showmanship (n.) Look up showmanship at Dictionary.com
1859, from showman "one who presents shows" + -ship.
showroom (n.) Look up showroom at Dictionary.com
"room for displaying furniture for sale," 1610s, from show (v.) + room (n.).
showy (adj.) Look up showy at Dictionary.com
1712, from show (n.) + -y (2). Related: Showiness; showiness. Originally in a positive sense.
shrank Look up shrank at Dictionary.com
past tense of shrink (v.).
shrapnel (n.) Look up shrapnel at Dictionary.com
1806, from Gen. Henry Shrapnel (1761-1842), who invented a type of exploding, fragmenting shell when he was a lieutenant in the Royal Artillery during the Peninsular War. The invention consisted of a hollow cannon ball, filled with shot, which burst in mid-air; his name for it was spherical case ammunition. Sense of "shell fragments" is first recorded 1940. The surname is attested from 13c., and is believed to be a metathesized form of Charbonnel, a diminutive form of Old French charbon "charcoal," in reference to complexion, hair color, or some other quality.
shred (v.) Look up shred at Dictionary.com
Old English screadian "to peel, prune, cut off," from Proto-Germanic *skrauth- (cognates: Middle Dutch scroden, Dutch schroeien, Old High German scrotan, German schroten "to shred"), from root of shred (n.). Meaning "cut or tear into shreds" is from 1610s. Related: Shredded; shredding.
shred (n.) Look up shred at Dictionary.com
Old English screade "piece cut off, cutting, scrap," from Proto-Germanic *skrauth- (cognates: Old Frisian skred "a cutting, clipping," Middle Dutch schroode "shred," Middle Low German schrot "piece cut off," Old High German scrot, "scrap, shred, a cutting, piece cut off," German Schrot ""log, block, small shot"," Old Norse skrydda "shriveled skin"), from PIE *skreu- "to cut; cutting tool," extension of root *(s)ker- (1) "to cut" (see shear (v.)).
shredded (adj.) Look up shredded at Dictionary.com
1570s, past participle adjective from shred (v.). Shredded wheat is recorded from 1885.
shredder (n.) Look up shredder at Dictionary.com
1570s, agent noun from shred (v.). In the paper disposal sense from 1950.
shrew (n.) Look up shrew at Dictionary.com
small insectivorous mammal, Old English screawa "shrew-mouse," unknown outside English, and "the absence of evidence for the word between the OE. period and the 16th c is remarkable" [OED]. Perhaps from Proto-Germanic *skraw-, from PIE *skreu- "to cut; cutting tool" (see shred (n.)), in reference to the shrew's pointed snout. Alternative Old English word for it was scirfemus, from sceorfan "to gnaw."

The meaning "peevish, malignant, clamorous, spiteful, vexatious, turbulent woman" [Johnson] is late 14c., from earlier sense of "spiteful person" (male or female), mid-13c., traditionally said to derive from some supposed malignant influence of the animal, which was once believed to have a venomous bite and was held in superstitious dread (compare beshrew). Paired with sheep from 1560s as the contrasting types of wives.
shrewd (adj.) Look up shrewd at Dictionary.com
c.1300, "wicked, evil," from shrewe "wicked man" (see shrew). Compare crabbed from crab (n.), dogged from dog (n.), wicked from witch (n.). The sense of "cunning" is first recorded 1510s. Related: Shrewdly; shrewdness. Strutt's "Sports and Pastimes of the People of England" (1801) has a shrewdness of apes for a company or group of them. Shrewdie "cunning person" is from 1916.
shrewish (adj.) Look up shrewish at Dictionary.com
late 14c., "wicked, malignant," from shrew + -ish. Of women, "malignant and scolding," from 1560s. Related: Shrewishly; shrewishness.
Shrewsbury Look up Shrewsbury at Dictionary.com
one of the most etymologically complex of English place names, it illustrates the changes wrought in Old English words by Anglo-French scribes who could not pronounce them. Recorded 1016 as Scrobbesbyrig, it originally may have meant "the fortified place in (a district called) The Scrub." The initial consonant cluster was impossible for the scribes, who simplified it to sr-, then added a vowel (sar-) to make it easier still.

