confection (n.) Look up confection at
mid-14c., confescioun, from Old French confeccion (12c., Modern French confection) "drawing up (of a treaty, etc.); article, product," in pharmacology, "mixture, compound," from Late Latin confectionem (nominative confectio) "a confection," in classical Latin, "a making, preparing," noun of action from confect-, past participle stem of conficere "to prepare," from com- "with" (see com-) + facere "to make, do" (see factitious). Originally "the making by means of ingredients," sense of "candy or light pastry" predominated from 16c.