salami (n.) Look up salami at Dictionary.com
"salted, flavored Italian sausage," 1852, from Italian salami, plural of salame "spiced pork sausage," from Vulgar Latin *salamen, from *salare "to salt," from Latin sal (genitive salis) "salt" (see salt (n.)).
salary (n.) Look up salary at Dictionary.com
late 13c., "compensation, payment," whether periodical, for regular service or for a specific service; from Anglo-French salarie, Old French salaire "wages, pay, reward," from Latin salarium "salary, stipend, pension," originally "salt-money, soldier's allowance for the purchase of salt," noun use of neuter of adjective salarius "pertaining to salt," from sal (genitive salis) "salt" (see salt (n.)). Japanese sarariman "male salaried worker," literally "salary-man," is from English.
salary (v.) Look up salary at Dictionary.com
"to pay a regular salary to," late 15c., from salary (n.). Related: Salaried, which as an adjective in reference to positions originally was contrasted with honorary; lately with hourly.
salat (n.) Look up salat at Dictionary.com
Islamic ritual prayer, from Arabic salah "prayer."
sale (n.) Look up sale at Dictionary.com
late Old English sala "a sale, act of selling," from a Scandinavian source such as Old Norse sala "sale," from Proto-Germanic *salo (cognates: Old High German sala, Swedish salu, Danish salg), from PIE root *sal- (3) "to grasp, take." Sense of "a selling of shop goods at lower prices than usual" first appeared 1866. Sales tax attested by 1886. Sales associate by 1946. Sales representative is from 1910.
saleable (adj.) Look up saleable at Dictionary.com
also salable, 1520s, from sale + -able. Related: Salability; saleability.
Salem Look up Salem at Dictionary.com
place mentioned in Gen. xiv:18, from Hebrew Shalem, usually said to be another word for Jerusalem and to mean "peace" (compare Hebrew shalom, Arabic salaam). Common as a Baptist and Methodist meetinghouse name, so much so that by mid-19c. it (along with Bethel and Ebenezer) had come to be used in Britain generically to mean "non-conformist chapel."
salep (n.) Look up salep at Dictionary.com
1736, "drug from starch or jelly made from dried tubers of orchid-like plants," from Turkish salep, from dialectal pronunciation of Arabic thaeleb, which usually is taken to be a shortening of khasyu 'th-thaeleb, literally "fox's testicles" (compare native English name dogstones).
salesman (n.) Look up salesman at Dictionary.com
1520s, from genitive of sale (compare craftsman, tradesman) + man (n.).
salesmanship (n.) Look up salesmanship at Dictionary.com
1853, from salesman + -ship.
The modern system of salesmanship has become so much like persecution reduced to a science, that it is quite a luxury to be allowed the use of your own discretion, without being dragooned, by a shopkeeper's deputy, into looking at what you do not care to see, or buying what you would not have. A man in his sane mind, with the usual organs of speech, has a right to be treated as if he knows what he wants, and is able to ask for it. ["The Literary World," Feb. 26, 1853]
salesperson (n.) Look up salesperson at Dictionary.com
1920, from genitive of sale + person.
saleswoman (n.) Look up saleswoman at Dictionary.com
1704, from genitive of sale + woman.
Salic (adj.) Look up Salic at Dictionary.com
"based on or contained in the law code of the Salian Franks," 1540s, from French Salique, from Medieval Latin Salicus, from the Salian Franks, a tribe that once lived near the Zuider Zee, the ancestors of the Merovingian kings, literally "those living near the river Sala" (modern Ijssel).

Salic Law, code of law of Germanic tribes, was invoked 1316 by Philip V of France to exclude a woman from succeeding to the throne of France (and later to combat the French claims of Edward III of England), but the precise meaning of the passage is unclear.
salience (n.) Look up salience at Dictionary.com
1836, "quality of leaping;" see salient (adj.) + -ence. Meaning "quality of standing out" is from 1849.
saliency (n.) Look up saliency at Dictionary.com
1660s, "leaping, jumping;" see salient (adj.) + -cy. From 1834 as "salience."
salient (adj.) Look up salient at Dictionary.com
1560s, "leaping," a heraldic term, from Latin salientem (nominative saliens), present participle of salire "to leap," from PIE root *sel- (4) "to jump" (cognates: Greek hallesthai "to leap," Middle Irish saltraim "I trample," and probably Sanskrit ucchalati "rises quickly").