The name was also changed by Anglo-French loss or metathesis of liquids in words containing -l-, -n-, or -r- (also evident in the derivatives of Old French Berengier "bear-spear" -- Old High German Beringar -- name of one of the paladins in the Charlemagne romances and a common given name in England 12c. and 13c., which has come down in surnames as Berringer, Bellanger, Benger, etc.). Thus Sarop- became Salop- and in the 12c. and 13c. the overwhelming spelling in government records was Salopesberie, which accounts for the abbreviation Salop for the modern county.

During all this, the Anglo-Saxon inhabitants (as opposed to the French scribes) still pronounced it properly, and regular sound evolutions probably produced a pronunciation something like Shrobesbury (which turns up on a 1327 patent roll). After a predictable -b- to -v- (a vowel in the Middle Ages) to -u- shift, the modern spelling begins to emerge 14c. and is fully established 15c.

Shrewsbury clock, for some reason, became proverbial for exactness, and thus, naturally, proverbial as indicating exaggeration of accuracy (1590s).
shriek (v.) Look up shriek at Dictionary.com
16c. variant of scrycke (c.1200), from Old Norse skrækja "to screech" (see screech), probably of imitative origin. Related: Shrieked; shrieking. The noun is attested from 1580s, from the verb.
shrift (n.) Look up shrift at Dictionary.com
Old English scrift "confession to priest, followed by penance and absolution," verbal noun from scrifan "to impose penance," from an early Germanic borrowing of Latin scribere "to write" (see script (n.)) that produced nouns for "penance, confession" in Old English and Scandinavian (such as Old Norse skrjpt "penance, confession"), but elsewhere in Germanic is used in senses "writing, scripture, alphabet letter;" see shrive. Short shrift originally was the brief time for a condemned criminal to confess before execution (1590s); figurative extension to "little or no consideration" is first attested 1814.
shrike (n.) Look up shrike at Dictionary.com
1540s, apparently from a survival of Old English scric "a shrike or thrush," literally "bird with a shrill call," probably echoic of its cry and related to shriek (compare Old Norse skrikja "shrieker, shrike," German schrik "moor hen," Swedish skrika "jay").
shrill (adj.) Look up shrill at Dictionary.com
late 14c., schrylle "high-pitched, piercing" (of the voice), probably related to Old English scralletan "to sound loudly" and of imitative origin (compare Low German schrell, German schrill "piercing, shrill"). Related: Shrillness; shrilly (adv.).
shrill (v.) Look up shrill at Dictionary.com
"to sound shrilly," c.1300, imitative (see shrill (adj.). Related: Shrilled; shrilling.
shrimp (n.) Look up shrimp at Dictionary.com
early 14c., "slender, edible marine crustacean," probably from Old Norse skreppa "thin person," from Proto-Germanic *skrimp- (see scrimp). Related to Old English scrimman "to shrink;" the connecting notion is probably "thinness" (compare Danish dialectal skrimpe "thin cattle"). The meaning "puny person" in English is attested from late 14c.; an especially puny one might be a shrimplet (1680s).
shrimp (v.) Look up shrimp at Dictionary.com
"fish for shrimp," 1801 (implied in shrimping ), from shrimp (n.). Related: Shrimper (1808).
shrine (n.) Look up shrine at Dictionary.com
Old English scrin "ark (of the covenant); chest, coffer; case for relics," from Latin scrinium "case or box for keeping papers," of unknown origin. From late 14c. as "a tomb of a saint" (usually elaborate and large). A widespread word, compare Dutch schrijn, German Schrein, French écrin, Russian skrynya, Lithuanian skrine.
Shriner (n.) Look up Shriner at Dictionary.com
1882, a member of the Order of Nobles of the Mystic Shrine (established 1872).
shrink (v.) Look up shrink at Dictionary.com
Old English scrincan "to draw in the limbs, contract, shrivel up; wither, pine away" (class III strong verb; past tense scranc, past participle scruncen), from Proto-Germanic *skrink- (cognates: Middle Dutch schrinken), probably from PIE root *(s)ker- (3) "to turn, bend" (see ring (n.1)).

