a commanding quality," from Old French imperial (12c.), from Latin imperialis "of the empire or emperor," from imperium (see empire). Meaning "pertaining to an empire" (especially the Roman) is from late 14c. Imperial presidency in a U.S. context traces to Arthur Schlesinger Jr.'s book on the Nixon administration (1974). Related: Imperially.
imperialism (n.) Look up imperialism at
1826, "advocacy of empire," originally in a Napoleonic context, also of Rome and of British foreign policy, from imperial + -ism. At times in British usage (and briefly in U.S.) with a neutral or positive sense relating to national interests or the spread of the benefits of Western civilization, but from the begining usually more or less a term of reproach. General sense of "one country's rule over another," first recorded 1878. Picked up disparagingly in Communist jargon by 1918.
It is the old story of 1798, when French republicanism sick of its own folly and misdeeds, became metamorphosed into imperialism, and consoled itself for its incapacity to found domestic freedom by putting an iron yoke upon Europe, and covering it with blood and battle-fields. [Francis Lloyd, "St. James's Magazine," January 1842]
imperialist (n.) Look up imperialist at
c. 1600, "an adherent of an emperor," such as the emperor of Germany, France, China, etc., probably modeled on French impérialiste (early 16c.); from imperial + -ist. The shift in meaning to "advocate of imperialism" (1893) came via the British Empire, which involved a worldwide colonial system. See imperialism. As a term of abuse in communist circles, attested by 1918. As an adjective by 1816.
imperialistic (adj.) Look up imperialistic at
1872, from imperial + -istic. Also see imperialist.
imperil (v.) Look up imperil at
1590s, from assimilated form of in- "into, in" (see in- (2)) + peril. Related: Imperiled; imperiling.
imperious (adj.) Look up imperious at
1540s, from Latin imperiosus "commanding, mighty, powerful," from imperium "empire, command" (see empire). Related: Imperiously.
imperishable (adj.) Look up imperishable at
1640s, from assimilated form of in- "not, opposite of" (see in- (1)) + perishable.
imperium (n.) Look up imperium at
1650s, from Latin imperium "command, supreme authority, power" (see empire).
impermanence (n.) Look up impermanence at
1796, from impermanent + -ence. Impermanency is from 1640s.
impermanent (adj.) Look up impermanent at
1650s, from assimilated form of in- "not, opposite of" (see in- (1)) + permanent.
impermeable (adj.) Look up impermeable at
1690s, from French imperméable, from Late Latin impermeabilis, from assimilated form of in- "not, opposite of" (see in- (1)) + permeabilis (see permeable).
impermissible (adj.) Look up impermissible at
1814, from assimilated form of in- "not, opposite of" (see in- (1)) + permissible.
imperscriptable (adj.) Look up imperscriptable at
"unrecorded, without written authority," 1832, used only with right. From assimilated form of Latin in- "not, opposite of" (see in- (1)) + perscribere "to write down."
impersonal (adj.) Look up impersonal at
mid-15c., a grammatical term, from Late Latin impersonalis, from assimilated form of in- "not, opposite of" (see in- (1)) + personalis "personal" (see personal). Sense of "not connected with any person" is from 1620s; that of "not endowed with personality" is from 1842. Related: impersonally.
impersonality (n.) Look up impersonality at
1769, from impersonal + -ity.
impersonate (v.) Look up impersonate at
1620s, "to invest with a personality," from assimilated form of Latin in- "into, in" (see in- (2)) + persona "person." Sense of "to assume the person or character of" is first recorded 1715. Earlier in same sense was personate (1610s). Related: Impersonated; impersonating.
impersonation (n.) Look up impersonation at
1800, "personification;" 1825 as "an acting of a part or character;" noun of action from impersonate (v.).
impersonator (n.) Look up impersonator at
"one who assumes the person or character of another," 1853, from impersonate with Latinate agent noun suffix.
impertinence (n.) Look up impertinence at
c. 1600, from French impertinence, from Medieval Latin impertinentia, from Late Latin impertinentem "not belonging" (see impertinent). Impertinency is from 1580s.
impertinent (adj.) Look up impertinent at
late 14c., "unconnected, unrelated, not to the point," from Old French impertinent (14c.) or directly from Late Latin impertinentem (nominative impertinens) "not belonging," literally "not to the point," from assimilated form of Latin in- "not, opposite of" (see in- (1)) + pertinens (see pertinent). Sense of "rudely bold" is 1680s, from earlier sense of "not appropriate to the situation," probably modeled on similar use in French, especially by Molière, from notion of meddling with what is beyond one's proper sphere.
impertinently (adv.) Look up impertinently at
mid-15c., from impertinent + -ly (2).
imperturbable (adj.) Look up imperturbable at
c. 1500, from Middle French imperturbable and directly from Late Latin imperturbabilis "that cannot be disturbed" (Augustine), from assimilated form of in- "not, opposite of" (see in- (1)) + *perturbabilis, from Latin perturbare "to confuse, disturb" (see perturb). Related: Imperturbably; imperturbability.