It was used in Middle English as an adjective meaning "leaping, skipping." The meaning "pointing outward" (preserved in military usage) is from 1680s; that of "prominent, striking" first recorded 1840, from salient point (1670s), which refers to the heart of an embryo, which seems to leap, and translates Latin punctum saliens, going back to Aristotle's writings. Hence, the "starting point" of anything.
salient (n.) Look up salient at Dictionary.com
1828, from salient (adj.).
salination (n.) Look up salination at Dictionary.com
1705; see saline (adj.) -ation.
saline (adj.) Look up saline at Dictionary.com
"made of salt," c.1500, probably from a Latin word related to salinum "salt cellar" and salinae "salt pits," from sal (genitive salis) "salt" (see salt (n.)). Also in Middle English as a noun meaning "salt pit" (13c.). Saline solution attested from 1833.
salinity (n.) Look up salinity at Dictionary.com
1650s; see saline + -ity.
Salisbury steak (n.) Look up Salisbury steak at Dictionary.com
1897, from J.H. Salisbury (1823-1905), U.S. physician and food specialist, who promoted it. Incorrect use for "hamburger" traces to World War I and the deliberate attempt to purify American English of German loan words.
Salish (n.) Look up Salish at Dictionary.com
self-designation of the Native American people of Montana also known as Flathead, from a term containing -ish "people." The language group that includes their tongue has been called Salishan.
saliva (n.) Look up saliva at Dictionary.com
early 15c., from Middle French salive, from Latin saliva "spittle," of unknown origin (perhaps, as Tucker suggests, somehow derived from the base of sallow (adj.)).
salivary (adj.) Look up salivary at Dictionary.com
1709, from Latin salivarius, from saliva (see saliva).
salivate (v.) Look up salivate at Dictionary.com
1650s, "cause to produce saliva;" intransitive sense from 1680s, from Latin salivatus, past participle of salivare, from saliva (see saliva). Figurative use in reference to anticipation by 1965. Related: Salivated; salivating.
salivation (n.) Look up salivation at Dictionary.com
1590s, from French salivation or directly from Latin salivationem (nominative salivatio), noun of action from past participle stem of salivare (see salivate).
Salk Look up Salk at Dictionary.com
in reference to vaccine against poliomyelitis, 1954, from U.S. virologist Jonas Edward Salk (1914-1995), who developed it.
sallow (n.) Look up sallow at Dictionary.com
"shrubby willow plant," Old English sealh (Anglian salh), from Proto-Germanic *salhjon (cognates: Old Norse selja, Old High German salaha, and first element in German compound Salweide), from PIE *sal(i)k- "willow" (cognates: Latin salix "willow," Middle Irish sail, Welsh helygen, Breton halegen "willow"). French saule "willow" is from Frankish salha, from the Germanic root. Used in Palm Sunday processions and decorations in England before the importing of real palm leaves began.
sallow (adj.) Look up sallow at Dictionary.com
Old English salo "dusky, dark" (related to sol "dark, dirty"), from Proto-Germanic *salwa- (cognates: Middle Dutch salu "discolored, dirty," Old High German salo "dirty gray," Old Norse sölr "dirty yellow"), from PIE root *sal- "dirty, gray" (cognates: Old Church Slavonic slavojocije "grayish-blue color," Russian solovoj "cream-colored"). Related: Sallowness.
Sally Look up Sally at Dictionary.com
fem. proper name, alteration of Sarah (compare Hal from Harry, Moll from Mary, etc.). Sally Lunn cakes (1780) supposedly named for the woman in Bath who first made them and sold them in the streets. Sally Ann as a nickname for Salvation Army is recorded from 1927.
sally (n.) Look up sally at Dictionary.com
1540s, "a sudden rush, dash, or springing forth; specifically of troops from a besieged place, attacking the besiegers," from Middle French saillie "a rushing forth," noun use of fem. past participle of saillir "to leap," from Latin salire "to leap" (see salient (adj.)). Sally-port "gate or passage in a fortification to afford free egress to troops in making a sally" is from 1640s.
sally (v.) Look up sally at Dictionary.com
1540s, from sally (n.). Related: Sallied; sallying.
salmagundi (n.) Look up salmagundi at Dictionary.com
1670s, from French salmigondis (16c.), originally "seasoned salt meats" (compare French salmis "salted meats"), from Middle French salmigondin (16c.), of uncertain origin; Watkins derives it from Latin sal "salt" + condire "to season, flavor." Probably related to or influenced by Old French salemine "hodgepodge of meats or fish cooked in wine," which was borrowed in Middle English as salomene (early 14c.). Figurative sense of "mixture of various ingredients" is from 1761; it was the title of Washington Irving's satirical publication (1807-08). In dialect, salmon-gundy, solomon-gundy..
salmon (n.) Look up salmon at Dictionary.com
early 13c., from Anglo-French samoun, Old French salmun (Modern French saumon), from Latin salmonem (nominative salmo) "a salmon," probably originally "leaper," from salire "to leap" (see salient (adj.)), though some dismiss this as folk etymology. Another theory traces it to Celtic. Replaced Old English læx, from PIE *lax, the more usual word for the fish (see lox). In reference to a color, from 1786.
Salmonella (n.) Look up Salmonella at Dictionary.com
1913, the genus name, coined 1900 in Modern Latin by J. Lignières in reference to U.S. veterinary surgeon Daniel E. Salmon (1850-1914), who isolated a type of the bacteria in 1885.
Salome Look up Salome at Dictionary.com
fem. proper name, from Late Latin, from Greek Salome, related to Salomon (see Solomon).
salon (n.) Look up salon at Dictionary.com
1690s, "large room or apartment in a palace or great house," from French salon "reception room" (17c.), from Italian salone "large hall," from sala "hall," from a Germanic source (compare Old English sele, Old Norse salr "hall," Old High German sal "hall, house," German Saal), from Proto-Germanic *salaz, from PIE *sel- (1) "human settlement" (cognates: Old Church Slavonic selo "courtyard, village," obsolete Polish siolo, Russian selo "village," Lithuanian sala "village").

