mobile (adj.) Look up mobile at Dictionary.com
late 15c., from Middle French mobile (14c.), from Latin mobilis "movable, easy to move; loose, not firm," figuratively, "pliable, flexible, susceptible, nimble, quick; changeable, inconstant, fickle," contraction of *movibilis, from movere "to move" (see move (v.)). Sociology sense from 1927. Mobile home first recorded 1940.
Mobile Look up Mobile at Dictionary.com
city in Alabama, U.S., attested c.1540 in Spanish as Mauvila, referring to an Indian group and perhaps from Choctaw (Muskogean) moeli "to paddle." Related: Mobilian.
mobile (n.) Look up mobile at Dictionary.com
early 15c. in astronomy, "outer sphere of the universe," from mobile (adj.); the artistic sense is first recorded 1949 as a shortening of mobile sculpture (1936). Now-obsolete sense of "the common people, the rabble" (1670s) led to mob (n.).