passageway (n.)
1640s, American English, from passage + way (n.).
Passamaquoddy
Indian tribe of southeast Maine, from Micmac, literally "place where pollack are plentiful," or else, if it originally is a tribal name, "those of the place of many pollack."
passant (adj.)
late 14c., from Old French passant, present participle of passer (see pass (v.)).
passbook (n.)
also pass-book, 1828, from pass (v.) + book (n.); apparently the notion is of the document "passing" between bank and customer.
passe (adj.)
1775, from French passé (fem. passée) "past, faded," past participle of passer "to pass" (see pass (v.)). Originally of a woman past the period of greatest beauty.
passe-partout (n.)
"master-key," 1670s, French, literally "pass everywhere," from passer "to pass" (see pass (v.)) + partout "everywhere," from par "through" (see per) + tout "all."
passel (n.)
1835, dialectal variant of parcel (n.).
passenger (n.)
early 14c., passager "passer-by," from Old French passagier "traveler, passer-by" (Modern French passager), noun use of passagier (adj.) "passing, fleeting, traveling," from passage (see passage).
And in this I resemble the Lappwing, who fearing hir young ones to be destroyed by passengers, flyeth with a false cry farre from their nestes, making those that looke for them seeke where they are not .... [John Lyly, "Euphues and His England," 1580]
The -n- was added early 15c. (compare messenger, harbinger, scavenger, porringer). Meaning "one traveling in a vehicle or vessel" first attested 1510s. Passenger-pigeon of North America so called from 1802; extinct since 1914.
passer-by (n.)
also passerby, 1560s, from agent noun of pass (v.) + by; earlier, this sense was in passager (see passenger).
passerine (adj.)
1776, from Latin passerinus "of a sparrow," from passer "sparrow," possibly of imitative origin. The noun is 1842, from the adjective.
passim (adv.)
"occurring in various places," Latin, literally "scatteredly, in every direction," adverb from passus, past participle of pandere "to stretch" (see pace (n.)).
passing (adv.)
"in a (sur)passing degree, surpassingly," late 14c., from pass (v.).
passing (n.)
"death," 1869, verbal noun from pass (v.).
passion (n.)
late 12c., "sufferings of Christ on the Cross," from Old French passion "Christ's passion, physical suffering" (10c.), from Late Latin passionem (nominative passio) "suffering, enduring," from past participle stem of Latin pati "to suffer, endure," possibly from PIE root *pe(i)- "to hurt" (cognates: Sanskrit pijati "reviles, scorns," Greek pema "suffering, misery, woe," Old English feond "enemy, devil," Gothic faian "to blame").

Sense extended to sufferings of martyrs, and suffering generally, by early 13c.; meaning "strong emotion, desire" is attested from late 14c., from Late Latin use of passio to render Greek pathos. Replaced Old English þolung (used in glosses to render Latin passio), literally "suffering," from þolian (v.) "to endure."

Sense of "sexual love" first attested 1580s; that of "strong liking, enthusiasm, predilection" is from 1630s. The passion-flower so called from 1630s.
The name passionflower -- flos passionis -- arose from the supposed resemblance of the corona to the crown of thorns, and of the other parts of the flower to the nails, or wounds, while the five sepals and five petals were taken to symbolize the ten apostles -- Peter ... and Judas ... being left out of the reckoning. ["Encyclopaedia Britannica," 1885]
passionate (adj.)
early 15c., "angry; emotional," from Medieval Latin passionatus "affected with passion," from Latin passio (genitive passionis) "passion" (see passion). Specific sense of "amorous" is attested from 1580s. Related: Passionately.
passive (adj.)
late 14c., in grammatical sense (opposed to active), Old French passif "suffering, undergoing hardship" (14c.) and directly from Latin passivus "capable of feeling or suffering," from pass-, past participle stem of pati "to suffer" (see passion). Meaning "not active" is first recorded late 15c.; sense of "enduring suffering without resistance" is from 1620s. Related: Passively. Passive resistance first attested 1819 in Scott's "Ivanhoe," used throughout 19c.; re-coined by Gandhi c.1906 in South Africa. Passive-aggressive with reference to behavior is attested by 1971.
passiveness (n.)
1650s, from passive + -ness.
passivist (n.)
1895, originally in reference to sex roles, from passive + -ist.
passivity (n.)
1650s, from passive + -ity.
Passover
1530, coined by Tyndale from verbal phrase pass over, to translate Hebrew ha-pesah "Passover," from pesah (see paschal), in reference to the Lord "passing over" the houses of the Israelites in Egypt when he killed the first-born of the Egyptians (Ex. xii).
passport (n.)
c.1500, from Middle French passeport "authorization to pass through a port" to enter or leave a country (15c.), from passe, imperative of Old French passer "to pass" (see pass (v.)) + port "port" (see port (n.1)).
password (n.)
"word appointed as a sign to distinguish friend from foe," 1798, from pass (v.) + word (n.).
past (adj.)
c.1300, "done with, over," from past participle of passen "go by" (see pass (v.)). Past participle is recorded from 1798; past tense from 1813.
past (n.)
"times gone by," 1580s, from past (adj.).
pasta (n.)
1874, from Italian pasta, from Late Latin pasta "dough, pastry cake, paste," from Greek pasta "barley porridge," probably originally "a salted mess of food," from neuter plural of pastos (adj.) "sprinkled, salted," from passein "to sprinkle," from PIE root *kwet- "to shake" (see quash).
paste (n.)
c.1300 (mid-12c. as a surname), "dough," from Old French paste "dough, pastry" (13c., Modern French pâte), from Late Latin pasta "dough, pastry cake, paste" (see pasta). Meaning "glue mixture" is first attested mid-15c.
paste (v.2)
"hit hard," 1846, probably an alteration of baste "beat" (see lambaste). Related: Pasted; pasting.
paste (v.1)
"to stick with paste," 1560s; see paste (n.). Related: Pasted; pasting.
paste-up (n.)
