limey (n.) Look up limey at Dictionary.com
1888, Australian, New Zealand, and South African slang for "English immigrant;" U.S. use is attested from 1918, originally "British sailor, British warship," short for lime-juicer (1857), in derisive reference to the British Navy's policy (begun 1795) of issuing lime (n.2) juice on ships to prevent scurvy among sailors. In U.S., extended to "any Englishman" by 1924.
Midway Signs Limey Prof to Dope Yank Talk ["Chicago Tribune" headline, Oct. 18, 1924]
liminal (adj.) Look up liminal at Dictionary.com
1884, from Latin limen "threshold, cross-piece, sill" (see limit (n.)) + -al (1). Related: Liminality.
limit (v.) Look up limit at Dictionary.com
late 14c., from Old French limiter "mark (a boundary), restrict; specify," from Latin limitare "to bound, limit, fix," from limes "boundary, limit" (see limit (n.)). Related: limited; limiting.
limit (n.) Look up limit at Dictionary.com
c. 1400, "boundary, frontier," from Old French limite "a boundary," from Latin limitem (nominative limes) "a boundary, limit, border, embankment between fields," related to limen "threshold." Originally of territory; general sense from early 15c. Colloquial sense of "the very extreme, the greatest degree imaginable" is from 1904.
limitary (adj.) Look up limitary at Dictionary.com
1610s, from Latin limitaris, from limes (genitive limitis); see limit (n.).
limitation (n.) Look up limitation at Dictionary.com
late 14c., from Old French limitacion and directly from Latin limitationem (nominative limitatio), noun of action from past participle stem of limitare (see limit (v.)). Phrase statute of limitations attested by 1768.
limited (adj.) Look up limited at Dictionary.com
1550s, past participle adjective from limit (v.); as a stand-alone for limited express train, by 1883. Limited edition is from 1920; limited monarchy from 1640s; limited war is from 1948. In British company names, Limited (abbrev. Ltd.), 1855, is short for limited liability company, one in which the liability of partners is limited, usually to the amount of their capital investment.
limitless (adj.) Look up limitless at Dictionary.com
1580s, from limit (n.) + -less. Related: Limitlessly; limitlessness.
limn (v.) Look up limn at Dictionary.com
early 15c., "to illuminate" (manuscripts), altered from Middle English luminen, "to illuminate manuscripts" (late 14c.), from Old French luminer "light up, illuminate," from Latin luminare "illuminate, burnish," from lumen (genitive luminis) "radiant energy, light," related to lucere "to shine" (see light (n.)). Sense of "portray, depict" first recorded 1590s. Related: Limned.
limnology (n.) Look up limnology at Dictionary.com
study of lakes and fresh water, 1892, with -logy + limno-, comb. form of Greek limne "pool of standing water, tidal pool, marsh, lake," from PIE root *(s)lei- "slime" (see slime (n.)). The science founded and the name probably coined by Swiss geologist François-Alphonse Forel (1841-1912). Related: Limnological; limnologist.
limo (n.) Look up limo at Dictionary.com
abbreviation of limousine, by 1959, American English.
Limoges (n.) Look up Limoges at Dictionary.com
painted porcelain or enamel from Limoges in France, 1838; for place name see Limousine.
limousine (n.) Look up limousine at Dictionary.com
1902, "enclosed automobile with open driver's seat," from French limousine, from Limousin, region in central France, originally an adjective referring to its chief city, Limoges, from Latin Lemovices, name of a people who lived near there, perhaps named in reference to their elm spears or bows. The Latin adjective form of the name, Lemovicinus, is the source of French Limousin.

Modern automobile meaning evolved from perceived similarity of the car's profile to a type of hood worn by the inhabitants of that province. Since 1930s, synonymous in American English with "luxury car;" applied from 1959 to vehicles that take people to and from large airports. Limousine liberal first attested 1969.
limp (v.) Look up limp at Dictionary.com
1560s, of unknown origin, perhaps related to Middle English lympen "to fall short" (c. 1400), which is probably from Old English lemphealt "halting, lame, limping," which has a lone cognate in the rare Middle High German limphin, and perhaps is from a PIE root meaning "slack, loose, to hang down" (cognates: Sanskrit lambate "hangs down," Middle High German lampen "to hang down"). Related: Limped; limping. As a noun, 1818, from the verb.
limp (adj.) Look up limp at Dictionary.com
1706, "flaccid, drooping," of obscure origin, perhaps related to limp (v.).
limpet (n.) Look up limpet at Dictionary.com
marine gastropod mollusk, early 14c., from Old English lempedu, from Medieval Latin lampreda "limpet" (see lamprey).
limpid (adj.) Look up limpid at Dictionary.com
c. 1600, from French limpide (15c.) and directly from Latin limpidus "clear," from limpa "water goddess, water;" probably cognate with lympha "clear liquid" (see lymph). Related: Limpidly.
limpidity (n.) Look up limpidity at Dictionary.com
1650s, from French limpidité or directly from Late Latin limpiditatem (nominative limpiditas) "clarity," from Latin limpidus (see limpid).
limy (adj.) Look up limy at Dictionary.com
resembling or coated with lime, 1550s, from lime (n.1) + -y (2).
linch (n.) Look up linch at Dictionary.com
early 14c., lins, from Old English lynis "linchpin," from Proto-Germanic *luniso (cognates: Old Saxon lunisa, Middle Dutch lunse, Dutch luns, German Lünse).
linchpin (n.) Look up linchpin at Dictionary.com
also linch-pin, late 14c., earlier linspin, from Middle English lins "axletree" (see linch) + pin (n.). The peg that holds a wheel on an axle; now mainly figurative.