Originally with causal shrench (compare drink/drench). Sense of "become reduced in size" recorded from late 13c. The meaning "draw back, recoil" (early 14c.) perhaps was suggested by the behavior of snails. Transitive sense, "cause to shrink" is from late 14c. Shrink-wrap is attested from 1961 (shrinking-wrap from 1959). Shrinking violet "shy person" attested from 1882.
shrink (n.) Look up shrink at Dictionary.com
"an act of shrinking," 1580s, from shrink (v.). Slang meaning "psychiatrist," (1966) is from head-shrinker.
shrinkage (n.) Look up shrinkage at Dictionary.com
1713, "act or fact of shrinking," from shrink (v.) + -age. Meaning "amount by which something has shrunk" is from 1862.
shrive (v.) Look up shrive at Dictionary.com
Old English scrifan "assign, prescribe, ordain, decree; impose penance, hear confession; have regard for, care for," apparently originally "to write" (strong, past tense scraf, past participle scrifen), from Proto-Germanic *skriban (cognates: Old Saxon scriban, Old Frisian skriva "write; impose penance;" Old Dutch scrivan, Dutch schrijven, German schreiben "to write, draw, paint;" Danish skrifte "confess"), an early borrowing from Latin scribere "to write" (see script (n.)), which in Old English and Scandinavian developed further to "confess, hear confession."
shrivel (v.) Look up shrivel at Dictionary.com
1560s (implied in shriveled), of unknown origin, not found in Middle English; perhaps from a Scandinavian source (compare Swedish skryvla "to wrinkle, to shrivel"), perhaps ultimately connected with shrimp (n.) and shrink (v.). Related: Shriveled; shriveling.
shriven Look up shriven at Dictionary.com
past participle of shrive (v.).
shriver (n.) Look up shriver at Dictionary.com
"confessor," mid-14c., agent noun from shrive (v.).
Shropshire Look up Shropshire at Dictionary.com
shortened form of the old spelling of Shrewsbury + shire.
shroud (n.) Look up shroud at Dictionary.com
Old English scrud "a garment, clothing, dress," from West Germanic *skruthan, from Proto-Germanic *skrud- "cut" (cognates: Old Norse skruð "shrouds of a ship, tackle, gear; furniture of a church," Danish, Swedish skrud "dress, attire"), from PIE *skreu- "to cut" (see shred (n.)).

Specific meaning "winding-sheet, cloth or sheet for burial," to which the word now is restricted, first attested 1560s. Sense of "strong rope supporting the mast of a ship" (mid-15c.) is from the notion of "clothing" a spar or mast; one without rigging was said to be naked.
shroud (v.) Look up shroud at Dictionary.com
c.1300, "to clothe, to cover, protect," from Old English scrydan, scridan "to clothe, dress;" see shroud (n.). Meaning "to hide from view, conceal" (transitive) is attested from early 15c. Related: Shrouded; shrouding.
shrove (n.) Look up shrove at Dictionary.com
"shrift, shriving," 1570s, shortened from Shrovetide (early 15c.), from schrof-, related to schrifen (see shrive). Shrove Tuesday (c.1500) is from practice of celebration and merrymaking before going to confession at the beginning of Lent.
shrub (n.) Look up shrub at Dictionary.com
Old English scrybb "brushwood, shrubbery," a rare and late word (but preserved also, perhaps, in Shrewsbury), possibly from a Scandinavian source (compare dialectal Danish skrub "brushwood," Norwegian skrubba "dwarf tree"). Presumably related to North Frisian skrobb "broom plant, brushwood;" West Flemish schrobbe "climbing wild pea," with a base notion of "rough plant," from PIE *(s)kerb-, extended form of root *(s)ker- (1) "to cut" (see shear (v.)).
shrubbery (n.) Look up shrubbery at Dictionary.com
1748, "place where shrubs are planted," from shrub + -ery. As "shrubs collectively," from 1777.
shrug (n.) Look up shrug at Dictionary.com
a shoulder motion meant to express indifference, want of an answer, etc., 1590s, from shrug (v.).
shrug (v.) Look up shrug at Dictionary.com
c.1400, schurgyng, of uncertain origin. Perhaps connected to Danish skrugge "to stoop, crouch." Related: Shrugged; shrugging. To shrug (something) off "dismiss" is recorded from 1909.
shrunken (adj.) Look up shrunken at Dictionary.com
Old English gescruncan, past participle adjective from shrink (v.).
shtetl (n.) Look up shtetl at Dictionary.com
Jewish small town or village in Eastern Europe, 1949, from Yiddish, literally "little town," from diminutive of German Stadt "city, town," from Old High German stat "place," from PIE root *sta- "to stand" (see stet).
shtick (n.) Look up shtick at Dictionary.com
also schtick, 1959, from Yiddish shtik "an act, gimmick," literally "a piece, slice," from Middle High German stücke "piece, play," from Old High German stucki (see stock (n.1)).
shtoom (adj.) Look up shtoom at Dictionary.com
"speechless, silent," from Yiddish, from German stumm "silent, mute" (see stammer (v.)).
shtup (v.) Look up shtup at Dictionary.com
"annoy," 1952; "have sexual intercourse with," 1967; from Yiddish, literally "push, shove," related to dialectal German stupfen "to nudge, jog."
shuck (v.) Look up shuck at Dictionary.com
"to remove the shucks from," 1819, from or related to shuck (n.). Related: Shucked; shucking.

