patriarchal (adj.) Look up patriarchal at Dictionary.com
mid-15c., "pertaining to a (Church) patriarch," from patriarch + -al, or else from Late Latin patriarchalis, from patriarcha.
patriarchy (n.) Look up patriarchy at Dictionary.com
1560s, in ecclesiastical sense, from Greek patriarkhia, from patriarkhes (see patriarch). Meaning "system of society or government by fathers or elder males of the community" first recorded 1630s.
patriate (v.) Look up patriate at Dictionary.com
1966, in Canadian English (perhaps coined by Lester B. Pearson) in reference to constitutional laws, probably a back-formation from repatriate. Related: Patriated; patriation.
Patricia Look up Patricia at Dictionary.com
fem. proper name, from Latin, fem. of patricius "patrician, noble" (see Patrick).
patrician (n.) Look up patrician at Dictionary.com
early 15c., "member of the ancient Roman noble order," from Middle French patricien, from Latin patricius "of the rank of the nobles, of the senators; of fatherly dignity," from patres conscripti "Roman senators," literally "fathers," plural of pater "father" (see father (n.)). Contrasted, in ancient Rome, with plebeius. Applied to noble citizens and higher orders of free folk in medieval Italian and German cities (sense attested in English from 1610s); hence "nobleman, aristocrat" in a modern sense (1630s). As an adjective, attested from 1610s, from the noun.
patricide (n.) Look up patricide at Dictionary.com
1. "person who kills his father" (1590s), 2. "act of killing one's father" (1620s), from Middle French patricide in both senses, from 1. Latin patricida "murderer of a father," 2. Latin patricidium, from pater "father" + 1. cida "killer," 2. cidium "killing" (see -cide).
Patrick Look up Patrick at Dictionary.com
masc. proper name, from Old Irish Patraicc (Irish Padraig), from Latin Patricius, literally "a patrician" (see patrician). As a given name, chiefly in northern England and Scotland, in Ireland only a popular name after 1600, due probably to the Scots settlers in Ulster. [Reaney]
patrilineal (adj.) Look up patrilineal at Dictionary.com
1904, from patri- + lineal.
patrilocal (adj.) Look up patrilocal at Dictionary.com
1906, from patri- + local (adj.).
patrimonial (adj.) Look up patrimonial at Dictionary.com
1520s, from Middle French patrimonial- and directly from Late Latin patrimonialis, from Latin patrimonium (see patrimony).
patrimony (n.) Look up patrimony at Dictionary.com
mid-14c., "property of the Church," also "spiritual legacy of Christ," from Old French patremoine "heritage, patrimony" (12c.) and directly from Latin patrimonium "a paternal estate, inheritance from a father," also figurative, from pater (genitive patris) "father" (see father (n.)) + -monium, suffix signifying action, state, condition. Meaning "property inherited from a father or ancestors" is attested from late 14c. Figurative sense of "immaterial things handed down from the past" is from 1580s. A curious sense contrast to matrimony.
patriot (n.) Look up patriot at Dictionary.com
1590s, "compatriot," from Middle French patriote (15c.) and directly from Late Latin patriota "fellow-countryman" (6c.), from Greek patriotes "fellow countryman," from patrios "of one's fathers," patris "fatherland," from pater (genitive patros) "father" (see father (n.)); with -otes, suffix expressing state or condition. Liddell & Scott write that patriotes was "applied to barbarians who had only a common [patris], [politai] being used of Greeks who had a common [polis] (or free-state)."

Meaning "loyal and disinterested supporter of one's country" is attested from c.1600, but became an ironic term of ridicule or abuse from mid-18c. in England, so that Johnson, who at first defined it as "one whose ruling passion is the love of his country," in his fourth edition added, "It is sometimes used for a factious disturber of the government."
The name of patriot had become [c.1744] a by-word of derision. Horace Walpole scarcely exaggerated when he said that ... the most popular declaration which a candidate could make on the hustings was that he had never been and never would be a patriot. [Macaulay, "Horace Walpole," 1833]
Somewhat revived in reference to resistance movements in overrun countries in World War II, it has usually had a positive sense in American English, where the phony and rascally variety has been consigned to the word patrioteer (1928). Oriana Fallaci ["The Rage and the Pride," 2002] marvels that Americans, so fond of patriotic, patriot, and patriotism, lack the root noun and are content to express the idea of patria by cumbersome compounds such as homeland. (Joyce, Shaw, and H.G. Wells all used patria as an English word early 20c., but it failed to stick.) Patriots' Day (April 19, anniversary of the 1775 skirmishes at Lexington and Concord Bridge) was observed as a legal holiday in Maine and Massachusetts from 1894.
