Seneca Look up Seneca at Dictionary.com
1610s, from Dutch Sennecas, collective name for the Iroquois tribes of what became upper New York, of uncertain origin, perhaps from a Mahican name for the Oneida or their village. Earlier sinnekens, senakees; form probably influenced by the name of the ancient Roman philosopher.
Senegal Look up Senegal at Dictionary.com
African nation, named for the river through it, perhaps from a local word meaning "navigable."
senescence (n.) Look up senescence at Dictionary.com
1690s, from senescent + -ence. Related: Scenescency (1660s).
senescent (adj.) Look up senescent at Dictionary.com
1650s, from Latin senescentem (nominative scenescens), present participle of senescere "to grow old," from senex "old" (see senile).
seneschal (n.) Look up seneschal at Dictionary.com
late 14c., "steward, majordomo, officer in a royal household in charge of ceremonies and feasts," from Old French seneschal, title of a high administrative court officer, from Frankish Latin siniscalcus, from Proto-Germanic *sini-skalk "senior servant;" first element cognate with Latin senex "old" (see senile); second element from Proto-Germanic *skalkoz "servant" (cognates: Gothic skalks, Old High German scalc, Old English scealc "servant;" see second element of marshal).
senicide (n.) Look up senicide at Dictionary.com
"killing of the old men," 1889, from stem of Latin senex ""old man" (see senile) + -cide.
senile (adj.) Look up senile at Dictionary.com
1660s, "suited to old age," from French sénile (16c.), from Latin senilis "of old age," from senex (genitive senis) "old, old man," from PIE root *sen- "old" (cognates: Sanskrit sanah "old;" Avestan hana- "old;" Old Persian hanata- "old age, lapse of time;" Armenian hin "old;" Greek enos "old, of last year;" Lithuanian senas "old," senis "an old man;" Gothic sineigs "old" (used only of persons), sinistra "elder, senior;" Old Norse sina "dry standing grass from the previous year;" Old Irish sen, Old Welsh hen "old"). Meaning "weak or infirm from age" is first attested 1848.
senility (n.) Look up senility at Dictionary.com
1753, from senile + -ity.
senior (adj.) Look up senior at Dictionary.com
late 13c., from Latin senior "older," comparative of senex (genitive senis) "old," from PIE root *sen- "old" (see senile). Original use in English was as an addition to a personal name indicating "the father" when father and son had the same name; meaning "higher in rank, longer in service" first recorded 1510s.

The Latin word yielded titles of respect in many languages, such as French sire, Spanish señor, Portuguese senhor, Italian signor. Senior citizen first recorded 1938, American English.
senior (n.) Look up senior at Dictionary.com
mid-14c., "person of authority;" late 14c., "person older than another," from senior (adj.). Sense of "fourth-year student" is from 1741, from earlier general sense of "advanced student" (1610s).
seniority (n.) Look up seniority at Dictionary.com
"priority on office or service," mid-15c., from Medieval Latin senioritas, from Latin senior (see senior (adj.)). Meaning "state or quality of being senior" is from 1530s.
senna (n.) Look up senna at Dictionary.com
tropical shrub, 1540s, from Modern Latin senna, from Arabic sana. Earlier was sene (c.1400), from French.
sennight (n.) Look up sennight at Dictionary.com
"period of seven days, a week" (archaic), c.1200, contracted from Old English seofon nihta; see seven + night. Also compare fortnight.
senor Look up senor at Dictionary.com
1620s, from Spanish señor "a gentleman; sir," from Latin seniorem (source also of Portuguese senhor; see senior (adj.)).
senora Look up senora at Dictionary.com
1570s, from Spanish señora "a lady; madam," fem. of señor (see senor). The Portuguese equivalent is senhora.
senorita (n.) Look up senorita at Dictionary.com
"a young Spanish lady," 1823, from Spanish señorita, Spanish title corresponding to English "Miss," diminutive of señora (see senora). The Portuguese equivalent is senhorita.
senryu Look up senryu at Dictionary.com
form of Japanese poetry, 1901, from name of Karai Senryu (1718-90), Japanese poet.
Sens Look up Sens at Dictionary.com
city in north-central France, Roman Senones, the capital of the Gaulish people of the same name.
sensate (adj.) Look up sensate at Dictionary.com
c.1500, from Late Latin sensatus "gifted with sense," from sensus (see sense (n.)). From 1937 in sociology. As a verb from 1650s.
sensation (n.) Look up sensation at Dictionary.com
1610s, "a reaction to external stimulation of the sense organs," from French sensation (14c.) and directly from Medieval Latin sensationem (nominative sensatio), from Late Latin sensatus "endowed with sense, sensible," from Latin sensus "feeling" (see sense (n.)). Meaning "state of shock, surprise, in a community" first recorded 1779.
