rupture (n.) Look up rupture at
late 14c., originally medical, from Latin ruptura "the breaking (of an arm or leg), fracture," from past participle stem of rumpere "to break," from PIE *reup- "to snatch" (see rip (v.)). Specifically as "abdominal hernia" from early 15c.
rupture (v.) Look up rupture at
1739, from rupture (n.). Related: Ruptured; rupturing. Ruptured duck (1945) was U.S. GI's dismissive term (based on its design) for the discharge button they were awarded.