liturgical (adj.) Look up liturgical at Dictionary.com
1640s, from Late Latin liturgicus, from New Testament Greek leitourgikos "ministering," from leitourgos (see liturgy).
liturgy (n.) Look up liturgy at Dictionary.com
1550s, "the service of the Holy Eucharist," from Middle French liturgie or directly from Late Latin/Medieval Latin liturgia "public service, public worship," from Greek leitourgia "a liturgy; public duty, ministration, ministry," from leitourgos "one who performs a public ceremony or service, public servant," from leito- "public" (from laos "people;" compare leiton "public hall," leite "priestess;" see lay (adj.)) + -ergos "that works," from ergon "work" (see organ). Meaning "collective formulas for the conduct of divine service in Christian churches" is from 1590s.
Litvak (n.) Look up Litvak at Dictionary.com
"Jew from Lithuania," 1892, from Polish Litwak "Lithuanian Jew," originally simply "man from Lithuania."
livable (adj.) Look up livable at Dictionary.com
also liveable, 1610s, "likely to survive," from live (v.) + -able. Meaning "conducive to living" is from 1660s; sense of "suitable for living in" is from 1814 ("Mansfield Park"). Meaning "endurable" is from 1841.
live (v.) Look up live at Dictionary.com
Old English lifian (Anglian), libban (West Saxon) "to be, to live, have life; to experience," also "to supply oneself with food, to pass life (in some condition)," from Proto-Germanic *liben (source also of Old Norse lifa "to live, remain," Old Frisian libba, German leben, Gothic liban "to live"), from PIE root *leip- "to remain, continue" (source also of Greek liparein "to persist, persevere;" see leave). Meaning "to make a residence, dwell" is from c. 1200. Related: Lived; living.
According to the Dutch Prouerbe ... Leuen ende laetan leuen, To liue and to let others liue. [Malynes, 1622]
To live it up "live gaily and extravagantly" is from 1903. To live up to "act in accordance with" is 1690s, from earlier live up "live on a high (moral or mental) level" (1680s). To live (something) down "outwear (some slander or embarrassment)" is from 1842. To live with "cohabit as husband and wife" is attested from 1749; sense of "to put up with" is attested from 1937. Expression live and learn is attested from c. 1620.
live (adj.) Look up live at Dictionary.com
1540s, "having life," later (1610s) "burning, glowing," a shortening of alive (q.v.). Sense of "containing unspent energy or power" (live ammunition, etc.) is from 1799. Meaning "in-person" (of performance) is first attested 1934. Live wire is attested from 1890; figurative sense of "active person" is from 1903.
live-in (adj.) Look up live-in at Dictionary.com
"residing on the premises," 1950, from live (v.) + in. Lived-in "inhabited, occupied" is first recorded 1873.
livelihood (n.) Look up livelihood at Dictionary.com
1610s, alteration of livelode "means of keeping alive" (c. 1300), from Old English lifad "course of life," from lif "life" + lad "way, course" (see load). Similar formation in Old High German libleita. Spelling assimilated to words in -hood. Earlier livelihood was a different word, meaning "liveliness," from lively.
livelily (adv.) Look up livelily at Dictionary.com
1550s, from lively + -ly (2).
livelong (adj.) Look up livelong at Dictionary.com
also live-long, c. 1400, lefe longe (day), from leve, lief "dear" (see lief), used here as an emotional intensive + long (adj). From late 16c. conformed in spelling to live (v.) as lief grew strange. German has cognate die liebe lange Nacht, literally "the dear long night."
lively (adj.) Look up lively at Dictionary.com
Old English liflic "living, existing," literally "life-like;" from life + -ly (2). Sense of "active, energetic" developed by early 13c., from notion "full of life."
liven (v.) Look up liven at Dictionary.com
1884, colloquial shortening of 17c. enliven, usually with up. Related: Livened; livening.
liver (n.2) Look up liver at Dictionary.com
"one who lives (in a particular way)," late 14c., agent noun from live (v.).
liver (n.1) Look up liver at Dictionary.com
secreting organ of the body, Old English lifer, from Proto-Germanic *librn (source also of Old Norse lifr, Old Frisian livere, Middle Dutch levere, Dutch lever, Old High German lebara, German Leber "liver"), perhaps from PIE *leip- "to stick adhere; fat" (see leave (v.)). Formerly believed to be the body's blood-producing organ; in medieval times it rivaled the heart as the supposed seat of love and passion, hence lily-livered. Liver-spots, once thought to be caused by a dysfunction of the organ, is attested from 1730.