The great object of life is sensation -- to feel that we exist, even though in pain. It is this 'craving void' which drives us to gaming -- to battle, to travel -- to intemperate, but keenly felt, pursuits of any description, whose principal attraction is the agitation inseparable from their accomplishment. [Lord Byron, letter, Sept. 6, 1813]
sensational (adj.) Look up sensational at Dictionary.com
"of or pertaining to sensation or the senses," 1840; "aiming at violently excited effects," 1863, from sensation in its secondary sense. Related: Sensationalistic; sensationalistically.
sensationalism (n.) Look up sensationalism at Dictionary.com
1846 in philosophy, "theory that sensation is the only source of knowledge;" 1865, of journalism that aims to excite the feelings, from sensational + -ism.
sensationalist Look up sensationalist at Dictionary.com
1846 in philosophy; 1868 of writers; from sensational + -ist. Related: Sensationalistic.
sensationalize (v.) Look up sensationalize at Dictionary.com
1863, from sensational + -ize. Originally of audiences as well as topics. Related: Sensationalized; sensationalizing.
sense (n.) Look up sense at Dictionary.com
c.1400, "faculty of perception," also "meaning, import, interpretation" (especially of Holy Scripture), from Old French sens "one of the five senses; meaning; wit, understanding" (12c.) and directly from Latin sensus "perception, feeling, undertaking, meaning," from sentire "perceive, feel, know," probably a figurative use of a literally meaning "to find one's way," or "to go mentally," from PIE root *sent- "to go" (cognates: Old High German sinnan "to go, travel, strive after, have in mind, perceive," German Sinn "sense, mind," Old English sið "way, journey," Old Irish set, Welsh hynt "way"). Application to any one of the external or outward senses (touch, sight, hearing, etc.) in English first recorded 1520s.
A certain negro tribe has a special word for "see;" but only one general word for "hear," "touch," "smell," and "taste." It matters little through which sense I realize that in the dark I have blundered into a pig-sty. In French "sentir" means to smell, to touch, and to feel, all together. [Erich M. von Hornbostel, "Die Einheit der Sinne" ("The Unity of the Senses"), 1927]
Meaning "that which is wise" is from c.1600. Meaning "capacity for perception and appreciation" is from c.1600 (as in sense of humor, attested by 1783, sense of shame, 1640s).
sense (v.) Look up sense at Dictionary.com
"to perceive by the senses," 1590s, from sense (n.). Meaning "be conscious inwardly of (one's state or condition) is from 1680s. Meaning "perceive (a fact or situation) not by direct perception" is from 1872. Related: Sensed; sensing.
senseless (adj.) Look up senseless at Dictionary.com
1550s, "without sensation," from sense (n.) + -less. Of actions, etc., "devoid of purpose, proceeding from lack of intelligence," it is attested from 1570s. Related: Senselessly; senselessness.
senses (n.) Look up senses at Dictionary.com
"mental faculties, conscious cognitive powers, sanity," 1560s, from sense (n.). Meaning "faculties of physical sensation" is from 1590s.
sensibility (n.) Look up sensibility at Dictionary.com
late 14c., "capability of being perceived by the senses; ability to sense or perceive," from Old French sensibilite, from Late Latin sensibilitatem (nominative sensibilitas), from sensibilis (see sensible). Rarely recorded until the emergence of the meaning "emotional consciousness, capacity for higher feelings or refined emotion" (1751). Related: Sensibilities.
sensible (adj.) Look up sensible at Dictionary.com
late 14c., "capable of sensation or feeling;" also "capable of being sensed or felt, perceptible to the senses," hence "easily understood; logical, reasonable," from Late Latin sensibilis "having feeling, perceptible by the senses," from sensus, past participle of sentire "perceive, feel" (see sense (n.)). Of persons, "aware, cognizant (of something)" early 15c.; "having good sense, capable of reasoning, discerning, clever," mid-15c. Of clothes, shoes, etc., "practical rather than fashionable" it is attested from 1855.

Other Middle English senses included "susceptible to injury or pain" (early 15c., now gone with sensitive); "worldly, temporal, outward" (c.1400); "carnal, unspiritual" (early 15c., now gone with sensual). Related: Sensibleness.
sensibly (adv.) Look up sensibly at Dictionary.com
early 15c., "in a manner perceived to the senses," from sensible + -ly (2). Meaning "with good sense" is attested from 1755.
sensitive (adj.) Look up sensitive at Dictionary.com
late 14c., in reference to the body or its parts, "having the function of sensation;" also (early 15c.) "pertaining to the faculty of the soul that receives and analyzes sensory information;" from Old French sensitif "capable of feeling" (13c.) and directly from Medieval Latin sensitivus "capable of sensation," from Latin sensus, past participle of sentire "feel perceive" (see sense (n.)).

