loose-leaf (adj.) Look up loose-leaf at Dictionary.com
1899, from loose (adj.) + leaf (n.).
loosely (adv.) Look up loosely at Dictionary.com
late 14c., from loose + -ly (2).
loosen (v.) Look up loosen at Dictionary.com
late 14c., losnen, later lousen (early 15c.), from loose (v.) + -en (1). Related: Loosened; loosening.
looseness (n.) Look up looseness at Dictionary.com
c. 1400, from loose + -ness.
loot (n.) Look up loot at Dictionary.com
"goods taken from an enemy, etc.," 1788, Anglo-Indian, from Hindi lut, from Sanskrit loptram, lotram "booty, stolen property," from PIE *roup-tro-, from root *reup- "to snatch" (see rip (v.)). The verb is first attested 1821, from the noun. Related: Looted; looting.
looter (n.) Look up looter at Dictionary.com
1858, agent noun from loot (v.).
looting (n.) Look up looting at Dictionary.com
1842, verbal noun from loot (v.).
lop (v.1) Look up lop at Dictionary.com
"cut off," 1510s, from Middle English loppe (n.) "small branches and twigs trimmed from trees" (early 15c.), of unknown origin. Related: Lopped (mid-15c.); lopping. Place name Loppedthorn is attested from 1287.
lop (v.2) Look up lop at Dictionary.com
"droop, hang loosely," 1570s, probably a variant of lob or of lap (v.); compare lopsided (1711), originally lapsided, first used of ships. Lop-eared attested from 1680s. Related: Lopped; lopping.
lope (v.) Look up lope at Dictionary.com
"to run with long strides," early 15c.; earlier "to leap, jump, spring" (c. 1300), from Old Norse hlaupa "to run, leap," from Proto-Germanic *hlaupan (see leap (v.)). Related: Loped; loping. The noun meaning "a jump, a leap" is from late 14c.; sense of "long, bounding stride" is from 1809.
lopsided (adj.) Look up lopsided at Dictionary.com
also lop-sided, 1711, originally lapsided, first used of ships; from lop (v.2) + side (n.). Related: Lopsidedly; lopsidedness.
loquacious (adj.) Look up loquacious at Dictionary.com
1660s, back-formation from loquacity or else formed from stem of Latin loquax (genitive loquacis) "talkative," from loqui "to speak" (see locution) + -ous. Related: Loquaciously; loquaciousness.
loquacity (n.) Look up loquacity at Dictionary.com
c. 1200, from Latin loquacitatem (nominative loquacitas) "talkativeness," from loquax "talkative" (see loquacious). An Old English word for it was ofersprecolnes.
loquat (n.) Look up loquat at Dictionary.com
1820, from Cantonese luh kwat, literally "rush orange."
loquitur Look up loquitur at Dictionary.com
stage direction, "he or she speaks," Latin, third person present indicative singular of loqui "to talk" (see locution).
loran (n.) Look up loran at Dictionary.com
1940, a word invented from initial letters in long-range navigation.
lord (n.) Look up lord at Dictionary.com
mid-13c., laverd, loverd, from Old English hlaford "master of a household, ruler, superior," also "God" (translating Latin Dominus, though Old English drihten was used more often), earlier hlafweard, literally "one who guards the loaves," from hlaf "bread, loaf" (see loaf (n.)) + weard "keeper, guardian" (see ward (n.)). Compare lady (literally "bread-kneader"), and Old English hlafæta "household servant," literally "loaf-eater." Modern monosyllabic form emerged 14c. As an interjection from late 14c. Lord's Prayer is from 1540s. Lord of the Flies translates Beelzebub (q.v.) and was name of 1954 book by William Golding. To drink like a lord is from 1620s.
lord (v.) Look up lord at Dictionary.com
c. 1300, "to exercise lordship," from lord (n.). Meaning "to play the lord, domineer" is late 14c. Related: Lorded; lording. To lord it is from 1570s.
Lord's Look up Lord's at Dictionary.com
cricket grounds in London, named for founder Thomas Lord (1757-1832).
lordly (adj.) Look up lordly at Dictionary.com
14c., from Old English hlafordlic "lordly, noble;" see lord (n.) + -ly (1). As an adverb from mid-14c.
lordosis (n.) Look up lordosis at Dictionary.com
curvature of the spine, 1704, Modern Latin, from Greek lordosis, from lordos "bent backwards." Related: Lordotic.
lordship (n.) Look up lordship at Dictionary.com
c. 1300, from Old English hlafordscipe "authority, rule" (translating Latin dominatio); see lord (n.) + -ship.
