palliative (adj.) Look up palliative at
early 15c., from Middle French palliatif (14c.) or directly from Medieval Latin palliativus "under cloak, covert," from Late Latin palliatus (see palliate). As a noun, recorded from 1724.
pallid (adj.) Look up pallid at
"lacking color," 1580s, from Latin pallidus "pale, colorless," from root of pallere "be pale" (see pallor).
pallor (n.) Look up pallor at
c. 1400, from Old French palor "paleness, whiteness" (12c.) and directly from Latin pallor, from pallere "be pale, turn pale," related to pallus "dark-colored, dusky," from PIE root *pel- (2) "pale; gray" (source also of Sanskrit palitah "gray," panduh "whitish, pale;" Greek pelios "livid, dark," polios "gray;" Old English fealo "dull-colored, yellow, brown;" Welsh llwyd "gray").
palm (n.1) Look up palm at
"flat of the hand," c. 1300, from Old French palme (Modern French paume), from Latin palma "palm of the hand," also "flat end of an oar; palm tree," from PIE *pel- "to spread out; flat" (source also of Greek palame "open hand," Old Irish lam, Welsh llaw, Old English folm, Old High German folma "hand," Sanskrit panih "hand, hoof"). Palm oil is earlier in the punning sense of "bribe" (1620s) than in the literal sense of "oil from the fruit of the West African palm" (1705, from palm (n.2)).
palm (n.2) Look up palm at
tropical tree, Old English palma, Old French palme, both from Latin palma "palm tree," originally "palm of the hand;" the tree so called from the shape of its leaves, like fingers of a hand (see palm (n.1)).

The word traveled early to northern Europe, where the tree does not grow, via Christianity, and took root in the local languages (such as Old Saxon palma, Old High German palma, Old Norse palmr). Palm Sunday is Old English palm-sunnandæg.

In ancient times, a leaf or frond was carried or worn as a symbol of victory or triumph, or on feast days; hence figurative use of palm for "victory, triumph" (late 14c.). Palm court "large room in a hotel, etc., usually decorated with potted palms" first recorded 1908.
palm (v.) Look up palm at
"impose (something) on (someone)," 1670s, from palm (n.1). Extended form palm off is from 1822.
palm-tree (n.) Look up palm-tree at
Old English palm-treo; see palm (n.2) + tree (n.).
palmer (n.) Look up palmer at
"pilgrim who has returned from the Holy Land," late 12c. (as a surname), from Anglo-French palmer (Old French palmier), from Medieval Latin palmarius, from Latin palma "palm tree" (see palm (n.2)). So called because they wore palm branches in commemoration of the journey.
palmetto (n.) Look up palmetto at
1580s, from Spanish palmito "dwarf fan palm tree," diminutive of palma "palm tree," from Latin palma (see palm (n.2)). The suffix was subsequently Italianized. The Palmetto Flag was an emblem of South Carolina after secession (1860); the state was called Palmetto State from at least 1837.
palmistry (n.) Look up palmistry at
"divination from the palm of the hand," early 15c., from palme (see palm (n.1)) + obscure second element, perhaps -estre (as in Middle English webbestre "weaver") or -rie (as in Middle English archerie "archery"). Palmist (n.) is an 1886 back-formation.
palmy (adj.) Look up palmy at
"triumphant," c. 1600, from palm (n.2) in the "triumph" sense + -y (2). Literal meaning "full of palms" attested from 1660s.
palomino (n.) Look up palomino at
1914, from American Spanish palomino "cream-colored horse," from Spanish, literally "young dove," perhaps from Italian palombino "dove-colored," from Latin palumbinus "of wood pigeons," from palumba "wood pigeon" (see fallow (adj.)). The horse so called because of its dove-like coloring, light brown or cream with a pale mane and tail.
palooka (n.) Look up palooka at
"mediocre prizefighter," 1926, of unknown origin, credited to U.S. sportswriter and "Variety" staffer Jack Conway (d.1928). Non-boxing sense of "average person" is from Joe Palooka, hero of Ham Fisher's comic strip.
palp (n.) Look up palp at
"feeler," 1842, from French palpe, from Latin palpus "feeler," related to palpare "to touch, feel" (see feel (v.)).
palpable (adj.) Look up palpable at
late 14c., "that can be touched," from Late Latin palpabilis "that may be touched or felt," from Latin palpare "touch gently, stroke" (see feel (v.)). Figurative sense of "easily perceived, evident" also is from late 14c. Related: Palpably.
palpate (v.) Look up palpate at
"examine by touch," c. 1850, a back-formation from palpation, or else from Latin palpatus, past participle of palpare "to touch" (see feel (v.)). Related: Palpated; palpating.