Lincoln Look up Lincoln at Dictionary.com
English city, county town of Lincolnshire, Old English Lindcylene, from Latin Lindum Colonia from a Latinized form of British *lindo "pool, lake" (corresponding to Welsh llyn). Originally a station for retired IX Legion veterans. Lincoln green as a type of dyed cloth fabric made there is from c. 1500. In reference to U.S. president Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), Lincolnesque is from 1894 (earlierst reference is to the beard); Lincolniana is from (1862).
linden (n.) Look up linden at Dictionary.com
"the lime tree," 1570s, noun use of an adjective, "of linden wood," from Old English lind "linden" (n.), from Proto-Germanic *lindjo (cognates: Old Saxon linda, Old Norse lind, Old High German linta, German linde), probably from PIE *lent-o- "flexible" (see lithe); with reference to the tree's pliant bast. Compare Russian lutĭijó "forest of lime trees," Polish łęt "switch, twig," Lithuanian lenta "board, plank."
Lindy Hop (n.) Look up Lindy Hop at Dictionary.com
popular dance, 1931, it originated in Harlem, N.Y., named for Lindy, nickname of U.S. aviator Charles A. Lindbergh (1902-1974) who in 1927 made the first solo nonstop trans-Atlantic flight.
line (n.) Look up line at Dictionary.com
a Middle English merger of Old English line "cable, rope; series, row, row of letters; rule, direction," and Old French ligne "guideline, cord, string; lineage, descent;" both from Latin linea "linen thread, string, line," from phrase linea restis "linen cord," from fem. of lineus (adj.) "of linen," from linum "linen" (see linen).

Oldest sense is "rope, cord, string;" extended late 14c. to "a thread-like mark" (from sense "cord used by builders for making things level," mid-14c.), also "track, course, direction." Sense of "things or people arranged in a straight line" is from 1550s. That of "cord bearing hooks used in fishing" is from c. 1300. Meaning "one's occupation, branch of business" is from 1630s, probably from misunderstood KJV translation of 2 Cor. x:16, "And not to boast in another mans line of things made ready to our hand," where line translates Greek kanon, literally "measuring rod." Meaning "class of goods in stock" is from 1834. Meaning "telegraph wire" is from 1847 (later "telephone wire").

Meaning "policy or set of policies of a political faction" is 1892, American English, from notion of a procession of followers; this is the sense in party line. In British army, the Line (1802) is the regular, numbered troops, as distinguished from guards and auxiliaries. In the Navy (1704, as in ship of the line) it refers to the battle line. Lines "words of an actor's part" is from 1882. Lines of communication were originally transverse trenches in siegeworks.
line (v.1) Look up line at Dictionary.com
"to cover the inner side of," late 14c., from Old English lin "linen cloth" (see linen). Linen was frequently used in the Middle Ages as a second layer of material on the inner side of a garment. Related: Lined; lining.
line (v.2) Look up line at Dictionary.com
late 14c., "to tie with a cord," from line (n.). Meaning "to mark or mark off with lines" is from mid-15c. Sense of "to arrange in a line" is from 1640s; that of "to join a line" is by 1773. To line up "form a line" is attested by 1889, in U.S. football.
lineage (n.) Look up lineage at Dictionary.com
late 17c. alteration (by influence of line (n.)) of Middle English linage (c. 1300), from Old French lignage "descent, extraction, race," from ligne "line," from Latin linea "string, line, thread" (see line (n.)).
lineal (adj.) Look up lineal at Dictionary.com
late 14c., from Old French lineal (14c.), from Late Latin linealis "pertaining to a line," from linea (see line (n.)). Related: Lineally.
lineament (n.) Look up lineament at Dictionary.com
early 15c., "distinctive feature of the body, outline," from Middle French lineament, from Latin lineamentum "contour, outline," literally "a line, stroke, mark," from lineare "to reduce to a straight line," from linea (see line (n.)). Figurative sense of "a characteristic" is attested from 1630s.
linear (adj.) Look up linear at Dictionary.com
1640s, from French linéaire, from Latin linearis "belonging to a line," from linea "string, line" (see line (n.)). Essentially the same word as lineal; "in Latin linearis the original suffix -alis was dissimilated to -aris, but in Late Latin this rule was no longer productive and the formation or re-formation in -alis remained unchanged." [Barnhart]. Linear A and Linear B (1902-3) were names given to two related forms of linear Minoan writing discovered 1894-1901 in Crete by Sir Arthur Evans.