Lordy (interj.) Look up Lordy at Dictionary.com
1832, in imitation of African-American vernacular; extended form of Lord as an interjection.
lore (n.) Look up lore at Dictionary.com
Old English lar "learning, what is taught, knowledge, science, doctrine, art of teaching," from Proto-Germanic *laizo (Old Saxon lera, Old Frisian lare, Middle Dutch lere, Dutch leer, Old High German lera, German Lehre "teaching, precept, doctrine"), from PIE *leis- (1) "track, furrow" (see learn).
Lorelei Look up Lorelei at Dictionary.com
1843, from German, name of a rock in the River Rhine near Koblenz, Germany. In legend, a lovely woman sat atop it and sang while combing her long blond hair, distracting sailors so their ships foundered on the rock and they drowned. The second element of the name probably is Rhenish dialect lei "cliff, rock;" the first element is perhaps from Middle High German lüren "to lie in wait"
lorgnette (n.) Look up lorgnette at Dictionary.com
"opera glass with a handle," 1803 (from 1776 as a French word in English), from French lorgnette, from lorgner "to squint," also "to leer at, oogle" (16c.), from lorgne "squinting," of uncertain origin. With diminutive suffix -ette. Compare also French lorgnon "eyeglass, eyeglasses."
lorimer (n.) Look up lorimer at Dictionary.com
c. 1200 (mid-12c. as surname), "maker of bits for bridles and saddles, worker in small ironware," from Old French loremier "saddler, harness-maker, military leatherworker" (Modern French lormier), from loraim, from Latin lorum "strap, thong, rein of a bridle," from PIE root *wel- (3) "to turn" (see volvox).
loris (n.) Look up loris at Dictionary.com
small primate of Sri Lanka, 1774, from French loris (Buffon), of unknown origin, said to be from obsolete Dutch loeris "booby, clown."
lorn (adj.) Look up lorn at Dictionary.com
(archaic) c. 1300, "lost, ruined," from Old English loren, past participle of leosan "to lose" (see lose). Meaning "abandoned, left alone" is from late 15c. Compare forlorn.
Lorraine Look up Lorraine at Dictionary.com
region in eastern France, from Medieval Latin Lotharingia, literally "Lothar's Realm," name later given to the northern portion of the lands assigned by the Treaty of Verdun (843 C.E.) to Lothair I in the first division of the Carolingian empire. His empire stretched from the North Sea to the Mediterranean. Before his death (855 C.E.), Lothair subdivided his lands among his three sons. His son, Lothair (for whom the region is named), was given Lotharingia as his kingdom.
lorry (n.) Look up lorry at Dictionary.com
"a truck; a long, flat wagon," 1838, British railroad word, probably from verb lurry "to pull, tug" (1570s), of uncertain origin. Meaning "large motor vehicle for carrying goods" is first attested 1911.
lory (n.) Look up lory at Dictionary.com
small parrot of New Guinea and Australia, 1690s, from Malay luri, name of kind of parrot, variant of nuri.
Los Angeles Look up Los Angeles at Dictionary.com
city in southern California, U.S., founded 1781; the modern name is short for the original, given variously as El Pueblo de Nuestra Señora de los Ángeles or El Pueblo de la Reyna de los Ángeles.
lose (v.) Look up lose at Dictionary.com
Old English losian "be lost, perish," from los "destruction, loss," from Proto-Germanic *lausa- (cognates: Old Norse los "the breaking up of an army;" Old English forleosan "to lose, destroy," Old Frisian forliasa, Old Saxon farliosan, Middle Dutch verliesen, Old High German firliosan, German verlieren), from PIE root *leu- "to loosen, divide, cut apart, untie, separate" (cognates: Sanskrit lunati "cuts, cuts off," lavitram "sickle;" Greek lyein "to loosen, untie, slacken," lysus "a loosening;" Latin luere "to loose, release, atone for, expiate").

Replaced related leosan (a class II strong verb whose past participle loren survives in forlorn and lovelorn), from Proto-Germanic *leusanan (cognates: Old High German virliosan, German verlieren, Old Frisian urliasa, Gothic fraliusan "to lose").

Transitive sense of "to part with accidentally" is from c. 1200. Meaning "fail to maintain" is from mid-15c. Meaning "to be defeated" (in a game, etc.) is from 1530s. Meaning "to cause (someone) to lose his way" is from 1640s. To lose (one's) mind "become insane" is attested from c. 1500. To lose out "fail" is 1858, American English. Related: Lost; losing.
loser (n.) Look up loser at Dictionary.com
mid-14c., "a destroyer," agent noun from lose (v.). Sense of "one who suffers loss" is from 1540s; meaning "horse that loses a race" is from 1902; "convicted criminal" is from 1912; "hapless person" is 1955 student slang.
loss (n.) Look up loss at Dictionary.com
Old English los "loss, destruction," from Proto-Germanic *lausa- (see lose). The modern word, however, probably evolved 14c. with a weaker sense, from lost, the original past participle of lose. Phrase at a loss (1590s) originally refers to hounds losing the scent. To cut (one's) losses is from 1885, originally in finance.