palpation (n.) Look up palpation at
late 15c., from Middle French palpation, from Latin palpationem (nominative palpatio) "stroking, flattering, flattery," noun of action from past participle stem of palpare "to touch" (see feel (v.)). Used in English in literal sense.
palpitant (adj.) Look up palpitant at
1837, from French palpitant (early 16c.), from Latin palpitantem, present participle of palpitare "to move frequently and swiftly, tremble, throb," frequentative of palpare "to touch" (see feel (v.)).
palpitate (v.) Look up palpitate at
1620s, from Latin palpitatus, past participle of palpitare "to throb, flutter" (see palpitation). Related: Palpitated; palpitating.
palpitation (n.) Look up palpitation at
early 15c., from Middle French palpitation, from Latin palpitationem (nominative palpitatio), noun of action from past participle stem of palpitare "to throb, to flutter, to tremble, to quiver," frequentative of palpare "touch gently, stroke; wheedle, coax" (see feel (v.)).
palsgrave (n.) Look up palsgrave at
1540s, "a count palatine," from Middle Dutch palsgrave, from pals "palace" (from Latin palatium, see palace) + grave (Dutch graaf) "count" (see margrave). Similar formation in Middle High German pfalzgrave, German Pfalzgraf.
palsied (adj.) Look up palsied at
1540s, from palsy.
palsy (n.) Look up palsy at
"disease causing paralysis," c. 1300, palesie, from Anglo-French parlesie, Old French paralisie, from Vulgar Latin *paralysia, from Latin paralysis (see paralysis).
palter (v.) Look up palter at
1530s, "speak indistinctly," of unknown origin. It has the form of a frequentative, but no verb palt is known. Connection with paltry is uncertain. Hence "play fast and loose" (c. 1600). Related: Paltered; paltering; palterer.
paltry (adj.) Look up paltry at
1560s, probably an adjectival use of noun paltry "worthless thing" (1550s), associated with dialectal palt, pelt "trash," cognate with Middle Low German and East Frisian palte "rag," Middle Dutch palt "broken or torn fragment." Similar formation in Low German paltrig "rubbishy," East Frisian palterig "ragged, torn."
pampas (n.) Look up pampas at
"large plains of South America," 1704, from Spanish pampas, plural of pampa, from Quechua (Peru) pampa "a plain."
pamper (v.) Look up pamper at
late 14c., "to cram with food," probably from Middle Dutch (compare West Flemish pamperen "cram with food, overindulge;" dialectal German pampen "to cram"), probably from frequentative of root of pap (n.1). Meaning "to overindulge" first attested 1520s. Related: Pampered; pampering.
pampered (adj.) Look up pampered at
1520s, "over-fed," past participle adjective from pamper. Meaning "spoiled by luxury" is from 1690s.
pamphlet (n.) Look up pamphlet at
"small, unbound treatise," late 14c., from Anglo-Latin panfletus, popular short form of "Pamphilus, seu de Amore" ("Pamphilus, or about Love"), a short 12c. Latin love poem popular and widely copied in Middle Ages; the name from Greek pamphilos "loved by all," from pan- "all" + philos "loving, dear" see -phile). Meaning "brief work dealing with questions of current interest" is late 16c.
pamphleteer (n.) Look up pamphleteer at
1640s, from pamphlet + -eer. As a verb from 1690s.
Pamphylia Look up Pamphylia at
ancient region in modern Turkey, from Greek, literally "place of all races," from pan "all" (see pan-) + phylon "race" (see phylo-).
Pamplona Look up Pamplona at
city in Spain, Roman Pompeiopolis, named for Pompey, Roman emperor who founded it 68 B.C.E.
pan (n.) Look up pan at
Old English panne, earlier ponne (Mercian) "pan," from Proto-Germanic *panna "pan" (source also of Old Norse panna, Old Frisian panne, Middle Dutch panne, Dutch pan, Old Low German panna, Old High German phanna, German pfanne), probably an early borrowing (4c. or 5c.) from Vulgar Latin *patna, from Latin patina "shallow pan, dish, stewpan," from Greek patane "plate, dish," from PIE *pet-ano-, from root *pete- "to spread" (see pace (n.)). Irish panna probably is from English, and Lithuanian pana is from German.

Used of pan-shaped parts of mechanical apparatus from c. 1590; hence flash in the pan, a figurative use from early firearms, where a pan held the priming (and the gunpowder might "flash," but no shot ensue). To go out of the (frying) pan into the fire is first found in Spenser (1596).
pan (v.2) Look up pan at
"follow with a camera," 1913 shortening of panoramic in panoramic camera (1878). Meaning "to swing from one object to another in a scene" is from 1931. Related: Panned; panning.