linearity (n.) Look up linearity at Dictionary.com
1748, from linear + -ity.
lineate (v.) Look up lineate at Dictionary.com
1550s, from Latin lineatus, past participle of lineare (see lineament). Related: Lineated; lineating.
lineate (adj.) Look up lineate at Dictionary.com
1640s, from Latin lineatus, past participle of lineare (see lineament).
lineation (n.) Look up lineation at Dictionary.com
late 14c., from Latin lineationem (nominative lineatio) "the making in a straight line," noun of action from past participle stem of lineare (see lineament).
lined (adj.) Look up lined at Dictionary.com
"having a lining or backing" (of some other material), mid-15c., from past participle of line (v.1); meaning "marked with lines" is from 1776, from past participle of line (v.2).
lineman (n.) Look up lineman at Dictionary.com
1858, worker on telegraph (later telephone) lines, from line (n.) + man (n.).
linen (n.) Look up linen at Dictionary.com
"cloth from woven flax," early 14c.; earlier as an adjective, "made of flax" (c. 1200), from Old English linin (adj.) "made of flax," from lin "flax, linen thread, cloth," from Proto-Germanic *linam (cognates: Old Saxon, Old Norse, Old High German lin "flax, linen," German Leinen "linen," Gothic lein "linen cloth"), probably an early borrowing from Latin linum "flax, linen," which, along with Greek linon is from a non-Indo-European language.
liner (n.1) Look up liner at Dictionary.com
"ship belonging to a shipping line," 1838, from line (n.) on notion of a succession of ships plying between ports along regular "lines." Line in this sense first attested 1786 in reference to stagecoaches. Cosmetics sense first recorded 1926, short for eye-liner. The type of baseball hit was so called from 1874 (line drive attested from 1899).
liner (n.2) Look up liner at Dictionary.com
"person who fits a lining to," 1610s, agent noun from line (v.1). Meaning "thing serving as a lining" is from 1869. Liner notes in a record album are attested from 1953.
linesman (n.) Look up linesman at Dictionary.com
1856, "soldier in a regiment of the line," from genitive of line (n.) + man (n.). Sports sense, in reference to umpires with specific duties in games with lines (originally tennis, also ice hockey) is from 1890.
lineup (n.) Look up lineup at Dictionary.com
also line-up, from line (v.2) + up. The baseball version (1889) is older than the police version (1907).
ling (n.) Look up ling at Dictionary.com
long, slender fish, c. 1300, common Germanic, cognate with Dutch leng, German Leng, Old Norse langa, probably ultimately related to long (adj.).
lingam (n.) Look up lingam at Dictionary.com
"phallic emblem under which Siva is worshipped," 1719, from Sanskrit linga (nominative lingam) "mark, token, sign, emblem," of unknown origin.
linger (v.) Look up linger at Dictionary.com
c. 1300, lenger "reside, dwell," northern England frequentative of lengen "to tarry," from Old English lengan "prolong, lengthen," from Proto-Germanic *langjan "to make long" (cognates: Old Frisian lendza, Old High German lengan, Dutch lengen "to lengthen"), source of Old English lang (see long (adj.)). Sense of "delay going, depart slowly and unwillingly" is from 1520s. Related: Lingered; lingering.
lingerie (n.) Look up lingerie at Dictionary.com
1835 (but not in widespread use until 1852), from French lingerie "things made of linen," also "laundry room, linen shop" (15c.), from Old French linge "linen" (12c.), from Latin lineus (adj.) "of linen," from linum "flax, linen" (see linen). Originally introduced in English as a euphemism for scandalous under-linen.
lingo (n.) Look up lingo at Dictionary.com
"foreign speech," 1650s, possibly a corrupt form of lingua franca (q.v.), or from Provençal lingo "language, tongue," from Old Provençal lenga, from Latin lingua "tongue" (see lingual).
lingua franca (n.) Look up lingua franca at Dictionary.com
1620s, from Italian, literally "Frankish tongue." Originally a form of communication used in the Levant, a stripped-down Italian peppered with Spanish, French, Greek, Arabic, and Turkish words. The name is probably from the Arabic custom, dating back to the Crusades, of calling all Europeans Franks (see Frank). Sometimes in 17c. English sources also known as Bastard Spanish.
lingual (adj.) Look up lingual at Dictionary.com
1640s, from Medieval Latin lingualis "of the tongue," from Latin lingua "tongue," also "speech, language," from Old Latin dingua, from PIE *dnghu- "tongue" (cognates: Old English tunge, Gothic tuggo "tongue;" see tongue). Altered in Latin probably in part by association with lingere "to lick."
linguine (n.) Look up linguine at Dictionary.com
1948, from Italian linguine, plural of linguina "little tongue," diminutive of lingua "tongue," from Latin lingua "tongue" (see lingual).