lossy (adj.) Look up lossy at Dictionary.com
"characterized by loss," 1948, a term in electrical engineering, from loss + -y (2).
lost (adj.) Look up lost at Dictionary.com
"defeated," c.1300; "wasted, spent in vain," c.1500; also "no longer to be found" (1520s), from past participle of lose. Lost Cause in reference to the Southern U.S. bid for independence is from the title of E.A. Pollard's history of the CSA and the rebellion (1866). Lost Generation in reference to the period 1914-18 first attested 1926 in Hemingway's "The Sun Also Rises," where he credits it to Gertrude Stein.
lot (n.) Look up lot at Dictionary.com
Old English hlot "object (anything from dice to straw, but often a chip of wood with a name inscribed on it) used to determine someone's share," also "what falls to a person by lot," from Proto-Germanic *khlutom (cognates: Old Norse hlutr "lot, share," Old Frisian hlot "lot," Old Saxon hlot, Middle Dutch, Dutch lot, Old High German hluz "share of land," German Los; Old English hleotan "to cast lots, to foretell"), of unknown origin. The object was placed with others in a receptacle, which was shaken, the winner being the one that fell out first. Hence, to cast lots. In some cases the lots were drawn by hand. The word was adopted from Germanic into the Romanic languages (compare lottery, lotto). Meaning "choice resulting from the casting of lots" first attested c.1200.

Sense of "plot of land" is first recorded 1630s (distribution of the best property in new settlements often determined by casting lots), that of "group, collection" is 1725, from notion of auction lots. The generalized sense of "great many" is first attested in 1812. To cast (one's) lot with another is to agree to share winnings.
lote (n.) Look up lote at Dictionary.com
1510s, anglicized form of lotus.
loth (adj.) Look up loth at Dictionary.com
alternative spelling of loath.
Lothario Look up Lothario at Dictionary.com
masc. proper name, Italian form of Old High German Hlothari, Hludher (whence German Luther, French Lothaire), literally "famous warrior," from Old High German lut (see loud) + heri "host, army" (see harry (v.)). As a characteristic name for a lady-killer, 1756, from the name of the principal male character of Nicholas Rowe's "The Fair Penitent" (1703).
lotion (n.) Look up lotion at Dictionary.com
c.1400, loscion, from Old French lotion (14c.), from Latin lotionem (nominative lotio) "a washing," from lotus, popular form of lautus, past participle of lavere "to wash" (see lave). As a verb, from 1817. Related: Lotioned; lotioning.
lottery (n.) Look up lottery at Dictionary.com
1560s, "arrangement for a distribution of prizes by chance," from Italian lotteria, from lotto "lot, portion, share," from same root as Old English hlot (see lot). Compare Middle French loterie, from Middle Dutch loterje, from lot (n.).
Lottie Look up Lottie at Dictionary.com
also Lotta, fem. proper name, a diminutive of Charlotte.
lotto (n.) Look up lotto at Dictionary.com
1778, "type of card game," from French loto and directly from Italian lotto "a lot," from Old French lot "lot, share, reward, prize," from Frankish or some other Germanic source (compare Old English and Old Frisian hlot; see lot (n.)). Meaning "a lottery, a game of chance" is attested from 1787.
lotus (n.) Look up lotus at Dictionary.com
1540s, from Latin lotus, from Greek lotos, name used for several plants before it came to mean Egyptian white lotus (a sense attested in English from 1580s); perhaps from a Semitic source (compare Hebrew lot "myrrh"). The yogic sense is attested from 1848. Lotus-eaters (1812) are from Greek lotophagoi, mentioned in "Odyssey," book IX.
louche (adj.) Look up louche at Dictionary.com
"dubious, disreputable," 1819, from French louche "squinting," from Old French lousche, lois (12c.) "cross-eyed, squint-eyed, lop-sided," from Latin lusca, fem. of luscus "one-eyed," of unknown origin.
loud (adj.) Look up loud at Dictionary.com
Old English hlud "noisy, making noise, sonorous," from West Germanic *khluthaz "heard" (cognates: Old Frisian and Old Saxon hlud, Middle Dutch luut, Dutch luid, Old High German hlut, German laut "loud"), from PIE past participle *klutos- (cognates: Sanskrit srutah, Greek klytos "heard of, celebrated," Armenian lu "known," Welsh clod "praise"), from root *kleu- "to hear" (see listen).

Application to colors first recorded 1849. The adverb is from Old English hlude, from Proto-Germanic *khludai (cognates: Dutch luid, German laut). Paired with clear since at least c.1650.
loudly (adv.) Look up loudly at Dictionary.com
c.1400, from loud + -ly (2).
loudmouth (n.) Look up loudmouth at Dictionary.com
also loud-mouth, "loud or talkative person," 1872, from loud (adj.) + mouth (n.).
loudness (n.) Look up loudness at Dictionary.com
Old English hludnis "loudness, clamor;" see loud + -ness.
loudspeaker (n.) Look up loudspeaker at Dictionary.com
also loud-speaker, 1884, from loud (adj.) + speaker.
lough (n.) Look up lough at Dictionary.com
"a lake, pool," early 14c., Anglo-Celtic, representing a northern form of Irish and Gaelic loch, Welsh llwch, from PIE root *laku- (see lake (n.1)).