Pan Look up Pan at
Arcadian shepherd god with upper body of a man and horns and lower part like a goat, late 14c., a god of the woods and fields, from Latin, from Greek Pan. Klein says perhaps cognate with Sanskrit pusan, a Vedic god, guardian and multiplier of cattle and other human possessions, literally "nourisher." Similarity to pan "all" (see pan-) led to his being regarded as a personification of nature. Pan-pipe, upon which he supposedly played, is attested from 1820.
pan (v.1) Look up pan at
"to wash gravel or sand in a pan in search of gold," 1839, from pan (n.); thus to pan out "turn out, succeed" (1868) is a figurative use of this (literal sense from 1849). The meaning "criticize severely" is from 1911, probably from the notion in contemporary slang expressions such as on the pan "under reprimand or criticism" (1923). Related: Panned; panning.
pan- Look up pan- at
word-forming element meaning "all, every, whole, all-inclusive," from Greek pan-, combining form of pas (neuter pan, masculine and neuter genitive pantos) "all," from PIE *pant- "all" (with derivatives found only in Greek and Tocharian).

Commonly used as a prefix in Greek, in modern times often with nationality names, the first example of which seems to have been Panslavism (1846). Also panislamic (1881), pan-American (1889), pan-German (1892), pan-African (1900), pan-European (1901), pan-Arabism (1930).
pan-Africanism Look up pan-Africanism at
1955, from pan-African (1900), from pan- + African.
panacea (n.) Look up panacea at
"universal remedy," 1540s, from Latin panacea, a herb (variously identified) that would heal all illnesses, from Greek panakeia "cure-all," from panakes "all-healing," from pan- "all" (see pan-) + akos "cure," from iasthai "to heal" (see -iatric). Earlier in English as panace (1510s).
panache (n.) Look up panache at
1550s, "a tuft or plume of feathers," from Middle French pennache "tuft of feathers," from Italian pennaccio, from Late Latin pinnaculum "small wing, gable, peak" (see pinnacle). Figurative sense of "display, swagger" first recorded 1898 (in translation of "Cyrano de Bergerac"), from French.
Panama Look up Panama at
probably from an unknown Guarani word, traditionally said to mean "place of many fish." Originally the name of the settlement founded 1519 (destroyed 1671 but subsequently rebuilt). Panama hat, made from the leaves of the screw pine, attested from 1833, a misnomer, because it originally was made in Ecuador, but perhaps so called in American English because it was distributed north from Panama City. Panama red as a variety of Central American marijuana is attested from 1967.
panatela (n.) Look up panatela at
also panetela, panetella, type of thin cigar, 1901, from Spanish panatela, literally "sponge-cake" (in American Spanish, "a long, thin biscuit"), a diminutive, formed from Latin panis "bread" (see food).
Panavision (n.) Look up Panavision at
1955, proprietary name of a type of wide-screen lens, word formed from elements of panorama + vision.
pancake (n.) Look up pancake at
early 15c. (late 13c. as a surname), from pan (n.) + cake (n.); as symbol of flatness c. 1600.
pancake (v.) Look up pancake at
"to squeeze flat," 1879, from pancake (n.). Later, of aircraft, "to fall flat" (1911), with figurative extension. Related: Pancaked; pancaking.
panchen Look up panchen at
Tibetian Buddhist title of respect, 1763, abbreviation of pandi-tachen-po, literally "great learned one."
pancreas (n.) Look up pancreas at
1570s, from Latinized form of Greek pankreas "sweetbread (pancreas as food), pancreas," literally "entirely flesh," from pan- "all" (see pan-) + kreas "flesh" (see raw), probably on notion of homogeneous substance of the organ.
pancreatitis (n.) Look up pancreatitis at
1842, medical Latin, from comb. form of pancreas + -itis "inflammation."
panda (n.) Look up panda at
1835, from French, apparently from the Nepalese name of a raccoon-like mammal (lesser panda) found there. First reference to the Giant Panda is from 1901; since its discovery in 1869 by French missionary Armand David (1826-1900) it had been known as parti-colored bear, but the name was changed after the zoological relationship to the red panda was established.
pandemic (adj.) Look up pandemic at
1660s, from Late Latin pandemus, from Greek pandemos "pertaining to all people; public, common," from pan- "all" (see pan-) + demos "people" (see demotic). Modeled on epidemic. The noun is first recorded 1853, from the adjective.