1930, from paste (v.) + up (adv.).
pasteboard (n.)
1540s, from paste (n.) + board (n.1). So called because it is made of sheets of paper pasted together.
pastel (n.)
1660s, "crayons, chalk-like pigment used in crayons," from French pastel "crayon," from Italian pastello "a pastel," literally "material reduced to a paste," from Late Latin pastellus "dye from the leaves of the woad plant," diminutive of pasta (see pasta). Meaning "pale or light color" (like that of pastels) first recorded 1899. As an adjective from 1884.
pastern (n.)
late 13c., "shackle fixed on the foot of a horse or other beast," from Old French pasturon (Modern French paturon), diminutive of pasture "shackle for a horse in pasture," from Vulgar Latin *pastoria, noun use of fem. of Latin pastorius "of herdsmen," from pastor "shepherd" (see pastor). Metathesis of -r- and following vowel occurred 1500s. Sense extended (1520s) to part of the leg to which the tether was attached.
pasteurization (n.)
1885, from pasteurize + -ation.
pasteurize (v.)
1881, with -ize, after Louis Pasteur (1822-1895), French chemist and bacteriologist, who invented the process of heating food, milk, wine, etc., to kill most of the micro-organisms in it; distinguished from sterilization, which involves killing all of them. The surname is literally "Pastor." Related: Pasteurized; pasteurizing.
pastiche (n.)
"a medley made up of fragments from different works," 1878, from French pastiche (18c.), from Italian pasticcio "medley, pastry cake," from Vulgar Latin *pasticium "composed of paste," from Late Latin pasta "paste, pastry cake" (see pasta). Borrowed earlier (1752) in the Italian form.
pasties (n.)
"adhesive patches worn over the nipples by exotic dancers," 1957, plural diminutive from paste (v.).
pastime (n.)
late 15c., passe tyme "recreation, diversion, amusement, sport," from pass (v.) + time (n.). Formed on model of Middle French passe-temps (15c.), from passe, imperative of passer "to pass" + temps "time."
pastor (n.)
late 14c. (mid-13c. as a surname), "shepherd," also "spiritual guide, shepherd of souls," from Old French pastor, pastur "herdsman, shepherd" (12c.), from Latin pastorem (nominative pastor) "shepherd," from pastus, past participle of pascere "to lead to pasture, set to grazing, cause to eat," from PIE root *pa- "to tend, keep, pasture, feed, guard, protect" (see food). The spiritual sense was in Church Latin (e.g. Gregory's "Cura Pastoralis"). The verb in the Christian sense is from 1872.
pastoral (adj.)
"of or pertaining to shepherds," early 15c., from Old French pastoral (13c.), from Latin pastoralis "of herdsmen, of shepherds," from pastor (see pastor (n.)). The noun sense of "poem dealing with country life generally," usually dealing with it in an idealized form and emphasizing the purity and happiness of it, is from 1580s.
pastorale (n.)
musical composition from rustic tunes or representing pastoral scenes," 1724, from Italian pastorale, noun use of adjective, from Latin pastoralis (see pastoral).
pastoralism (n.)
1854, from pastoral + -ism.
pastoralist (n.)
1793, from pastoral + -ist.
pastrami (n.)
1940, from Yiddish pastrame, from Rumanian pastrama, probably from Turkish pastrima, variant of basdirma "dried meat," from root *bas- "to press." Another possible origin of the Rumanian word [Barnhart] is Modern Greek pastono "I salt," from classical Greek pastos "sprinkled with salt, salted." Spelling in English with -mi probably from influence of salami.
pastry (n.)
mid-15c., "food made with paste," not originally limited to sweets, from Middle English paste (see paste (n.)) + -ry. Probably influenced by Old French pastaierie "pastry" (Modern French pâtisserie), from pastoier "pastry cook," from paste (see paste (n.)); also borrowed from Medieval Latin pasteria "pastry," from Latin pasta. Specific sense of "small confection made of pastry" is from 1906. Pastry-cook attested from 1712.
pasturage (n.)
1530s, from Old French pasturage (13c, Modern French pâturage), from pasturer "to pasture" (see pasture (v.)).
pasture (n.)
c.1300, "grass eaten by cattle," from Old French pasture "fodder, grass eaten by cattle" (12c., Modern French pâture), from Late Latin pastura "a feeding, grazing," from Latin pastus, past participle of pascere "to feed, graze" (see pastor). Meaning "land covered with vegetation suitable for grazing" is from early 14c. To be out to pasture "retired" is from 1945, from what was done (ideally) to horses after the active working life.
pasture (v.)
late 14c., of animals, "to graze;" early 15c., of humans, "to lead to pasture, to feed by putting in a pasture," from Old French pasturer (12c., Modern French pâturer, from pasture (see pasture (n.)). Related: Pastured; pasturing.
pasty (n)
c.1300, a type of pastry pie, from Old French paste "dough, pastry," from Vulgar Latin *pastata "meat wrapped in pastry" from Latin pasta (see pasta).
pasty (adj.)
"resembling paste," 1650s, from paste (n.) + -y (2). Related: Pastiness.
pat (n.)
c.1400, "a blow, stroke," perhaps originally imitative of the sound of patting. Meaning "light tap with hand" is from c.1804. Sense of "that which is formed by patting" (as in pat of butter) is 1754, probably from the verb. Pat on the back in the figurative sense attested by 1804.