loathly (adj.) Look up loathly at Dictionary.com
Old English laðlic "hateful, horrible, unpleasant;" see loath + -ly (2). As an adverb, Old English laðlice.
loathsome (adj.) Look up loathsome at Dictionary.com
c. 1300, "foul, detestable," from loath in its older, stronger sense + -some (1). Related: Loathsomely; loathsomeness.
lob (v.) Look up lob at Dictionary.com
"send up in a slow, high arc," 1824 (implied in lobbing), but the word existed 16c. in various senses suggesting heavy, pendant, or floppy things, and probably is ultimately from an unrecorded Old English word; compare East Frisian lobbe "hanging lump of flesh," Dutch lob "hanging lip, ruffle, hanging sleeve," Danish lobbes "clown, bumpkin." Related: Lobbed; lobbing. The noun in this sense is from 1875, from the verb.
lob (n.) Look up lob at Dictionary.com
a word of widespread application to lumpish things, probably in Old English. Compare Middle Dutch, Middle Low German lobbe, Old Norse lubba. From late 13c. as a surname; meaning "pollack" is from early 14c.; that of "lazy lout" is from late 14c.
lobate (adj.) Look up lobate at Dictionary.com
"having lobes," 1760, from Modern Latin lobatus, from lobus (see lobe).
lobby (n.) Look up lobby at Dictionary.com
1530s, "cloister, covered walk," from Medieval Latin laubia, lobia "covered walk in a monastery," from a Germanic source (compare Old High German louba "hall, roof;" see lodge (n.)). Meaning "large entrance hall in a public building" is from 1590s. Political sense of "those who seek to influence legislation" is attested by 1790s in American English, in reference to the custom of influence-seekers gathering in large entrance-halls outside legislative chambers.
lobby (v.) Look up lobby at Dictionary.com
"seek to influence legislation," 1826, American English, from lobby (n.). Related: Lobbied; lobbying.
lobbyist (n.) Look up lobbyist at Dictionary.com
1863, American English, from lobby (n.) in the political sense + -ist.
[A] strong lobbyist will permit himself to lose heavily at the poker-table, under the assumption that the great Congressman who wins the stake will look leniently upon the little appropriation he means to ask for. [George A. Townsend, "Events at the National Capital and the Campaign of 1876," Hartford, Conn., 1876]
lobe (n.) Look up lobe at Dictionary.com
early 15c., "a lobe of the liver or lungs," from Middle French lobe and directly from Medieval Latin lobus, from Late Latin lobus "hull, husk, pod," from Greek lobos "lobe of the ear, vegetable pod," perhaps related to Greek leberis "husk of fruits," from PIE *logwos. Extended 1670s to divisions of the brain.
loblolly (n.) Look up loblolly at Dictionary.com
"thick gruel," 1590s, probably from lob, imitative of bubbling and boiling + lolly, obsolete Devonshire dialect word for "broth, soup, food boiled in a pot."
lobo (n.) Look up lobo at Dictionary.com
wolf of the U.S. southwest, 1859, from Spanish lobo, from Latin lupus (see wolf).
lobotomize (v.) Look up lobotomize at Dictionary.com
1943; see lobotomy + -ize. Related: Lobotomized.
lobotomy (n.) Look up lobotomy at Dictionary.com
1936, coined from lobe (in the brain sense) + medical suffix -tomy. Figurative use is attested from 1953.
Now I guess I'll have to tell 'em
That I got no cerebellum
[Ramones, "Teenage Lobotomy," 1977]
lobster (n.) Look up lobster at Dictionary.com
marine shellfish, Old English loppestre "lobster, locust," corruption of Latin locusta, lucusta "lobster, locust," by influence of Old English loppe "spider," a variant of lobbe. The ending of Old English loppestre is the fem. agent noun suffix (as in Baxter, Webster; see -ster), which approximated the Latin sound.

Perhaps a transferred use of the Latin word; trilobite fossils in Worcestershire limestone quarries were known colloquially as locusts, which seems to be the generic word for "unidentified arthropod," as apple is for "foreign fruit." OED says the Latin word originally meant "lobster or some similar crustacean, the application to the locust being suggested by the resemblance in shape." Locusta in the sense "lobster" also appears in Old Cornish legast and French langouste, now "crawfish, crayfish," but in Old French both "lobster" and "locust" (a 13c. psalter has God giving over the crops of Egypt to the langoustes). As slang for "a British soldier" since 1640s, originally in reference to the jointed armor of the Roundhead cuirassiers, later (1660) to the red coat.
