report (n.)
late 14c., "an account brought by one person to another, rumor," from Old French report "pronouncement, judgment" (Modern French rapport), from reporter "to tell, relate" (see report (v.)).

Meaning "resounding noise, sound of an explosion" is from 1580s. Meaning "formal statement of results of an investigation" first attested 1660s; sense of "teacher's official statement of a pupil's work and behavior" is from 1873 (report card in the school sense first attested 1919).
report (v.)
late 14c., "to make known, tell, relate," from Old French reporter "to tell, relate; bring back, carry away, hand over," from Latin reportare "carry back, bear back, bring back," figuratively "report," in Medieval Latin "write (an account) for information or record," from re- "back" (see re-) + portare "to carry" (see port (n.1)). Early 15c. as "to submit" (to an authority, etc.). Meaning "to name someone as having offended somehow" is from 1885. Related: Reported; reporting.