Patriot Act Look up Patriot Act at Dictionary.com
signed into law Oct. 26, 2001; a contrived acronym for Uniting and Strengthening America by Providing Appropriate Tools Required to Intercept and Obstruct Terrorism Act of 2001.
patriotic (adj.) Look up patriotic at Dictionary.com
1650s, "of one's own country," from French patriotique or directly from Late Latin patrioticus, from Greek patriotikos, from patriotes (see patriot). Meaning "loyal, supporting one's own country" is from 1757. Related: Patriotical.
patriotism (n.) Look up patriotism at Dictionary.com
1726, from patriot + -ism.
patristic (adj.) Look up patristic at Dictionary.com
1773, from patri- + -istic. Related: patristical (1819).
patroclinous (adj.) Look up patroclinous at Dictionary.com
"resembling the father rather than the mother," 1913, from patri- + Greek klinein "to lean" (see lean (v.)).
patrol (n.) Look up patrol at Dictionary.com
1660s, "action of going the rounds" (of a military camp, etc.), from French patrouille "a night watch" (1530s), from patrouiller "go the rounds to watch or guard," originally "tramp through the mud," probably soldiers' slang, from Old French patouiller "paddle in water," probably from pate "paw, foot" (see patten). Compare paddlefoot, World War II U.S. Army slang for "infantry soldier." Meaning "those who go on a patrol" is from 1660s. Sense of "detachment of soldiers sent out to scout the countryside, the enemy, etc." is attested from 1702.
patrol (v.) Look up patrol at Dictionary.com
1690s, from patrol (n.) and in part from French patrouiller. Related: Patrolled; patrolling.
patrolman (n.) Look up patrolman at Dictionary.com
"police constable on a particular beat," 1841, from patrol (n.) + man (n.).
patron (n.) Look up patron at Dictionary.com
"a lord-master, a protector," c.1300, from Old French patron "patron, protector, patron saint" (12c.) and directly from Medieval Latin patronus "patron saint, bestower of a benefice, lord, master, model, pattern," from Latin patronus "defender, protector, former master (of a freed slave); advocate," from pater (genitive patris) "father" (see father (n.)). Meaning "one who advances the cause" (of an artist, institution, etc.), usually by the person's wealth and power, is attested from late 14c.; "commonly a wretch who supports with insolence, and is paid with flattery" [Johnson]. Commercial sense of "regular customer" first recorded c.1600. Patron saint (1717) originally was simply patron (late 14c.).
patronage (n.) Look up patronage at Dictionary.com
late 14c., "right of presenting a qualified person to a church benefice," from Old French patronage (14c.) from patron (see patron). Secular sense of "action of giving influential support" is from 1550s. General sense of "power to give jobs or favors" is from 1769; meaning "regular business of customers" is 1804.
patroness (n.) Look up patroness at Dictionary.com
early 15c., from Medieval Latin patronissa, fem. of patronus "protector, defender" (see patron).
patronise (v.) Look up patronise at Dictionary.com
chiefly British English spelling of patronize (q.v.); for suffix, see -ize.
patronize (v.) Look up patronize at Dictionary.com
1580s, "to act as a patron towards," from patron + -ize, or from Old French patroniser. Meaning "treat in a condescending way" is first attested 1797; sense of "give regular business to" is from 1801. Related: Patronized; patronizing.
patronizing (adj.) Look up patronizing at Dictionary.com
1727, past participle adjective from patronize. Related: Patronizingly.
patronym (n.) Look up patronym at Dictionary.com
1834, from Greek patronymos, from patr-, comb. form of pater "father" (see father (n.)) + -onym "name" (see name (n.)).
patronymic (n.) Look up patronymic at Dictionary.com
1610s, from Late Latin patronymicum, from neuter of patronymicus "derived from a father's name," from patronymos "named from the father," from pater (genitive patros) "father" (see father (n.)) + onyma "name," Aeolic dialectal variant of onoma "name" (see name (n.)). As an adjective from 1660s.
patroon (n.) Look up patroon at Dictionary.com
1660s, variant of patron used in foreign contexts, from Dutch patroon (a French loan-word) or French patron "master, patron," from Old French (see patron; also see -oon); used from 1758 in parts of New York and New Jersey colonies for "landholder," especially one with certain manorial privileges (abolished c.1850) under the old Dutch governments by the charter of 1629.
patsy (n.) Look up patsy at Dictionary.com
"fall guy, victim of a deception," 1903, of uncertain origin, possibly an alteration of Italian pazzo "madman" (see patch (n.2)), or south Italian dialectal paccio "fool." Another theory traces it to Patsy Bolivar, character created by Billy B. Van in an 1890s vaudeville skit who was blamed whenever anything went wrong.
"Poor Rogers," Vincent said, still smiling, "he is always the 'Patsy Bolivar' of the school."
"Yes," Frank answered, "if there are any mistakes to be made or trouble to fall into, Rogers seems to be always the victim." ["Anthony Yorke," "A College Boy," 1899]
patten (n.) Look up patten at Dictionary.com
late 14c., from Old French patin "clog, type of shoe" (13c.), probably from pate "paw, foot," from Gallo-Roman *pauta, ultimately perhaps imitative of the sound made by a paw. The immediate source has been sought in Celtic [Barnhart] and Germanic [OED], but evidence is wanting. Likely cognates include Provençal pauta, Catalan pote, Middle Dutch and Dutch poot, German Pfote "paw."
patter (v.1) Look up patter at Dictionary.com
"make quick taps," 1610s, frequentative of pat (v.). Related: Pattered; pattering. As a noun in this sense from 1844.
patter (v.2) Look up patter at Dictionary.com
"talk rapidly," c.1400, from pater "mumble prayers rapidly" (c.1300), shortened form of paternoster. Perhaps influenced by patter (v.1). The related noun is first recorded 1758, originally "cant language of thieves and beggars." Compare Devil's paternoster (1520s) "a grumbling and mumbling to oneself."