Liverpool Look up Liverpool at Dictionary.com
English city on the River Mersey, Liuerpul (c.1190) "Pool with Muddy Water," from Old English lifer "thick, clotted water" + pol (see pool (n.1)). "The original reference was to a pool or tidal creek now filled up into which two streams drained" [Victor Watts, "Cambridge Dictionary of English Place-Names," 2004]. The adjective and noun Liverpudlian (with jocular substitution of puddle for pool) is attested from 1833.
liverwort (n.) Look up liverwort at Dictionary.com
late Old English lifenwyrt, from lifer (see liver (n.1)) + wyrt (see wort). A loan-translation of Medieval Latin hepatica. Applied to various plants with liver-shaped leaves or that were used to treat liver disorders. Similar formation in German leberkraut.
liverwurst (n.) Look up liverwurst at Dictionary.com
1869, American English, partial translation of German Leberwurst, from Leber "liver" (see liver (n.1)) + Wurst "sausage" (see wurst).
livery (n.) Look up livery at Dictionary.com
c. 1300, "household allowance of any kind (food, provisions, clothing) to retainers or servants," from Anglo-French livere (late 13c.), Old French livrée, "allowance, ration, pay," originally "(clothes) delivered by a master to his retinue," from fem. past participle of livrer "to dispense, deliver, hand over," from Latin liberare (see liberate). The sense later was reduced to "servants' rations" and "provender for horses" (mid-15c.). The former led to the meaning "distinctive clothing given to servants" (early 14c.); the latter now is obsolete except in livery stable (1705). Related: Liveried.
livestock (n.) Look up livestock at Dictionary.com
1520s, from live (adj.) + stock (n.2).
liveware (n.) Look up liveware at Dictionary.com
"people," 1966, computer-programmer jargon, from live (adj.) + ending abstracted from software, etc.
livid (adj.) Look up livid at Dictionary.com
early 15c., "of a bluish-leaden color," from Middle French livide and directly from Latin lividus "of a bluish color, black and blue," figuratively "envious, spiteful, malicious," from livere "be bluish," earlier *slivere, from PIE *sliwo-, suffixed form of root *(s)leie- "bluish" (source also of Old Church Slavonic and Russian sliva "plum;" Lithuanian slywas "plum;" Old Irish li, Welsh lliw "color, splendor," Old English sla "sloe"). The sense of "furiously angry" (1912) is from the notion of being livid with rage.
living (adj.) Look up living at Dictionary.com
"alive," also "residing, staying," c. 1200, from present participle of live (v.)).
living (n.) Look up living at Dictionary.com
"living persons," late Old English; early 14c. as "the fact of dwelling in some place," from Old English lifiende "that lives or has life," present participle of lifan (see live (v.)). The meaning "action, process, or method of gaining one's livelihood" is attested from c. 1400.
living room (n.) Look up living room at Dictionary.com
"room set up for ordinary social use," 1795 (as opposed to bedroom, dining room, etc.); from living (n.) + room (n.).
livre (n.) Look up livre at Dictionary.com
former French money, 1550s, from French livre "pound," in Old French in both the weight and money senses, from Latin libra "pound (unit of weight);" see Libra. The monetary sense in Latin was in the derived libella "small silver coin." Equivalent to the 20c. franc, the livre was made up of 20 sous.
lixiviate (v.) Look up lixiviate at Dictionary.com
1758, from past participle stem of Modern Latin lixiviare, from Latin lixivium, neuter of lixivius "made into lye," from lix "ashes, lye."
lizard (n.) Look up lizard at Dictionary.com
"an animal resembling a serpent, with legs added to it" [Johnson], late 14c., lusarde, from Anglo-French lusard, Old French laisarde "lizard" (Modern French lézard), from Latin lacertus (fem. lacerta) "lizard," of unknown origin, perhaps from PIE root *leq- "to bend, twist" [Klein].