Many extended senses are from the notion of "stripping" an ear of corn, or from the capers associated with husking frolics; such as "to strip (off) one's clothes" (1848) and "to deceive, swindle, cheat, fool" (1959); phrase shucking and jiving "fooling, deceiving" is suggested from 1966, in U.S. black English, but compare shuck (v.) a slang term among "cool musicians" for "to improvise chords, especially to a piece of music one does not know" (1957), and shuck (n.) "a theft or fraud," in use by 1950s among U.S. blacks.
[B]lack senses probably fr[om] the fact that black slaves sang and shouted gleefully during corn-shucking season, and this behavior, along with lying and teasing, became a part of the protective and evasive behavior normally adopted towards white people in "traditional" race relations; the sense of "swindle" is perhaps related to the mid-1800s term to be shucked out, "be defeated, be denied victory," which suggests that the notion of stripping someone as an ear of corn is stripped may be basic in the semantics. ["Dictionary of American Slang"]
shuck (n.) Look up shuck at Dictionary.com
"husk, pod, shell," 1670s, of unknown origin. Compare shuck (v.). Later used in reference to the shells of oysters and clams (1872). Figurative as a type of something worthless from 1836.
shucks (interj.) Look up shucks at Dictionary.com
expression of indifference, 1847, from shuck (n.) in the secondary sense "something valueless" (i.e. not worth shucks, attested in a separate source from 1847).
shudder (v.) Look up shudder at Dictionary.com
early 14c., possibly from Middle Dutch schuderen "to shudder," or Middle Low German schoderen, both frequentative forms from Proto-Germanic *skuth- "to shake." Related: Shuddered; shuddering.
shudder (n.) Look up shudder at Dictionary.com
c.1600, from shudder (v.).
shuffle (v.) Look up shuffle at Dictionary.com
1530s, put together hastily," probably from Middle English shovelen "to move with dragging feet," itself probably a frequentative form of shoven (see shove (v.)). Or perhaps from Low German schuffeln "to walk clumsily, deal dishonestly."

Of playing cards, first recorded 1560s. Meaning "walk slowly without lifting the feet" is from 1570s. Meaning "push along gradually" is from 1560s. Meaning "move from one place to another" is from 1690s. Meaning "do a shuffle dance" is from 1818. Related: Shuffled; shuffling. Shuffle off "get rid of, dispose of" is from Shakespeare (1601).
shuffle (n.) Look up shuffle at Dictionary.com
1620s, "an evasion, trick;" 1640s, "a wavering or undecided course of behavior meant to deceive;" from shuffle (v.). Meaning "a slow, heavy, irregular manner of moving" is from 1847; that of "a dance in which the feet are shuffled" is from 1640s. Meaning "a change in the order of playing-cards" is from 1650s. Phrase lost in the shuffle is from 1930.
shuffleboard (n.) Look up shuffleboard at Dictionary.com
1530s, shovillaborde "shovel board," an unexplained alteration of shove-board (1520s), from shove (v.) + board (n.1). Originally a tabletop game (c.1600), the large-scale version (1877) was invented for play on ocean liners.