PATTERING. The maundering or pert replies of servants; also talk or palaver in order to amuse one intended to be cheated. [Grose, "Classical Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue," 2nd edition. 1788]
pattern (n.) Look up pattern at Dictionary.com
early 14c., "outline, plan, model, pattern;" early 15c. as "model of behavior, exemplar," from Old French patron and directly from Medieval Latin patronus (see patron).

Extended sense of "decorative design" first recorded 1580s, from earlier sense of a "patron" as a model to be imitated. The difference in form and sense between patron and pattern wasn't firm till 1700s. Meaning "model or design in dressmaking" (especially one of paper) is first recorded 1792, in Jane Austen.
pattern (v.) Look up pattern at Dictionary.com
1580s, "to make a pattern for, design, plan," from pattern (n.). Meaning "to make something after a pattern" is c.1600. Phrase pattern after "take as a model" is from 1878.
patty (n.) Look up patty at Dictionary.com
"small pie," 1710, from patti-pan (1690s) "something baked in a small pan," from French pâté, from Old French paste (see paste (n.)).
paucity (n.) Look up paucity at Dictionary.com
late 14c., from Old French paucité (14c.) and directly from Latin paucitatem (nominative paucitas) "fewness, scarcity, a small number," from paucus "few, little," from PIE *pau-ko-, from root *pau- (1) "few, little" (cognates: Latin paullus "little;" Old English feawe "few;" see few (adj.)).
Paul Look up Paul at Dictionary.com
masc. proper name, Biblical name of the apostle to the Gentiles, from Latin Paulum (nominative Paulus), Roman surname of the Aemilian gens, literally "small," from PIE *pau-ro-lo-, from base *pau- (1) "few, little" (see few). Other forms include Old French Pol, Italian Paolo, Spanish Pablo, Russian Pavel.
pauldron (n.) Look up pauldron at Dictionary.com
"armor for the shoulder," mid-15c., from Old French espauleron, from espaule (French épaule) "shoulder" (see epaulet)
Pauline Look up Pauline at Dictionary.com
fem. proper name, fem. of Paul.
Pauline (adj.) Look up Pauline at Dictionary.com
"pertaining to the apostle Paul," 1817, from Latin Paulinus, from Paulus (see Paul).
paunch (n.) Look up paunch at Dictionary.com
late 14c. (late 12c. in surnames), from Old French pance (Old North French panche) "belly, stomach," from Latin panticem (nominative pantex) "belly, bowels" (source also of Spanish panza, Italian pancia); possibly related to panus "swelling" (see panic (n.2)).
paunchy (adj.) Look up paunchy at Dictionary.com
1590s, from paunch + -y (2). Related: Paunchiness.
pauper (n.) Look up pauper at Dictionary.com
1510s, "person destitute of property or means of livelihood," from Latin pauper "poor, not wealthy, of small means" (see poor (adj.)). Originally in English a legal word, from Latin phrase in forma pauperis (late 15c.) "in the character of a poor person," thus allowed to sue in court without legal fees.
pause (n.) Look up pause at Dictionary.com
early 15c., from Old French pausee "a pause, interruption" (14c.) and directly from Latin pausa "a halt, stop, cessation," from Greek pausis "stopping, ceasing," from pauein "to stop, to cause to cease," from PIE root *paus- "to leave, desert, cease, stop."
pause (v.) Look up pause at Dictionary.com
mid-15c., from pause (n.) and from Middle French pauser, from Late Latin pausare "to halt, cease, pause," ultimately from Late Latin pausa. Related: Paused; pausing.
pavan (n.) Look up pavan at Dictionary.com
"slow, stately dance," 1530s, from French pavane (1520s), probably from Spanish pavana, from pavo "peacock" (from Latin pavo), in reference to the bird's courting movements. But some see an Italian origin and trace the name to Padovana "Paduan." Possibly there was a merger of two distinct dance words.
pave (v.) Look up pave at Dictionary.com
early 14c., "to cover (a street) with stones or other material," from Old French paver "to pave" (12c.), perhaps a back-formation from Old French pavement or else from Vulgar Latin *pavare, from Latin pavire "to beat, ram, tread down," from PIE *pau- "to cut, strike, stamp" (cognates: Latin putare "to prune;" Greek paiein "to strike;" Lithuanian piauju "to cut," piuklas "saw"). Related: Paved; paving. The figurative sense of "make smooth" (as in pave the way) is attested from 1580s.
pavement (n.) Look up pavement at Dictionary.com
mid-13c., from Old French pavement "roadway, pathway; paving stone" (12c.) and directly from Latin pavimentum "hard floor, level surface beaten firm," from pavire (see pave).
paver (n.) Look up paver at Dictionary.com
late 15c., agent noun from pave (v.).