forge (n.) Look up forge at Dictionary.com
late 14c., "a smithy," from Old French forge (12c.) "forge, smithy," earlier faverge, from Latin fabrica "workshop," from faber (genitive fabri) "workman in hard materials, smith" (see fabric). As the heating apparatus itself, from late 15c.
forge (v.2) Look up forge at Dictionary.com
1610s, "make way, move ahead," of unknown origin, perhaps an alteration of force (v.), but perhaps rather from forge (n.), via notion of steady hammering at something. Originally nautical, in reference to vessels.
forge (v.1) Look up forge at Dictionary.com
c.1300, "to make, shape, create," from Old French forgier, from Latin fabricari "to frame, construct, build," from fabrica "workshop" (see forge (n.)). Meaning "to counterfeit" is early 14c. Related: Forged; forging.