Meaning "easily affected" (with reference to mental feelings) first recorded 1816; meaning "having intense physical sensation" is from 1849. Original meaning is preserved in sensitive plant (1630s), which is "mechanically irritable in a higher degree than almost any other plant" [Century Dictionary]. Meaning "involving national security" is recorded from 1953. Related: Sensitively; sensitiveness.
sensitivity (n.) Look up sensitivity at Dictionary.com
1803, from sensitive + -ity. Sensitivity training attested by 1954.
sensitization (n.) Look up sensitization at Dictionary.com
1862, originally in photography, noun of action from sensitize.
sensitize (v.) Look up sensitize at Dictionary.com
1856, in photography; see sensitive + -ize. Of persons from 1880. Related: Sensitized; sensitizing.
sensor (n.) Look up sensor at Dictionary.com
1947, from an adjective (1865), a shortened form of sensory (q.v.).
sensorimotor Look up sensorimotor at Dictionary.com
"pertaining to sensation and to motion," 1855, from comb. form of sensory + motor (n.).
sensorium (n.) Look up sensorium at Dictionary.com
1640s, "seat of the soul" in the brain, from Late Latin sensorium, from sens-, past participle stem of sentire "to feel" (see sense (n.)) + -orium (see -ory).
sensory (adj.) Look up sensory at Dictionary.com
1749, "pertaining to sense or sensation," from Latin sensorius, from sensus, past participle of sentire "to perceive, feel" (see sense (n.)).
sensual (adj.) Look up sensual at Dictionary.com
early 15c., "carnal, unspiritual;" mid-15c., "of or pertaining to the senses," from Middle French sensuel (15c.) and directly from Late Latin sensualis "endowed with feeling" (see sensuality). Meaning "connected with gratification of the senses," especially "lewd, unchaste" is attested from late 15c.
sensualism (n.) Look up sensualism at Dictionary.com
1803, "the philosophical doctrine that the senses are the sole source of knowledge," from sensual + -ism. From 1813 as "addiction to sensual indulgence."
sensualist (n.) Look up sensualist at Dictionary.com
1660s, from sensual + -ist.
sensuality (n.) Look up sensuality at Dictionary.com
mid-14c., "the part of man that is concerned with the senses," from Old French sensualite "the five senses; impression," from Late Latin sensualitatem (nominative sensualitas) "capacity for sensation," from Latin sensualis "endowed with feeling, sensitive," from sensus "feeling" (see sense (n.)). Chiefly "animal instincts and appetites," hence "the lower nature regarded as a source of evil, lusts of the flesh" (1620s).
sensualize (v.) Look up sensualize at Dictionary.com
1680s, from sensual + -ize. Related: Sensualized; sensualizing.
sensuous (adj.) Look up sensuous at Dictionary.com
1640s, "pertaining to the senses" apparently coined by Milton to recover the original meaning of sensual and avoid the lascivious connotation that the older word had acquired, but by 1870 sensuous, too, had begun down the same path and come to mean "alive to the pleasures of the senses." Rare before Coleridge popularized it "To express in one word all that appertains to the perception, considered as passive and merely recipient ...." (1814). From Latin sensus (see sense (n.)) + -ous. Related: Sensuously; sensuousness.
Sensurround Look up Sensurround at Dictionary.com
1974, proprietary name for movie special effects apparatus, coined from sense (n.) + surround.
sentence (n.) Look up sentence at Dictionary.com
c.1200, "doctrine, authoritative teaching; an authoritative pronouncement," from Old French sentence "judgment, decision; meaning; aphorism, maxim; statement of authority" (12c.) and directly from Latin sententia "thought, way of thinking, opinion; judgment, decision," also "a thought expressed; aphorism, saying," from sentientem, present participle of sentire "be of opinion, feel, perceive" (see sense (n.)). Loss of first -i- in Latin by dissimilation.

From early 14c. as "judgment rendered by God, or by one in authority; a verdict, decision in court;" from late 14c. as "understanding, wisdom; edifying subject matter." From late 14c. as "subject matter or content of a letter, book, speech, etc.," also in reference to a passage in a written work. Sense of "grammatically complete statement" is attested from mid-15c. "Meaning," then "meaning expressed in words." Related: Sentential.
sentence (v.) Look up sentence at Dictionary.com
"to pass judgment," c.1400, from sentence (n.). Related: Sentenced; sentencing.
sententious (adj.) Look up sententious at Dictionary.com
mid-15c., "full of meaning," from Middle French sententieux, from Latin sententiosus "full of meaning, pithy," from sententia "thought; expression of a thought" (see sentence (n.)). Meaning "addicted to pompous moralizing" first recorded 1590s. Related: Sententiously; sententiousness.
sentience (n.) Look up sentience at Dictionary.com
1817, "faculty of sense; feeling, consciousness;" see sentient + -ence. Related: Sentiency (1796).