Louis Look up Louis at Dictionary.com
masc. proper name, from French Louis, from Old French Loois, probably via Medieval Latin Ludovicus, a Latinization of Old High German Hluodowig, literally "famous in war" (cognate with Clovis; for etymology, see Ludwig). Louis Quatorze (1855) refers to styles reminiscent of the time of King Louis XIV of France (1643-1715).
Louise Look up Louise at Dictionary.com
also Louisa, fem. proper name, fem. of Louis.
Louisiana Look up Louisiana at Dictionary.com
named 1682 by French explorer la Salle for Louis XIV of France. The name originally applied to the entire Mississippi basin.
lounge (n.) Look up lounge at Dictionary.com
"comfortable drawing room," 1881, from lounge (v.); in the sense of "couch on which one can lie at full length," it is attested from 1830. Lounge lizard is by 1917, perhaps from 1912, a term of contempt, originally in reference to men who hung around in tea rooms to flirt.
lounge (v.) Look up lounge at Dictionary.com
"to loll idly," c.1500, Scottish, of uncertain origin, perhaps [Barnhart] from French s'allonger (paresseusement) "to lounge about, lie at full length," from Old French alongier "lengthen," from Latin longus "long" (see long (adj.)). Another etymology traces it through obsolete lungis (n.) "slow, lazy person" (c.1560), from Middle French longis, a generic application of Longinus, supposed to be the name of the centurion who pierced Christ's side with a spear in John xix:34. Popular etymology associated the name directly with long (adj.). Related: Lounged; lounging.
loupe (n.) Look up loupe at Dictionary.com
"watchmaker's magnifier," 1909, from French loupe.
lour (v.) Look up lour at Dictionary.com
"to frown," late 13c. variant of lower (v.2). Related: Loured; louring.
louse (n.) Look up louse at Dictionary.com
"parasitic insect infecting human hair and skin," Old English lus, from Proto-Germanic *lus (cognates: Old Norse lus, Middle Dutch luus, Dutch luis, Old High German lus, German Laus), from PIE *lus- "louse" (cognates: Welsh lleuen "louse"). Slang meaning "obnoxious person" is from 1630s. The plural lice (Old English lys) shows effects of i-mutation. The verb meaning "to clear of lice" is from late 14c.; to louse up "ruin, botch" first attested 1934, from the literal sense (of bedding), from 1931. Grose ["Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue," 1785] has louse ladder "A stitch fallen in a stocking."
lousy (adj.) Look up lousy at Dictionary.com
mid-14c., lousi, "infested with lice," from louse + -y (2). Figurative use as a generic adjective of abuse dates from late 14c.; sense of "swarming with" (money, etc.) is American English slang from 1843. Related: Lousiness.
lout (n.) Look up lout at Dictionary.com
1540s, "awkward fellow, clown, bumpkin," perhaps from a dialectal survival of Middle English louten (v.) "bow down" (c.1300), from Old English lutan "bow low," from Proto-Germanic *lut- "to bow, bend, stoop" (cognates: Old Norse lutr "stooping," which might also be the source of the modern English word), from PIE *leud- "to lurk" (cognates: Gothic luton "to deceive," Old English lot "deceit), also "to be small" (see little). Non-Germanic cognates probably include Lithuanian liudeti "to mourn;" Old Church Slavonic luditi "to deceive," ludu "foolish." Sense of "cad" is first attested 1857 in British schoolboy slang.
loutish (adj.) Look up loutish at Dictionary.com
1550s, from lout + -ish. Related: Loutishly; loutishness.
louver (n.) Look up louver at Dictionary.com
also louvre, early 14c., "domed turret-like structure atop a building to disperse smoke and admit light," from Old French lovier, of uncertain origin. One theory connects it to Medieval Latin *lodarium, which might be from a Germanic source (compare Old High German louba "upper room, roof;" see lobby). Another suggests it is from French l'ouvert, literally "the open place," from le, definite article, + past participle of ouvrir "to open." Meaning "overlapping strips in a window (to let in air but keep out rain)" first recorded 1550s. The form has been influenced by apparently unrelated French Louvre, the name of the palace in Paris, which is said to be so named because its builder, Philip Augustus, intended it as a wolf kennel. Related: Louvered.
lovable (adj.) Look up lovable at Dictionary.com
also loveable, mid-14c., from love (v.) + -able. Related: Lovably.
love (n.) Look up love at Dictionary.com
Old English lufu "love, affection, friendliness," from Proto-Germanic *lubo (cognates: Old High German liubi "joy," German Liebe "love;" Old Norse, Old Frisian, Dutch lof; German Lob "praise;" Old Saxon liof, Old Frisian liaf, Dutch lief, Old High German liob, German lieb, Gothic liufs "dear, beloved").