Sense of "reception room of a Parisian lady" is from 1810; meaning "gathering of fashionable people" first recorded 1888 (the woman who hosts one is a salonnière). Meaning "annual exhibition of contemporary paintings and sculpture in Paris" is from its originally being held in one of the salons of the Louvre. Meaning "establishment for hairdressing and beauty care" is from 1913.
saloon (n.) Look up saloon at Dictionary.com
1728, anglicized form of salon, and originally used interchangeable with it. Meaning "large hall in a public place for entertainment, etc." is from 1747; especially a passenger boat from 1817, also used of railway cars furnished like drawing rooms (1842). Sense of "public bar" developed by 1841, American English.
saloop (n.) Look up saloop at Dictionary.com
"sassafras tea, variously flavored," 1712, originally a variant of salep (q.v.).
Salopian (adj.) Look up Salopian at Dictionary.com
"pertaining to Shropshire;" see Shropshire.
salsa (n.) Look up salsa at Dictionary.com
kind of sauce, 1846; kind of dance music, 1975, from Spanish, literally "sauce," from Vulgar Latin *salsa "condiment" (see sauce (n.)). In American Spanish especially used of a kind of relish with chopped-up ingredients; the music so called from its blend of Latin jazz and rock styles.
salsify (n.) Look up salsify at Dictionary.com
biennial plant, 1710, from French salsifis, earlier sercifi, sassify (16c.), probably from Italian erba salsifica, from Old Italian salsifica, of uncertain origin, perhaps from Latin sal "salt" + fricare "to rub."
SALT (n.) Look up SALT at Dictionary.com
Cold War U.S.-U.S.S.R. nuclear weapons negotiations, 1968, acronym for Strategic Arms Limitation Talks (which would make SALT talks redundant, but the last element sometimes also is understood as treaty).
salt (n.) Look up salt at Dictionary.com
Old English sealt "salt" (n.; also as an adjective, "salty, briny"), from Proto-Germanic *saltom (cognates: Old Saxon, Old Norse, Old Frisian, Gothic salt, Dutch zout, German Salz), from PIE *sal- "salt" (cognates: Greek hals "salt, sea," Latin sal, Old Church Slavonic soli, Old Irish salann, Welsh halen "salt").

Modern chemistry sense is from 1790. Meaning "experienced sailor" is first attested 1840, in reference to the salinity of the sea. Salt was long regarded as having power to repel spiritual and magical evil. Many metaphoric uses reflect that this was once a rare and important resource, such as worth one's salt (1830), salt of the earth (Old English, after Matt. v:13). Belief that spilling salt brings bad luck is attested from 16c. To be above (or below) the salt (1590s) refers to customs of seating at a long table according to rank or honor, and placing a large salt-cellar in the middle of the dining table.

Salt-lick first recorded 1751; salt-marsh is Old English sealtne mersc; salt-shaker is from 1882. Salt-and-pepper "of dark and light color" first recorded 1915. To take something with a grain of salt is from 1640s, from Modern Latin cum grano salis.
salt (v.) Look up salt at Dictionary.com
Old English sealtan, from Proto-Germanic *salto- (see salt (n.)), and in part from the noun. Related: Salted; salting.
salt river (n.) Look up salt river at Dictionary.com
a tidal river, 1650s; as a proper name, used early 19c. with reference to backwoods inhabitants of the U.S., especially Kentucky. U.S. political slang phrase to row (someone) up Salt River "send (someone) to political defeat" probably owes its origin to this, as the first attested use (1828) is in a Kentucky context.
salt water (n.) Look up salt water at Dictionary.com
Old English sealtera watera. As an adjective from 1520s. Salt-water taffy attested by 1886; so called because it originally was sold at seashore resorts, especially Atlantic City, N.J. (see taffy).
salt-box (n.) Look up salt-box at Dictionary.com
also saltbox, "receptacle for keeping salt for domestic use," 1610s, from salt (n.) + box (n.). As a type of frame house, 1876, so called from resemblance of shape.
salt-cellar (n.) Look up salt-cellar at Dictionary.com
mid-15c., from salt (n.) + saler "salt-cellar" (14c.), from Old French salier "salt box" (Modern French salière), from Latin salarium, noun use of adjective meaning "pertaining to salt," from a diminutive of Latin sal "salt." As the connection between *saler and "salt" was lost, salt- was tacked on to the beginning; second element altered on model of cellar.
saltation (n.) Look up saltation at Dictionary.com
"a leap, a bound," 1620s, from Latin saltationem (nominative saltatio) "a dancing; dance," noun of action from past participle stem of saltare "to hop, dance," frequentative of salire "to leap" (see salient (adj.)).