Sir William Waller having received from London [in June 1643] a fresh regiment of five hundred horse, under the command of sir Arthur Haslerigge, which were so prodigiously armed that they were called by the other side the regiment of lobsters, because of their bright iron shells with which they were covered, being perfect curasseers. [Clarendon, "History of the Rebellion," 1647]
loc. cit. Look up loc. cit. at Dictionary.com
1854, abbreviation of Latin loco citato or locus citatus "in the place cited;" hence, "in the book that has been previously quoted."
locable (adj.) Look up locable at Dictionary.com
1816, from Latin locare "to place" (see locate) + -able. Alternative formation locatable is attested from 1838.
local (adj.) Look up local at Dictionary.com
"pertaining to position," late 14c. (originally medical, "confined to a particular part of the body"), from Old French local (13c.) and directly from Late Latin localis "pertaining to a place," from Latin locus "place" (see locus). The meaning "limited to a particular place" is from c. 1500. Local color is from 1721, originally a term in painting; meaning "anything picturesque" is from c. 1900.
local (n.) Look up local at Dictionary.com
early 15c., "a medicament applied to a particular part of the body," from local (adj.). Meaning "inhabitant of a particular locality" is from 1825. The meaning "a local train" is from 1879; "local branch of a trade union" is from 1888; "neighborhood pub" is from 1934.
locale (n.) Look up locale at Dictionary.com
1772, local, from French local, noun use of local (adj.), from Latin locus "place" (see locus). English spelling with -e (1816) probably is based on morale or else to indicate stress.
The word's right to exist depends upon the question whether the two indispensable words locality & scene give all the shades of meaning required, or whether something intermediate is useful. [Fowler]
localism (n.) Look up localism at Dictionary.com
"attachment to a particular locality," 1803, from local (adj.) + -ism. Meaning "something characteristic of a particular locality" is from 1823.
localist (n.) Look up localist at Dictionary.com
1680s, from local (adj.) + -ist. Related: Localistic.
localitis (n.) Look up localitis at Dictionary.com
"obsession with the problems of one's locality and consequent failure to see big pictures," 1943, from local (adj.) + transferred use of medical suffix -itis.
locality (n.) Look up locality at Dictionary.com
1620s, "fact of having a place," from French localité, from Late Latin localitatem (nominative localitas) "locality," from localis "belonging to a place" (see local). Meaning "a place or district" is from 1830.
localization (n.) Look up localization at Dictionary.com
1811, noun of action from localize.
localize (v.) Look up localize at Dictionary.com
1792, from local + -ize. Related: Localized; localizing.
locally (adv.) Look up locally at Dictionary.com
mid-15c., from local (adj.) + -ly (2).
locate (v.) Look up locate at Dictionary.com
1650s, "to establish oneself in a place, settle," from Latin locatus, past participle of locare "to place, put, set, dispose, arrange," from locus "a place" (see locus). Sense of "mark the limits of a place" (especially a land grant) is attested from 1739 in American English; this developed to "establish (something) in a place" (1807) and "to find out the place of" (1882, American English). Related: Located; locating.
location (n.) Look up location at Dictionary.com
"position, place," 1590s, from Latin locationem (nominative locatio), noun of action from past participle stem of locare (see locate); Hollywood sense of "place outside a film studio where a scene is filmed" is from 1914.
locative (n.) Look up locative at Dictionary.com
"grammatical case indicating place," 1804, from Latin locus "place" (see locus) on model of Latin vocativus "vocative," from vocatus, past participle of vocare "to call, summon." As an adjective by 1816.
locator (n.) Look up locator at Dictionary.com
c. 1600, of persons, from Latin locator, agent noun from locare (see locate). Of things which locate, from 1902.
locavore (n.) Look up locavore at Dictionary.com
one who eats only locally grown or raised food, by 2001, from local + ending abstracted from carnivore, etc., ultimately from Latin vorare "to devour" (see voracity).
loch (n.) Look up loch at Dictionary.com
late 14c., from Gaelic loch "lake, narrow arm of the sea," cognate with Old Irish loch "body of water, lake," Breton lagen, Anglo-Irish lough, Latin lacus (see lake (n.1)). The Loch Ness monster is first attested 1933.
lochia (n.) Look up lochia at Dictionary.com
"discharge from the uterus after childbirth," 1680s, Modern Latin, from Greek lokhia, neuter plural of lokhios "pertaining to childbirth," from lokhos "a lying in, childbirth," also, "an ambush," from PIE root *legh- "to lie, lay" (see lie (v.2)).
lock (n.1) Look up lock at Dictionary.com
"means of fastening," Old English loc "bolt, fastening; barrier, enclosure," from Proto-Germanic *lukan (source also of Old Norse lok "fastening, lock," Gothic usluks "opening," Old High German loh "dungeon," German Loch "opening, hole," Dutch luik "shutter, trapdoor"). "The great diversity of meaning in the Teut. words seems to indicate two or more independent but formally identical substantival formations from the root."