The Germanic words are from PIE *leubh- "to care, desire, love" (cognates: Latin lubet, later libet "pleases;" Sanskrit lubhyati "desires;" Old Church Slavonic l'ubu "dear, beloved;" Lithuanian liaupse "song of praise").
"Even now," she thought, "almost no one remembers Esteban and Pepita but myself. Camilla alone remembers her Uncle Pio and her son; this woman, her mother. But soon we shall die and all memory of those five will have left the earth, and we ourselves shall be loved for a while and forgotten. But the love will have been enough; all those impulses of love return the love that made them. Even memory is not necessary for love. There is a land of the living and a land of the dead and the bridge is love, the only survival, the only meaning." [Thornton Wilder, "Bridge of San Luis Rey," 1927]
Meaning "a beloved person" is from early 13c. The sense "no score" (in tennis, etc.) is 1742, from the notion of "playing for love," i.e. "for nothing" (1670s). Phrase for love or money "for anything" is attested from 1580s. Love seat is from 1904. Love-letter is attested from mid-13c.; love-song from early 14c. To fall in love is attested from early 15c. To be in love with (someone) is from c.1500. To make love is from 1570s in the sense "pay amorous attention to;" as a euphemism for "have sex," it is attested from c.1950. Love life "one's collective amorous activities" is from 1919, originally a term in psychological jargon. Love affair is from 1590s. The phrase no love lost (between two people) is ambiguous and was used 17c. in reference to two who love each other well (c.1640) as well as two who have no love for each other (1620s).
love (v.) Look up love at Dictionary.com
Old English lufian "to love, cherish, show love to; delight in, approve," from Proto-Germanic *lubojan (cognates: Old High German lubon, German lieben), from root of love (n.). Related: Loved; loving. Adjective Love-hate "ambivalent" is from 1937, originally a term in psychological jargon.
love apple (n.) Look up love apple at Dictionary.com
"tomato," 1570s, corresponding to French pomme d'amour, German liebesapfel, but the reason for the term remains obscure. One guess is that it is a corruption of Italian pomo de'Mori or Spanish pome dei Moro, literally "Moorish apple."
love bird (n.) Look up love bird at Dictionary.com
1590s, small species of West African parrot, noted for the remarkable attention mating pairs pay to one another; figurative sense of "a lover" is attested from 1911.
Hold hands, you lovebirds. [Emil Sitka]
love child (n.) Look up love child at Dictionary.com
"child born out of wedlock," 1805, from love (n.) + child. Earlier was love brat (17c.).
loveless (adj.) Look up loveless at Dictionary.com
early 14c., "feeling no love;" late 14c. "unloved," from from love (n.) + -less. Attested from mid-13c. as a surname. Related: Lovelessly; lovelessness.
lovelily (adv.) Look up lovelily at Dictionary.com
early 14c., from lovely + -ly (2).
loveliness (n.) Look up loveliness at Dictionary.com
mid-14c., "lovableness," from lovely + -ness.
lovelonging (n.) Look up lovelonging at Dictionary.com
c.1300, luue langing, from love (n.) + infinitive of long (v.).
lovelorn (adj.) Look up lovelorn at Dictionary.com
also love-lorn, "pining for love," 1630s, from love (n.) + lorn. Perhaps coined by Milton.
lovely (adj.) Look up lovely at Dictionary.com
Old English luflic "affectionate, loveable;" see love (n.) + -ly (1). The modern sense of "lovable on account of beauty, attractive" is from c.1300, "applied indiscriminately to all pleasing material objects, from a piece of plum-cake to a Gothic cathedral" [George P. Marsh, "The Origin and History of the English Language," 1862].
lovemaking (n.) Look up lovemaking at Dictionary.com
"courtship," mid-15c., from love (n.) + make. Phrase make love is attested from 1570s in the sense "pay amorous attention to;" as a euphemism for "have sex," it is attested from c.1950.
lover (n.) Look up lover at Dictionary.com
early 13c., agent noun from love (v.). Old English had lufend for male lovers, lufestre for women. Meaning "one who has a predilection for" (a thing, concept, pursuit, etc.) is mid-14c. As a form of address to a lover, from 1911. Related: Loverly.
lovesick (adj.) Look up lovesick at Dictionary.com
also love-sick, 1520s, from love (n.) + sick (adj.).
lovesome (adj.) Look up lovesome at Dictionary.com
Old English lufsum "worthy of love," from love (v.) + -some (1). Early 13c. as "lovely," 1720 as "amorous." An old word that might be useful in its original sense. Related: Lovesomely; lovesomeness.
lovestruck (adj.) Look up lovestruck at Dictionary.com
also love-struck, by 1762, from love (n.) + struck (see strike (v.)). Love stricken is attested from 1805.
lovey Look up lovey at Dictionary.com
affectionate pet name, 1731, from love (n.) + -y (3). Extended form lovey-dovey attested from 1819 (n.), 1847 (adj.).
loving Look up loving at Dictionary.com
Old English lufenda (see love (v.)). Loving cup is attested from 1808. Lovingkindness was Coverdale's word.
lovingly (adv.) Look up lovingly at Dictionary.com
late 14c., from loving + -ly (2).