lossy (adj.) Look up lossy at Dictionary.com
"characterized by loss," 1948, a term in electrical engineering, from loss + -y (2).
lost (adj.) Look up lost at Dictionary.com
"defeated," c. 1300; "wasted, spent in vain," c. 1500; also "no longer to be found" (1520s), from past participle of lose. Lost Cause in reference to the Southern U.S. bid for independence is from the title of E.A. Pollard's history of the CSA and the rebellion (1866). Lost Generation in reference to the period 1914-18 first attested 1926 in Hemingway's "The Sun Also Rises," where he credits it to Gertrude Stein. Lost-and-found as the name of a department where misplaced articles are brought or sought is by 1907.
lot (n.) Look up lot at Dictionary.com
Old English hlot "object (anything from dice to straw, but often a chip of wood with a name inscribed on it) used to determine someone's share," also "what falls to a person by lot," from Proto-Germanic *khlutom (cognates: Old Norse hlutr "lot, share," Old Frisian hlot "lot," Old Saxon hlot, Middle Dutch, Dutch lot, Old High German hluz "share of land," German Los; Old English hleotan "to cast lots, to foretell"), of unknown origin. The object was placed with others in a receptacle, which was shaken, the winner being the one that fell out first. Hence, to cast lots. In some cases the lots were drawn by hand. The word was adopted from Germanic into the Romanic languages (compare lottery, lotto). Meaning "choice resulting from the casting of lots" first attested c. 1200.

Sense of "plot of land" is first recorded 1630s (distribution of the best property in new settlements often determined by casting lots), that of "group, collection" is 1725, from notion of auction lots. The generalized sense of "great many" is first attested in 1812. To cast (one's) lot with another is to agree to share winnings.
lote (n.) Look up lote at Dictionary.com
1510s, Englished form of lotus.
loth (adj.) Look up loth at Dictionary.com
alternative spelling of loath.
Lothario Look up Lothario at Dictionary.com
masc. proper name, Italian form of Old High German Hlothari, Hludher (whence German Luther, French Lothaire), literally "famous warrior," from Old High German lut (see loud) + heri "host, army" (see harry (v.)). As a characteristic name for a lady-killer, 1756, from the name of the principal male character of Nicholas Rowe's "The Fair Penitent" (1703).
lotion (n.) Look up lotion at Dictionary.com
c. 1400, loscion, from Old French lotion (14c.), from Latin lotionem (nominative lotio) "a washing," from lotus, popular form of lautus, past participle of lavere "to wash" (see lave). As a verb, from 1817. Related: Lotioned; lotioning.
lottery (n.) Look up lottery at Dictionary.com
1560s, "arrangement for a distribution of prizes by chance," from Italian lotteria, from lotto "lot, portion, share," from same root as Old English hlot (see lot). Compare Middle French loterie, from Middle Dutch loterje, from lot (n.).
Lottie Look up Lottie at Dictionary.com
also Lotta, fem. proper name, a diminutive of Charlotte.
lotto (n.) Look up lotto at Dictionary.com
1778, "type of card game," from French loto and directly from Italian lotto "a lot," from Old French lot "lot, share, reward, prize," from Frankish or some other Germanic source (compare Old English and Old Frisian hlot; see lot (n.)). Meaning "a lottery, a game of chance" is attested from 1787.
lotus (n.) Look up lotus at Dictionary.com
1540s, from Latin lotus, from Greek lotos, name used for several plants before it came to mean Egyptian white lotus (a sense attested in English from 1580s); perhaps from a Semitic source (compare Hebrew lot "myrrh"). The yogic sense is attested from 1848. Lotus-eaters (1812) are from Greek lotophagoi, mentioned in "Odyssey," book IX.
louche (adj.) Look up louche at Dictionary.com
"dubious, disreputable," 1819, from French louche "squinting," from Old French lousche, lois (12c.) "cross-eyed, squint-eyed, lop-sided," from Latin lusca, fem. of luscus "one-eyed," of unknown origin.
loud (adj.) Look up loud at Dictionary.com
Old English hlud "noisy, making noise, sonorous," from West Germanic *khluthaz "heard" (cognates: Old Frisian and Old Saxon hlud, Middle Dutch luut, Dutch luid, Old High German hlut, German laut "loud"), from PIE past participle *klutos- (cognates: Sanskrit srutah, Greek klytos "heard of, celebrated," Armenian lu "known," Welsh clod "praise"), from root *kleu- "to hear" (see listen).

Application to colors first recorded 1849. The adverb is from Old English hlude, from Proto-Germanic *khludai (cognates: Dutch luid, German laut). Paired with clear since at least c. 1650.
loudly (adv.) Look up loudly at Dictionary.com
c. 1400, from loud + -ly (2).