Lizzie Look up Lizzie at Dictionary.com
pet form of fem. proper name Elizabeth, used colloquially for "a motor car" (especially an early-model Ford) from 1913; also tin lizzie.
llama (n.) Look up llama at Dictionary.com
woolly-haired South American ruminant, c. 1600, from Spanish llama (1535), from Quechua (Peru) llama.
Llanfair Look up Llanfair at Dictionary.com
common in Welsh place names, literally "St. Mary's Church," from Welsh llan "church" (see land (n.)) + Mair "Mary," with lentition of m- to f-.
llano (n.) Look up llano at Dictionary.com
1610s, American Spanish, "prairie," from Spanish llano "plain, even, level, smooth," ultimately from Latin planum "plain," from planus "smooth" (see plane (n.1)). Hence, llanero "a Latin-American cowboy" (1819), literally "plainsman."
LLC Look up LLC at Dictionary.com
abbreviation of Limited Liability Company (see limited).
Llewelyn Look up Llewelyn at Dictionary.com
male proper name, from Welsh Llywelin, often explained as "lion-like," but probably from llyw "leader."
Lloyd Look up Lloyd at Dictionary.com
male proper name, from Welsh Llwyd, literally "gray," from PIE *pel- (2) "pale" (see pallor). Lloyd's, meaning the London-based association of marine underwriters, is first recorded as such 1805, from Lloyd's Coffee House, Tower Street, London, opened in 1688 by Edward Lloyd, who supplied shipping information to his patrons.
LMAO Look up LMAO at Dictionary.com
by 1997, online abbreviation of laughing my ass off. Related: LMFAO (by 2000).
lo (interj.) Look up lo at Dictionary.com
early 13c., from Old English la, exclamation of surprise, grief, or joy; influenced in Middle English by lo!, short for lok "look!" imperative of loken "to look" (see look (v.)). Expression lo and behold attested by 1779.
loach (n.) Look up loach at Dictionary.com
small edible European fish, mid-14c., from Old French loche (13c.), also, in dialect, "slug," of unknown origin (see discussion in Gamillscheg).
load (v.) Look up load at Dictionary.com
late 15c., "to place in or on a vehicle," from load (n.). Transitive sense of "to put a load in or on" is from c. 1500; of firearms from 1620s. Of a vehicle, "to fill with passengers," from 1832. Related: Loaded; loaden (obs.); loading.
load (n.) Look up load at Dictionary.com
"that which is laid upon a person or beast, burden," c. 1200, from Old English lad "way, course, carrying," from Proto-Germanic *laitho (source also of Old High German leita, German leite, Old Norse leið "way, course"); related to Old English lædan "to guide," from PIE root *leit- (2) "to go forth" (see lead (v.1)). Sense shifted 13c. to supplant words based on lade, to which it is not etymologically connected; original association with "guide" is preserved in lodestone. Meaning "amount customarily loaded at one time" is from c. 1300.

Figurative sense of "burden weighing on the mind, heart, or soul" is first attested 1590s. Meaning "amount of work" is from 1946. Colloquial loads "lots, heaps" is attested from c. 1600. Phrase take a load off (one's) feet "sit down, relax" is from 1914, American English. Get a load of "take a look at" is American English colloquial, attested from 1929.
loaded (adj.) Look up loaded at Dictionary.com
"drunk," slang, 1886, from past participle of load (v.), from expression take one's load "drink one's fill" (1590s). In the sense of "rich," loaded is attested from 1910.
loader (n.) Look up loader at Dictionary.com
late 15c., "person who loads," agent noun from load (v.). Of machinery, by 1862.