The Old English sense "barrier, enclosure" led to the specific meaning "barrier on a river" (c. 1300), and the more specific sense "gate and sluice system on a water channel used as a means of raising and lowering boats" (1570s). Wrestling sense is from c. 1600. Phrase under lock and key attested from early 14c.
lock (n.2) Look up lock at Dictionary.com
"tress of hair," Old English locc "lock of hair, curl," from Proto-Germanic *lukkoz (source also of Old Norse lokkr, Old Saxon, Old Frisian, Dutch lok, Old High German loc, German Locke "lock of hair"), from PIE *lugnos-, perhaps related to Greek lygos "pliant twig, withe," Lithuanian lugnas "flexible."
lock (v.) Look up lock at Dictionary.com
"to fasten with a lock," c. 1300, from Old English lucan "to lock, to close" (class II strong verb; past tense leac, past participle locen), from the same root as lock (n.1). Cognate with Old Frisian luka "to close," Old Saxon lukan, Old High German luhhan, Old Norse luka, Gothic galukan. Meaning "to embrace closely" is from 1610s. Related: Locked; locking. Slang lock horns "fight" is from 1839.
lock-jaw (n.) Look up lock-jaw at Dictionary.com
also lockjaw, 1786, earlier locked-jaw (1765), popular name for trismus, also applied to tetanus, from lock (v.) + jaw.
lock-step (n.) Look up lock-step at Dictionary.com
1802, in military writing, for a very tight style of mass marching, from lock (n.) + step (n.).
Lock-step. A mode of marching by a body of men going one after another as closely as possible, in which the leg of each moves at the same time with and closely follows the corresponding leg of the person directly before him. [Thomas Wilhelm, "Military Dictionary and Gazetteer," Philadelphia, 1881]
Figurative use by 1836.
lock-up (n.) Look up lock-up at Dictionary.com
"detention cell for offenders," 1838, perhaps short for earlier lock-up house; from lock (v.) + up. Meaning "action of locking up" is from 1845. The verbal phrase lock up is recorded from early 15c.
lockable (adj.) Look up lockable at Dictionary.com
1832, from lock (v.) + -able. Related: Lockability.
lockdown (n.) Look up lockdown at Dictionary.com
also lock-down, from 1940s in various mechanical senses, from lock (v.) + down (adv.). Prison sense is by 1975, American English.
locker (n.) Look up locker at Dictionary.com
small chest that can be locked, late 14c., agent noun from Middle English lokken (see lock (v.)). Earlier "a mechanism for locking" (early 14c.).
locket (n.) Look up locket at Dictionary.com
mid-14c., "iron cross-bar of a window," from Old French loquet "door-handle, bolt, latch," diminutive of loc "lock, latch," from Frankish or some other Germanic source (compare Old Norse lok "fastening, lock;" see lock (n.1)). Meaning "ornamental case with hinged cover" (containing a lock of hair, miniature portrait, etc.) first recorded 1670s.
lockout (n.) Look up lockout at Dictionary.com
also lock-out, "act of locking out workers," 1854, from lock (v.) + out.
locksmith (n.) Look up locksmith at Dictionary.com
early 13c., from lock (n.1) + smith.
loco (adj.) Look up loco at Dictionary.com
1844, American English, from Spanish loco (adj.) "insane," of uncertain origin, perhaps from Arabic lauqa, fem. of 'alwaq "fool, crazy person." Loco-weed (1877) was name given to species of western U.S. plants that cause cattle and horse diseases that make them stagger and act strangely.
loco- Look up loco- at Dictionary.com
word-forming element meaning "from place to place," from comb. form of Latin locus (see locus).
loco-foco (n.) Look up loco-foco at Dictionary.com
"self-igniting cigar or match," 1839 (but presumably older), American English, of unknown origin, perhaps from a misapprehension of the meaning of the first element of locomotive as "self-" + Spanish fuego "fire." During one heated political meeting in N.Y., the lights went out and the delegates used such matches to relight them, thence the name loco-foco entered U.S. political jargon (1837), usually applied to a radical faction of the Democratic Party, but by the Whigs applied to all Democrats.
locomote (v.) Look up locomote at Dictionary.com
1831, back-formation from locomotion.
locomotion (n.) Look up locomotion at Dictionary.com
1640s, formed in English from Latin loco "from a place" (ablative of locus "place") + motionem (nominative motio) "motion, a moving."