lodge (n.) Look up lodge at Dictionary.com
mid-13c. in surnames and place names; late 13c. as "small building or hut," from Old French loge "arbor, covered walk; hut, cabin, grandstand at a tournament," from Frankish *laubja "shelter" (cognate with Old High German louba "porch, gallery," German Laube "bower, arbor"), from Proto-Germanic *laubja- "shelter," likely originally "shelter of foliage," or "roof made from bark," from root of leaf (n.).

"Hunter's cabin" sense is first recorded late 14c. Sense of "local branch of a society" is first recorded 1680s, from mid-14c. logge "workshop of masons." Also used of certain American Indian buildings, hence lodge-pole (1805). Feste of Logges (c.1400) was a Middle English rendition of the Old Testament Jewish Feast of Tabernacles.
lodge (v.) Look up lodge at Dictionary.com
c.1200, loggen, "to encamp, set up camp;" c. 1300 "to put in a certain place," from Old French logier "lodge; find lodging for" (Modern French loger), from loge (see lodge (n.)). From late 14c. as "to dwell, live; to have temporary accomodations; to provide (someone) with sleeping quarters; to get lodgings." Sense of "to get a thing in the intended place, to make something stick" is from 1610s. Related: Lodged; lodging.