loaf (n.) Look up loaf at Dictionary.com
late 13c., from Old English hlaf "portion of bread baked in a mass of definite form," from Proto-Germanic *khlaibuz (source also of Old Norse hleifr, Swedish lev, Old Frisian hlef, Old High German hleib, German Laib, Gothic hlaifs "bread, loaf"), of uncertain origin, perhaps connected to Old English hlifian "to raise higher, tower," on the notion of the bread rising as it bakes, but it is unclear whether "loaf" or "bread" is the original sense. Finnish leipä, Old Church Slavonic chlebu, Lithuanian klepas probably are Germanic loan words. Meaning "chopped meat shaped like a bread loaf" is attested from 1787.
loaf (v.) Look up loaf at Dictionary.com
1835, American English, back-formation from loafer (1830). Related: Loafed; loafing.
The term "loafing" is, of course, very vague. Its meaning, like that of its opposite, "work," depends largely on the user. The highly successful quarterback with an E in Greek is a loafer in his professor's eyes, while the idea of the professor's working, in spite of his voluminous researches on Mycenean Table Manners, would excite hoots of derision from the laborer that lays the drains before his study window. [Yale Literary Magazine, May 1908]
loafer (n.) Look up loafer at Dictionary.com
"idler, person who loafs," 1830, of uncertain origin, often regarded as a variant of land loper (1795), a partial loan-translation of German Landläufer "vagabond," from Land "land" + Läufer "runner," from laufen "to run" (see leap (v.)). But OED finds this connection "not very probable." As a type of shoe, 1937. Related: Loafers.
loam (n.) Look up loam at Dictionary.com
Old English lam "clay, mud, mire, earth," from Proto-Germanic *laimaz (source also of Old Saxon lemo, Dutch leem, German Lehm "loam"), from PIE root *(s)lei- "slimy" (see slime (n.)). As a type of highly fertile clayey soil, it is attested from 1660s. As a verb from c. 1600.
loan (n.) Look up loan at Dictionary.com
mid-13c., from Old Norse lan, related to lja "to lend," from Proto-Germanic *laikhwniz (source also of Old Frisian len "thing lent," Middle Dutch lene, Dutch leen "loan, fief," Old High German lehan, German Lehn "fief, feudal tenure"), originally "to let have, to leave (to someone)," from PIE *leikw- "to leave" (see relinquish).

The Norse word also is cognate with Old English læn "gift," which did not survive into Middle English, but its derived verb lænan is the source of lend (v.). As a verb, loan is attested from 1540s, perhaps earlier, and formerly was current, but has now been supplanted in England by lend, though it survives in American English.

Loan word (1874) is a translation of German Lehnwort; loan-translation "word or phrase that has been translated literally from another language and which keeps its original connotation" is attested by 1933, from German Lehnübersetzung. Slang loan shark first attested 1900.
loaner (n.) Look up loaner at Dictionary.com
1884, "one who lends," agent noun from loan (v.). Meaning "a thing loaned" especially in place of one being repaired, is from 1926.
loath (adj.) Look up loath at Dictionary.com
Old English lað "hated; hateful; hostile; repulsive," from Proto-Germanic *laithaz (source also of Old Saxon, Old Frisian leth "loathsome," Old Norse leiðr "hateful, hostile, loathed;" Middle Dutch lelijc, Dutch leelijk "ugly;" Old High German leid "sorrowful, hateful, offensive, grievous," German Leid "sorrow"), from PIE root *leit- (1) "to detest."

Weakened meaning "averse, disinclined" is attested from late 14c. Loath to depart, a line from some long-forgotten song, is recorded since 1580s as a generic term expressive of any tune played at farewells, the sailing of a ship, etc. Related: Loathness. French laid "ugly" is from the same source, via Frankish *laid or another Germanic word.
loathe (v.) Look up loathe at Dictionary.com
Old English laðian "to hate, to be disgusted with," from lað "hostile" (see loath). Cognate with Old Saxon lethon, Old Norse leiða. Related: Loathed; loathing.
loathing (n.) Look up loathing at Dictionary.com
"abhorrence," mid-14c., verbal noun from loathe.